: Why bpv Bracket


tumor
05-02-2005, 11:44 AM
I did a search and people talked about have it or not have it but what would happen if i didn't have it. or if i had it how would i know it is working or not??

spill_02
05-02-2005, 11:48 AM
check this out
http://www.bajataco.com/Brakes3.html
i dont think it hurts if you dont have one either, cuz i dont have one installed, too lazy to do it

TacoCrazy
05-02-2005, 12:05 PM
The BPV adjusts the pressure to the rear brakes when the vehicle is loaded, when the truck's rear susp. is lifted the BPV sees that as a "no-load" condition therefore reducing the rear brake pressure and forcing the front brakes to do more work...If you want to maintain a good bias between front and rear brakes use a BPV relocation bracket with a corresponding length as your rear lift..

StemsCornfedTaco
05-06-2005, 08:40 PM
The BPV adjusts the pressure to the rear brakes when the vehicle is loaded, when the truck's rear susp. is lifted the BPV sees that as a "no-load" condition therefore reducing the rear brake pressure and forcing the front brakes to do more work...If you want to maintain a good bias between front and rear brakes use a BPV relocation bracket with a corresponding length as your rear lift..

So how ever much lift you put on the rear of your truck, thats how big the BVP bracket needs to be?

GOT COPE?
05-07-2005, 12:39 AM
It is important to have a BPV!

When you do a suspension lift, how ever many inches you raise the rear you should raise the BPV bracket the same.

When you put a load in the truck bed, the suspension sags from the weight and pushes the BP arm down causing the braking bias to send more braking power to the rear. And it does the opposite...

When you lift the rear, w/o adjusting the BPV bracket, the BP will believe your rear is lighter than it really is, therefore causing less braking power to be sent to the rear and putting unecessary strain on the front brakes. The front brakes already have the majority of the braking strain on them. And to neglect adding a raised BPV bracket not only adds strain to the front but is unsafe IMO.

Say you lift the rear 3" then put a large load in the bed that sags the suspension 3" putting it at stock height. W/o the raised bracket the BP system is going to account for stock height and will not account for the load in the rear that it should be sending more braking power to.

hytenor
05-07-2005, 01:49 AM
I did a search and people talked about have it or not have it but what would happen if i didn't have it. or if i had it how would i know it is working or not??

it is only useful if you want your truck to stop in the shortest possible amount of road ;) W/o raising it to match the amount of lift you add, the rear brakes are next to useless putting all your stopping duties on the fronts.

GOT COPE?
05-07-2005, 02:46 AM
or if i had it how would i know it is working or not??

BTW you do have one. Its not is it working but how well it is working. When it is not adjusted to the amount of lift you may notice (depending on how hard you're braking) you truck doesnt stop as well or as quickly. If you are loaded down you will feel as if you are being "pushed". Almost like stopping with a trailer w/ no trailer brakes.

GOT COPE?
05-07-2005, 03:02 AM
Sheesh I thought of an easier to understand example. Similar to my previous maybe the numbers will help. I may pretty much repeating myself but I hope it helps.

Im not sure what the factory sets the BP system at but lets say its 70% front 30% rear.
Lift it 3" neglect BPV lift bracket.
The system now "thinks" you are lighter in the rear therefore adjusting to 85/15.
Now an extra 15% of the work is put onto the front brakes.

Toyota set the BP system at 70/30 and designed it to work this way.

The difference of having one may not show under normal braking and/or w/o a load. Its when you brake hard when it definately shows.

Remember 70/30 stock, unloaded.

Say you put 500lbs in the bed, stock height. The BP adjusts to 60/40 to compensate.

So now you lift it and again neglect a BPV bracket. So unloaded the BP now "thinks" 80/20.

Add 500lbs again and it adjusts to 70/30 when it really needs to be 60/40.

So the truck will be set to stop a stock unloaded 70/30 truck when it really need to be 60/40 correctly brake accordingly for the xtra 500lbs in the bed.

Again, my numbers are examples, not factory spec. But the theory is correct.

And I promise if you off-road you will eventually be going on trips camping or overnight stays, plus you will eventually have a nice collection of recovery gear and junk you like to haul around in case you need it. Thus the extra weight. And when you have to slam on the brakes you'll appreciate having the correct brake bias.