: 33x10.50R15 how much lift


wvuviv30
03-30-2005, 04:46 PM
I am the owner of a New Tacoma.. well its a 98 that just was just broken in.

Well the tires aren't the greatest.
I have a set of 33x10.5R15 BFG on a set of 15x7" ~4" backspacing 90-95 Alloys (split 4 spoke).

How much lift do I need to run these?

I do have manual locking front hubs.

I looked at the guides but they list 33x12.50s.

TacomaNova
03-30-2005, 04:54 PM
Chris has about 3 inches or maybe a little less and he is running 33x10.50s, im sure he will chime in.. i think he has SAWs and new leaf pack in the rear

duaggie
03-30-2005, 05:02 PM
I am running those tires on a 99 tacoma. I have a 3" Corn Fed spacer lift in the front with an add-a-leaf in the back. The tires do rub some a full compression on the front. They also get very very close to the rear most side of the back fender when the bed is under a full load (1/16" close). I am going to add a 1 inch body lift to fix that. Other than they they look and perform good.

The spacer lift is inexpensive, but will make you truck ride very rough. There are many options and lots of great information on this website. You may want to run a search on lifts to learn the pros and cons of other lifts.

So I guess your answer is 3 to 4 inches, but it depends. I have read that you will have problems if you decide to go with coilovers b/c you get too much compression with them, but I don't know this as I have never tried.

Good luck.

Brad

Gvus
03-30-2005, 05:23 PM
I'm running the same tire with 3" rough country spacer up front and rough country 2 1/2" shackle with a skyjacker 2" AAL. Doesnt rub unless your at a full lock turn.

99TanTaco
03-30-2005, 06:44 PM
I have about 2-1/2" of lift with Wheeler's type A wheels which I think are 4-1/2" BS and the only rub I have is in the rear on the lower forward most inner fender bolts

TacoCrazy
03-31-2005, 06:09 AM
I am the owner of a New Tacoma.. well its a 98 that just was just broken in.

Well the tires aren't the greatest.
I have a set of 33x10.5R15 BFG on a set of 15x7" ~4" backspacing 90-95 Alloys (split 4 spoke).

How much lift do I need to run these?

I do have manual locking front hubs.

I looked at the guides but they list 33x12.50s.
If you'll look at my pics you can see 33x10.50 M/T's on about 3" or less...

wvuviv30
03-31-2005, 10:01 AM
I forgot to mention, but a couple of you did it...

What parts did you use? And how well do you like your lift?

duby08
03-31-2005, 10:26 AM
I forgot to mention, but a couple of you did it...

What parts did you use? And how well do you like your lift?

I ran on cornfed and 3" aal's for awhile and rubbed at full turn/with suspension compression and I just barely rubbed in the rear at full flex. I'm now running Donahoes up front and All Pro springs with 1.5" shackles in the rear and I have yet to run at any point. I did do the pinchweld mod and a little plastic trimming when I first put the cornfed on.

JESSE_at_TLT
03-31-2005, 05:21 PM
You can run 33x10.5" tires on those wheels with ZERO lift. We've done it on several Toyota/Tacoma pickups. If you lift your truck __" to clear __" tires, they will still rub on compression travel. Does that make sense?

The tires that fit your truck should clear everything on FULL compression, and 33x10.5" tires can/do. I've posted several times, suggesting how a person can cycle the suspension to check for clearance and trim plastic, hammer firewall seams, etc.

hytenor
04-01-2005, 12:06 PM
You can run 33x10.5" tires on those wheels with ZERO lift. We've done it on several Toyota/Tacoma pickups. If you lift your truck __" to clear __" tires, they will still rub on compression travel. Does that make sense?

The tires that fit your truck should clear everything on FULL compression, and 33x10.5" tires can/do. I've posted several times, suggesting how a person can cycle the suspension to check for clearance and trim plastic, hammer firewall seams, etc.

do you have a writeup on that? I didn't notice on on your site.

I did notice the new Atlas Tcase for the Taco, however....nice :D price?

I wonder about that in place of a crawler...hmmm

MidwestTaco95
04-01-2005, 03:00 PM
GO WITH DONAHOES!!! i have them and im clearing 33x12.5's

StemsCornfedTaco
04-03-2005, 04:50 PM
I'd go 3" atleast to clear for 33's, I have 4.5" of lift and i clear 33's no prob.

gary briggs
04-03-2005, 07:32 PM
im running 33x12.50r15 on pro comp #87 black steelies, i have sightly over 3" in the front and 2 in the back via an aal, i would say it has a minor rub at most with the sus. compressed at a full turn, it rides like shit and i hate it, way to stiff and unforgiving, spacers r cheap and if u just drive on the street they would be fine. im shit cannin the spacers and aal and buying a fabtec lift with a whole new leaf pack in the back. my opinion, dont waste yer time on spacers.

hytenor
04-03-2005, 07:37 PM
im running 33x12.50r15 on pro comp #87 black steelies, i have sightly over 3" in the front and 2 in the back via an aal, i would say it has a minor rub at most with the sus. compressed at a full turn, it rides like shit and i hate it, way to stiff and unforgiving, spacers r cheap and if u just drive on the street they would be fine. im shit cannin the spacers and aal and buying a fabtec lift with a whole new leaf pack in the back. my opinion, dont waste yer time on spacers.

with only 3" you'll rub with 33x12.50s quite a bit when you get into some really twisty stuff like the cracks at Hollister hills...both front and rear. ;)

as long as the tires don't wipe out the fenders a little rubbin' is no big deal.

JESSE_at_TLT
04-04-2005, 11:56 AM
Chris-

I'm sorry, we haven't written any articles specifically about fitting 33" tires without any lift, but I ran them on my little red Tacoma and the Donahoe Tacoma for a while. The red truck rode at stock height and the Donahoe truck was obviously lifted, but they both need the exact same tire clearance. It doesn't matter how much you lift a truck or what the ride height is. Full compression is where tire clearance matters.

The best way to do this is put the vehicle on jack-stands, remove the coil-overs, reinstall the wheel/tire and then cycle the suspension towards full compression. You will notice rubbing on some of the plastic panels and the pinch-weld on the firewall, etc., but after a little bit of careful trimming and hammering the tires will clear at full compression and lock-to-lock steering without any noticable interference.

The same process/advise applies to any vehicle/tire size/suspension type. For the rear suspension, you only have to remove your leaf-springs, disassemble the pack and then reinstall the main leaf spring (maybe the second spring too, depending on the truck and the leaf-pack) on the truck. Then you can cycle the suspension with a floor-jack to determine the PERFECT shock placement or check for body clearance, etc. It's time-consuming, but it's better than a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey approach to shck placement, tire/fender clearance, etc.

Hope that helps. If this is a topic that enough people are interested in, maybe we can try to write-up something Tacoma-specific. We are going to publish an article that covers the major points of this type of work (applied to out Donahoe Tacoma-length leafspring-equipped 1st gen. 4Runner) with Off Road magazine sometime in the next few months.

Bnorm
04-04-2005, 03:04 PM
I am the owner of a New Tacoma.. well its a 98 that just was just broken in.

Well the tires aren't the greatest.
I have a set of 33x10.5R15 BFG on a set of 15x7" ~4" backspacing 90-95 Alloys (split 4 spoke).

How much lift do I need to run these?

I do have manual locking front hubs.

I looked at the guides but they list 33x12.50s.
Check out this site for info on a nice front setup.
http://fastq.com/~sschaefer/recommend.html
I'm going this route soon. (The tundra coils) The front suspension is nearly identical between the 4runner and Taco. (Only the sway bar differs).

hytenor
04-04-2005, 07:50 PM
Chris-

I'm sorry, we haven't written any articles specifically about fitting 33" tires without any lift, but I ran them on my little red Tacoma and the Donahoe Tacoma for a while. The red truck rode at stock height and the Donahoe truck was obviously lifted, but they both need the exact same tire clearance. It doesn't matter how much you lift a truck or what the ride height is. Full compression is where tire clearance matters.

The best way to do this is put the vehicle on jack-stands, remove the coil-overs, reinstall the wheel/tire and then cycle the suspension towards full compression. You will notice rubbing on some of the plastic panels and the pinch-weld on the firewall, etc., but after a little bit of careful trimming and hammering the tires will clear at full compression and lock-to-lock steering without any noticable interference.

The same process/advise applies to any vehicle/tire size/suspension type. For the rear suspension, you only have to remove your leaf-springs, disassemble the pack and then reinstall the main leaf spring (maybe the second spring too, depending on the truck and the leaf-pack) on the truck. Then you can cycle the suspension with a floor-jack to determine the PERFECT shock placement or check for body clearance, etc. It's time-consuming, but it's better than a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey approach to shck placement, tire/fender clearance, etc.

Hope that helps. If this is a topic that enough people are interested in, maybe we can try to write-up something Tacoma-specific. We are going to publish an article that covers the major points of this type of work (applied to out Donahoe Tacoma-length leafspring-equipped 1st gen. 4Runner) with Off Road magazine sometime in the next few months.

cool, thanks. I have to pull my SAWs to tear them down and anti-sease the threads so that will be a good time to do it.

Before AZ rocks I had cut some of the plastic and pounded the lower portion of the pinchweld and then tried to lower the coilovers. (the right side worked but I broke the wrench trying to do the dr. side) The tires grabbed the plastic where I had cut it and folded it up making quite a racket during most any articulation...oops. I just need to cut more but I didn't want to take all of the plastic off and leave the fender open to mud, etc collecting into the door, etc. What is the best way to do this but maintain the protection that the OE plastic offers?

JESSE_at_TLT
04-04-2005, 08:17 PM
Ditch the plastic and use Silicone along the pinch-weld where you fold it over. We bought a few sheets of ABS plastic and cut them up to make a pair of custom inner fenders when we installed fiberglass front fenders on our LT Tacoma. We had to remove those recently though, when we cut out the firewall and trim the fenders to clear 35's. We ran it like that on our last trip down to Baja for the San Felipe 250, then over to the Pacific coast (through a LOT of mud and gunk). After a pressure-wash, we got everything out of the doorjam and seals, etc. If you're only trying to fit 33x10.5's, I'm sure you can easily replace whatever you need to remove.

hytenor
04-04-2005, 08:22 PM
Ditch the plastic and use Silicone along the pinch-weld where you fold it over. We bought a few sheets of ABS plastic and cut them up to make a pair of custom inner fenders when we installed fiberglass front fenders on our LT Tacoma. We had to remove those recently though, when we cut out the firewall and trim the fenders to clear 35's. We ran it like that on our last trip down to Baja for the San Felipe 250, then over to the Pacific coast (through a LOT of mud and gunk). After a pressure-wash, we got everything out of the doorjam and seals, etc. If you're only trying to fit 33x10.5's, I'm sure you can easily replace whatever you need to remove.
cool, thanks

I bought a can of that spray-on liner stuff so I'll just make up some plastic to fill the hole, silicone it in and spray the whole thing...should work.

AK98Taco
04-19-2005, 07:15 PM
im running 33x12.50r15 on pro comp #87 black steelies, i have sightly over 3" in the front and 2 in the back via an aal, i would say it has a minor rub at most with the sus. compressed at a full turn, it rides like shit and i hate it, way to stiff and unforgiving, spacers r cheap and if u just drive on the street they would be fine. im shit cannin the spacers and aal and buying a fabtec lift with a whole new leaf pack in the back. my opinion, dont waste yer time on spacers.

Wow, that's a mouthful.

I'm running a 3" Cornfed kit (spacers up front, AAL in back), with 33x12.50s and 15x10s. The rubbing on the rear bedsides is quite bad during articulation, but the rear isn't too bad most of the time.

The ride isn't bad at all, but I'm used to driving a heavy duty Chevy IFS truck and big solid axle trucks. Maybe it's your new truck and new springs that need to break in, but I don't see how the ride is "shit."

I wheel my truck hard, and have no regrets about the lift. I got it because of some tires I bought a while ago, but it serves me fine.

expeditionswest
04-19-2005, 08:23 PM
No lift is required to fit a 33x10.5 as mentioned above.

Here is a picture of my truck with a 33.3x10.5 (255/85 R16) with no lift (lots of trimming and centering of the rear axle thought)

http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/tacoma/255-85/25585R16BFGMTKMs/images/stock_height.jpg

I currently run 1.5" of lift with my Donahoe coil-overs and 2" in the rear with custom Deavers (10 leaf). I did not lower the bump stops or add a body lift, and the swaybar has been removed. I have full travel in the front and rear, though I do rub slightly in the rear at full compression, and on the frame in the front at full lock.

I wrote a technical document on fitting of these tires, which would also apply to the 33x10.5 R15. This should help... :)

You can read the document here: (http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/tacoma/bfg_mt_km.html)

wvuviv30
04-19-2005, 08:46 PM
http://image48.webshots.com/48/9/38/85/326693885KpOBfB_ph.jpg

33x10.50 fit on stock height, with the help of trimming... once I get home I am going to pound the pinch weld flat... and install some OME 881s.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/309906412/326693885KpOBfB#

deermeat
04-19-2005, 09:42 PM
im running 35x16 boogers on a 3 inch body it only hits when im offroad but i have a steel front bumper

hytenor
04-19-2005, 09:49 PM
im running 35x16 boogers on a 3 inch body it only hits when im offroad but i have a steel front bumper

O boy, another "I run 35s with only 3" of lift" line. right.

ianshoots
04-19-2005, 10:50 PM
I wrote a technical document on fitting of these tires, which would also apply to the 33x10.5 R15. This should help... :)

You can read the document here: (http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/tacoma/bfg_mt_km.html)
I read the document, I wonder if you can elaborate on centering the (rear) axle? Are there any writeups I should know about tht deal with this? Is axle centering done pretty much by eyeball?

Thanks,
Ian

expeditionswest
04-19-2005, 11:11 PM
I read the document, I wonder if you can elaborate on centering the (rear) axle? Are there any writeups I should know about tht deal with this?

The rear axle is centered in the wheelwell (moving the rear wheel and tire closer to the front of the truck) in two manners.

1. Drilling the center pin holes on the spring pack .5" closer to the front eye than stock. This image does a decent job of showing that. The spring eyes are even on the right of the image, yet the center pin of the Deaver pack is right of the stock pack pin by about .5".

http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/tacoma/suspension/DeaverSprings/images/DSC02138.jpg

2. Moving the center pin hole on the axle spring plate closer to the rear of the truck (which, when the spring center pin is positioned in that hole would move the axle forward), this can also be accomplished with a short (.5-1") lift block that has a centered axle plate pin, but rearward located spring pin hole (they are staggered by .5").

The reason why this is necessary is that the stock springs position the axle slightly rearward of center in the wheelwell. So when a large tire it fitted, upon full compression the tire will make contact first at the rear of the wheelwell. Now, my tires still make contact, but in the front and back of the flare evenly (though the rubbing is light).

Hope that helps :saw:

ianshoots
04-19-2005, 11:17 PM
Thanks scott, good stuff. I guess the re-drilling of my leaf pack would be the logical option for me, as I have just installed new springs and shackles, both of which give adequate lift (so I don't really want to add a block).

Again, thanks for the info,
Ian

NorcalPR
04-19-2005, 11:27 PM
Looks like I'll be doin that when I do the AAL. Thanks!

deermeat
04-20-2005, 04:09 PM
O boy, another "I run 35s with only 3" of lift" line. right.
this isnt deermeat, its a friend, i dont know about you but id rather not flip my rig, i mean you may be a rich daddies boy, but im not, i run 35x16x15 boggers on my 87 with 3 inches, dont belive me? lift isnt everything, but then again i guess your the uneducated kid that thinks more lift will get you anywhere.

AK98Taco
04-20-2005, 04:16 PM
Moving the axle center forward on the leaf spring will also reduce axlewrap somewhat.

AK98Taco
04-20-2005, 04:20 PM
this isnt deermeat, its a friend, i dont know about you but id rather not flip my rig, i mean you may be a rich daddies boy, but im not, i run 35x16x15 boggers on my 87 with 3 inches, dont belive me? lift isnt everything, but then again i guess your the uneducated kid that thinks more lift will get you anywhere.

Good, God.

One piece of information: the question was asked about Tacomas, not '87 pickups, hence your comment is not completely useful to the person who posed the question.

hytenor
04-21-2005, 10:07 AM
this isnt deermeat, its a friend, i dont know about you but id rather not flip my rig, i mean you may be a rich daddies boy, but im not, i run 35x16x15 boggers on my 87 with 3 inches, dont belive me? lift isnt everything, but then again i guess your the uneducated kid that thinks more lift will get you anywhere.

whatever. and I probably graduated from hs long before you were born.

with enough sawzall and hammer work you can make most any size tire fit. but there's no way you can get 35s on a Tacoma (since this forum is predominately for that particular truck) with only 3" of lift without major trimming and pounding or aftermarket fenders. Heck, a lot of guys rub like crazy with 33s and 6".

JESSE_at_TLT
04-21-2005, 11:40 AM
Chris-
Deermeet said "it only hits when im offroad". I don't know about you, but that's when I'm most concerned about tire clearance. The bottom line is that if you haven't cut your firewall, you shouldn't be running 35's with any amount of lift using stock suspension attachment points, because it's going to RUB like crazy on compression travel. If you manage to avoid that, it only means that your suspension isn't working.

If anyone is interested, we're just finishing-up a really detailed article about how we clearanced our firewall and inner fenders to clear 35's on full compression (that means NO lift) that will publish on Off-Road.Com (http://www.off-road.com/toyota/projects/tacoma/ultimate_axle_pt3/index.html) next month. We're running a Total Chaos long-travel kit on our Tacoma, but most of the tech (expect for the templates) applies to stock-width trucks too.

We're also working on a similar article about cycling the rear suspension on our '89 4Runner to determine shock placement and body clearance that will be published with Off-Road Magazine. Sean posted some pictures of that project in this thread (http://www.tacomaterritory.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6189).

expeditionswest-
That's a really well-written article. Cool website too.

I think the image and advise given about redrilling the spring-pack to center your tires in the rear wheel-well might be a little misleading/incomplete though, judging by other people's replies.

We've had one Tacoma that rubbed the rear tires on the front of the wheel-wells on compression and another similar Tacoma that rubbed on the rear of the wheel-wells on compression. Go figure. You really have to check each vehicle and make adjustments accordingly.

How you compress the suspension will also have something to do with where the wheel is located within the wheel-well on compression. Vertical compression travel should be measured by diassembling the spring-pack and cycling the suspension with only the main (and maybe the second) leaf. That will tell you where the tires would be on full compression when both sides were compressed equally (if you were to jump the truck, etc.). Clearance on articulated compression travel is probably what most of you are more interested though, and it's different than vertical suspension travel because of the slight amount of rear-steer (as one of your rear wheels compresses into the wheel-well, the other rear wheel that is falling away away from the truck on extension travel also moves forward because of the arc of the leaf-springs). So measuring tire clearance with a ramp or forklift will give you slightly different results. Ideally, you would clearance for both types of suspension travel. Realistically, it'll problably be ok either way you measure it as long as you're not working with really tight clearances.

And I think expeditionswest was suggesting that custom leaf-spring packs can be ORDERED with the centering-pin relocated, not that anyone should actually redrill their leaf-springs. The best way to relocate your axle in relation to the leaf-spring centering-pin is to redrill the spring pads on your axle housing. If you move the hole forward/backwards by less than the diameter of the hole, you'll end-up with an oval hole in the spring-pad. I'd suggest filling that hole first (welding) and then redrilling a new hole.

hytenor
04-21-2005, 12:04 PM
you guys have all the cool stuff, I'm jealous!

what did you wind up doing with your Tundra front axle problems at Takeover?

ianshoots
04-21-2005, 02:52 PM
And I think expeditionswest was suggesting that custom leaf-spring packs can be ORDERED with the centering-pin relocated, not that anyone should actually redrill their leaf-springs. The best way to relocate your axle in relation to the leaf-spring centering-pin is to redrill the spring pads on your axle housing. If you move the hole forward/backwards by less than the diameter of the hole, you'll end-up with an oval hole in the spring-pad. I'd suggest filling that hole first (welding) and then redrilling a new hole.

That makes sense. Drilling a new hole in the entire springpack seems(ed?) like it would be A)Hard to do without a serious drill press and B)Far beyond the sort of work I'd try myself (at this point).

All good info that I will mostly just store away and not apply for a looong time.

Thanks guys.

JESSE_at_TLT
04-22-2005, 11:58 AM
Chris-
We took out the front diff! No, we haven't fixed that problem, but I haven't forgotten about it either. We're building that new rear axle (http://www.off-road.com/toyota/projects/tacoma/ultimate_axle_pt3/index.html), installing a 5:1 Altas transfer-case right now and doing a lot of fabrication work on the bedcage, completing the rollcage and building new shock mounts so we can do more suspension-tuning/testing. We're also getting ready to start Sean's 4Runner coil-over/straight-axle conversion. I've got to make some time to work on developing custom CV's. Sorry for the highjack.

hytenor
04-22-2005, 02:21 PM
Chris-
We took out the front diff! No, we haven't fixed that problem, but I haven't forgotten about it either. We're building that new rear axle (http://www.off-road.com/toyota/projects/tacoma/ultimate_axle_pt3/index.html), installing a 5:1 Altas transfer-case right now and doing a lot of fabrication work on the bedcage, completing the rollcage and building new shock mounts so we can do more suspension-tuning/testing. We're also getting ready to start Sean's 4Runner coil-over/straight-axle conversion. I've got to make some time to work on developing custom CV's. Sorry for the highjack.

Ah, so you're just a prerunner now :p you should try and get the '05 8" front diff in there. How about some telescoping front axles? Downey has some for the earlier IFS but not for Tacos...and you can only use 4-lo :(

JESSE_at_TLT
04-22-2005, 02:28 PM
We're working on it Chris. I'm not putting a 5:1 transfer-case in there just to keep it 2WD.

hytenor
04-22-2005, 02:56 PM
We're working on it Chris. I'm not putting a 5:1 transfer-case in there just to keep it 2WD.

what did the Atlas wind up costing you?

expeditionswest
04-26-2005, 10:42 AM
Jesse,

Thanks for responding to the questions and clarifying the axle centering concept (much better than I did). I was in Baja on a little adventure...

I really enjoyed checking out your LONG travel 4wd Tacoma. That truck must be a blast :)

hytenor
04-26-2005, 11:23 AM
Jesse,

Thanks for responding to the questions and clarifying the axle centering concept (much better than I did). I was in Baja on a little adventure...

I really enjoyed checking out your LONG travel 4wd Tacoma. That truck must be a blast :)

you should see him wheel that thing, LOL. Even in 2wd he went everywhere the 4x4s went during Takeover with no problems...simply amazing what the additional articulation of his suspension can do to maintain traction.

MickTaco
05-09-2005, 05:32 PM
Scott,
I was checking out your write up on your rear suspension, I have a few questions on your installation.
Moving the axle forward .5" like you did, do you have to do any type of modifications to the drive shaft since your axle is now .5" closer? Also did take off one spring, put on the new deaver 10 leaf, ratchet the axle forward on that side, then do the same on the opposite side? Or did you take off both springs put on the new ones and then move the axle forward and then install the center bolts?

Thanks,
-Mick

Packoo
05-09-2005, 05:56 PM
Chris-

I'm sorry, we haven't written any articles specifically about fitting 33" tires without any lift, but I ran them on my little red Tacoma and the Donahoe Tacoma for a while. The red truck rode at stock height and the Donahoe truck was obviously lifted, but they both need the exact same tire clearance. It doesn't matter how much you lift a truck or what the ride height is. Full compression is where tire clearance matters.

The best way to do this is put the vehicle on jack-stands, remove the coil-overs, reinstall the wheel/tire and then cycle the suspension towards full compression. You will notice rubbing on some of the plastic panels and the pinch-weld on the firewall, etc., but after a little bit of careful trimming and hammering the tires will clear at full compression and lock-to-lock steering without any noticable interference.

The same process/advise applies to any vehicle/tire size/suspension type. For the rear suspension, you only have to remove your leaf-springs, disassemble the pack and then reinstall the main leaf spring (maybe the second spring too, depending on the truck and the leaf-pack) on the truck. Then you can cycle the suspension with a floor-jack to determine the PERFECT shock placement or check for body clearance, etc. It's time-consuming, but it's better than a pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey approach to shck placement, tire/fender clearance, etc.

Hope that helps. If this is a topic that enough people are interested in, maybe we can try to write-up something Tacoma-specific. We are going to publish an article that covers the major points of this type of work (applied to out Donahoe Tacoma-length leafspring-equipped 1st gen. 4Runner) with Off Road magazine sometime in the next few months.


That would be great!!!! Do it on an 04 xtra cab:)

Seriously, Tacoma specific would be great, I really dont want to lift and have balked at spending a small fortune to get 3 lousy inches to fit tires 2/3 inches larger tires...

JESSE_at_TLT
05-09-2005, 06:22 PM
Well, here's a start (http://www.off-road.com/toyota/projects/tacoma/firewall_clearance/). This article was written about installing 35" tires on our long-travel Tacoma, but the process is very similar, expect that you don't need to cut anything (expect a little plastic) to fit 33x10.5" tires.

expeditionswest
05-09-2005, 06:25 PM
Scott,
I was checking out your write up on your rear suspension, I have a few questions on your installation.
Moving the axle forward .5" like you did, do you have to do any type of modifications to the drive shaft since your axle is now .5" closer? Also did take off one spring, put on the new deaver 10 leaf, ratchet the axle forward on that side, then do the same on the opposite side? Or did you take off both springs put on the new ones and then move the axle forward and then install the center bolts?
Thanks,
-Mick

Hi Mick,

The .5" movement does not create an issue. It is within the allowable tolerance of the drive shaft. In addition, the suspension is also lifted, which also extends the drive shaft slightly, recovering some of the compression.

I installed the springs one side at a time; however, I did loosen the u-bolt on the other side to allow the axle to move fore and aft... When you say center bolts I am assuming you mean the axle to spring u-bolts. The spring pack center bolts are delivered installed from Deaver and do not need to be removed or otherwise modified.

Hope this helps :)