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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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Garage Door Insulation

I have a 2 car garage with a sectional roll-up door. Because it is facing south, during the summer time, it's impossible to work in there from 1pm till midnight, just too damn hot. I did a little research, this company came up: Texas Garages. they have the common foam panels also I'm more interested in the reflective foil type insulation. Anybody has any first hand dope on how effictive of this stuff?

http://www.texasgarages.com/insulation.htm


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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 06:50 AM
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I would like to know as well. I'm in the same state and in the same boat

Nathan (tejas), did you insulate?

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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 07:26 AM
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I've never used the reflective stuff except to insulate cars and camelbacks from the sun, but I can say a heavily insulated garage door works wonders for temperature control. My garage is much more stable...but I went from a shitty paper-thin sheetmetal door to a heavy gauge door, double walled, with 2" of foam core.

Start by insulating your door...you can get foam sheets at the hardware store for about ten bucks each...stick them on the back of your existing door, it'll make a huge difference and the weight is negligible, so you won't need to change the spring over the door.

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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 07:34 AM Thread Starter
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the reason i'm looking into the foil type is because it can reflect the radiant heat in some degree. right now it feels like under sunlight by standing about a foot behine the closed garage door. it could help keeping warm in the winter, too. again, i have no experience with it first hand.

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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 07:53 AM
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My garage faces north so the sun on the door is not really a problem, but since it's over 100 outside, any radiant heat blocking helps. Next thing is to insulate the attic, which covers half the garage. The other half is my upstairs living room.

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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 08:26 AM
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My garage faces north so the sun on the door is not really a problem, but since it's over 100 outside, any radiant heat blocking helps. Next thing is to insulate the attic, which covers half the garage. The other half is my upstairs living room.
that kind of heat or cold you need to insulate what you can no doubt
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 09:54 AM
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I switched mine from an insulated door to an un insulated and noticed zero difference at all. As the guy pointed out the all gaps in the door, adding an inch of foam in the middle of it will do nothing. To keep the heat out, you have to keep the sun off the door to begin with. I have thought about adding a roll up screen in front of it to keep the sun off of it, but think that might look too ghetto. Plus sweat makes clean up easier.
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 10:26 AM
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I've never used the reflective stuff except to insulate cars and camelbacks from the sun, but I can say a heavily insulated garage door works wonders for temperature control. My garage is much more stable...but I went from a shitty paper-thin sheetmetal door to a heavy gauge door, double walled, with 2" of foam core.

Start by insulating your door...you can get foam sheets at the hardware store for about ten bucks each...stick them on the back of your existing door, it'll make a huge difference and the weight is negligible, so you won't need to change the spring over the door.

-Sean
Same here. Our new house has a foam-core insulated garage door and it's remarkable how much it helps.
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 10:27 AM
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My garage faces north so the sun on the door is not really a problem, but since it's over 100 outside, any radiant heat blocking helps. Next thing is to insulate the attic, which covers half the garage. The other half is my upstairs living room.
Your attic isn't insulated?
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 10:28 AM
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the reason i'm looking into the foil type is because it can reflect the radiant heat in some degree. right now it feels like under sunlight by standing about a foot behine the closed garage door. it could help keeping warm in the winter, too. again, i have no experience with it first hand.
Yeah, but you're not gonna get enough direct sunlight to make any difference in the winter time anyway...well, maybe a little in Texas.
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post #11 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 10:30 AM
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that stuff's pretty decent, but I couldn't say it's any better than the rigid foam they put in there. You need to also look at the insulation the attic above your garage, if it's a single story house. Most every house I go in on claims has no insulation over the garage. It's usually just not necessary since most people are only in the garage long enough to walk from the door to their car when they leave and from the car to the door when they get home. It's amazing what a difference it makes when you insulate the ceiling over the garage, since something like 75% of heat/cooling loss is through the ceiling.

edit: there ya go Hoss. Pretty common construction technique.

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post #12 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 10:53 AM
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Your attic isn't insulated?
Not the garage attic. There isn't even any plywood flooring up there.

I have a 2 story. Garage is on the left side. Right half is under the house, the left side has it's own roofing. Under that roofing they never thought to put insulation. They just sheetrocked the garage and called it a day

I need to take everything out up there and lay down fiberglass and plywood. Might be real nice to put a thermally controlled fan in the attic, pushing out of the attic vent. I might just put a manual fan instead, on the light switch for the 11x7 shop at the back. Haven't made a decision yet.

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post #13 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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I called the garage company who installed my door, got to know mine has already been insulated but with a shitty thin layer of plastic. I'm gonna buy a piece of 4'x8' x1" foam panel from HD to test out on one section see if makes any difference.

I have 10' ceilling in the garage and it's insulated, at least that part I don't have to worry about.

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post #14 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by notyourmomslx450 View Post
that stuff's pretty decent, but I couldn't say it's any better than the rigid foam they put in there. You need to also look at the insulation the attic above your garage, if it's a single story house. Most every house I go in on claims has no insulation over the garage. It's usually just not necessary since most people are only in the garage long enough to walk from the door to their car when they leave and from the car to the door when they get home. It's amazing what a difference it makes when you insulate the ceiling over the garage, since something like 75% of heat/cooling loss is through the ceiling.

edit: there ya go Hoss. Pretty common construction technique.
that is how my garage is, fully sheetrocked but no insulation. I would love to insulate my garage attic, but I don't want to pull up the plywood decking to do it.

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post #15 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:29 AM
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there are companies that can put blown in insulation w/ out tearing out the decking above. They make an injection hole in the drywall or the plywood and blow in the insulation through that.

My in-laws just finished building a house, and their insulation is amazing. They did the expanding foam insulation on the underside of the roof decking, and their attic is almost as cool as the rest of the house. The 2nd floor a/c isn't even turned on, and it's completely comfortable even in good ol' 100 degree heat. Basically, their house is like a huge coleman cooler.

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post #16 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:31 AM
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there are companies that can put blown in insulation w/ out tearing out the decking above. They make an injection hole in the drywall or the plywood and blow in the insulation through that.

My in-laws just finished building a house, and their insulation is amazing. They did the expanding foam insulation on the underside of the roof decking, and their attic is almost as cool as the rest of the house. The 2nd floor a/c isn't even turned on, and it's completely comfortable even in good ol' 100 degree heat. Basically, their house is like a huge coleman cooler.
how expensive is this expanding foam insulation? what happens if you have to replace a section of plywood when you have your roof replaced?

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post #17 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:35 AM
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I want to know about that as well.

If you lose some ply, you lose the insulation for that part as well. Just takes a small respray.

Only issue I can see is if a nail slides out over time and you get a leak, the ply might rot before you know about it.

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post #18 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:48 AM
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Yeah, plastic sheeting != insulation.

2" foam core will help with the feeling of standing in the sun behind a closed garage door...in fact, it'll help quite a bit. In addition, like BBH said, close the door, turn off the lights, and look around the door for places where you've convective transfer (ie gaps). I figure it's good to have some gaps top and bottom for some circulation and in the event of a gas leak (whatever sort of gas) so it doesn't build in the garage, but they don't need to be huge.

I was able to fix a problem gap between the seal and the door with a piece of sticky backed, closed cell foam against the frame around the door...just gotta make sure the door won't tear it, opening and closing.

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post #19 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 11:55 AM
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Only issue I can see is if a nail slides out over time and you get a leak, the ply might rot before you know about it.
If your roof was installed properly, with the correct shingle fasteners, nail-pops should be a non issue. You might just have to get up on the roof and check a couple of times a year.

On the expanding foam, I'm not sure how much it is, nor do I know how easy a retrofit is w/ that stuff. I know I want it in my house. Since it was built in 1945, i'm sure there's no insulation in the walls (but it takes me 5 minutes to get to downtown). On the plywood issue, as long as your roof isn't leaking when you put it on, there's no reason for it to start unless you have wind/hail damage, or you let your roof go to shit. I think it would be worth it just for the effect it would have on your heating/cooling bills and the lifespan of your heating/cooling system. I want to do the roof and the walls w/ it.

Here's a couple of companies I found in Houston:

http://foamhouston.com/
http://www.a1foam.com/

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post #20 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 12:29 PM
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I have a 2 car garage that faces west, and in the afternoon till late in the evening I had sunlight directly on the door. I biult a 2 car carport over the driveway in front of the garage door, and it made a world of difference. I can actually work in the garage w/o dealing with the radiant heat... its still hot, but nearly as bad.
Its an expensive fix, but it serves a double purpose.... I can work in the driveway even when it rains, and it is great when I wash my vehicles.... Im not in the sun dying of heat stroke!
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post #21 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 03:13 PM Thread Starter
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I think I'm getting somewhere, cheap!!

I went to HD this afternoon, for $10 bought 1" thick 4'x8' Dow SUPER TUFF-R insulation board. it has reflective paper on each side, one is blue another is silver, bingo! spent a long time using the rule of measure 10 times and cut once, made 4 panels, put them in like sliding doors, push up, pull down, they sit really really tight. I'm getting 3 more boards tomorrow. Here is what's look like:



after let is sit for 2 hours, the room tempture 3 feet away from the door is 89F


garage door section with out insulation: 89F


garage door secotion covered with insulation right next to the previous one: 82F



I can have it all covered up for $40 after tax with 10% off coupon from post office. one side note, it's very very light weight, so I wn't have to worry about it adding stress to the lifting motor.

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post #22 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 03:30 PM
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You did it wrong though. You're supposed to cover the frame bars, too. Otherwise you negate the reflection, since you basically have hot (and possibly hotter, now) metal exchanging heat to inside air, just in a smaller area.

Look closer at the top picture^^

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post #23 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 03:45 PM Thread Starter
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that will be the next task, though, after all the door sections are finished. it's not possible with what i have, different panel construction than the one on top. for now, there isn't any type of adhesive involved, i have not yet figure out how to do the crossbars. the 89F tempture i took was not on bare metal, it has already been covered by the factory insulation, it's just not thick enough.

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post #24 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 04:16 PM
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Ah I see. It should be easy enough to overlap thin strips over the crossbars or something.

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post #25 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-25-2009, 07:20 PM
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....Nathan (tejas), did you insulate?
Not yet...sorry for the late response, just returned from a trip from Mexico.

My garage door, outside walls and ceiling are not insulated. Only the interior walls to my home. Not yet sure if I will insulate..but if I do, I would replace the whole door. But that would only be good if you also insulate your walls and ceiling.

When I lived in NC, I did the same thing as 99sr54wd, the temperature also reduced a little, but not enough to justify the cost and time to install.

If you are going to do this, do it right. So if I do this, I would replace the doors and for the outside wall (only one), I could do blow in insulation.
Then the ceiling is easy to access to lay down batting.

Then to finally make it worth it, install a mini-split HVAC system for the garage only.

At least that is my plan....yours will be different based on needs, location and amount of money you want to spend.

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post #26 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-26-2009, 12:08 PM
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My old POS door already had foam in the crossbars...they called it "partially insulated." I called it crap. If yours are already done, no need...otherwise, squirt some expanding foam in the holes and kick back with a beer in your 10* cooler garage.

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post #27 of 29 (permalink) Old 08-02-2018, 05:39 AM
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I apologize for the bump...
I've been battling heat in my shop since I moved into my current home eight years ago. I live in SoCal, and my garage door faces west. The afternoon sun has always heated up the shop to levels that make me spend less time in the shop.

I added a mini-split HVAC, and that helped enormously. But in the summer, when the outdoor temps can get over 90 degrees (sometimes over 100), and the afternoon sun is beating on the garage door, my mini-split had no hope of keeping up, and shop temps would climb.

I insulated the walls and ceiling, and that definitely helped. But my mini-split was still no match for the summer afternoon heat.

So, I got a thermal imaging camera. I learned a few important things that have helped get the heat under control.

First, the uninsulated steel garage doors were acting as a giant radiator. I knew that, but I didn't realize just how much that contributed to the problem. On those 90 degree days with the sun beating on the door, the temp of the outside of the garage doors would get over 120 degrees. The inside of the doors would get over 110. Since my shop is a 3-car garage, that's a lot of heat! No wonder the inside of the shop kept getting so warm.

I bought those garage door insulation kits from a big box store like this https://mechanicguides.com/best-gara...nsulation-kit/ (I think HD). That made a significant difference, but the doors were still a big radiator. Instead of the inside of the door registering 110 degrees, it would get up to the high 90s. That's a 10-15 degree drop, but my mini-split still struggled to take all that heat out of the shop.

A few months ago, I upgraded my garage doors to some of those R-18 super-insulated garage doors (with no windows). That has made an enormous difference. We haven't yet had any 90+ degree weather this year, but so far, the inside of my garage doors has stayed pretty close to the ambient temp in my shop. So, whatever heat the sun is putting onto the garage door's exterior is mostly not making its way into the shop.

People get fixated on seals. In some circumstances, bad seals can be the culprit. But keep in mind that the job of the seals is to keep the heat/cold in the AMBIENT air outside from getting inside. When you have a West-facing garage door and the sun is beating on your garage door in the afternoon, the ambient outside temperate is really not the problem. The problem is that the sun is super-heating the exterior surface of your garage door to a temperature that can be 20-30 degrees hotter than the outside air. That's a much bigger problem than bad seals. I'm not saying that seals don't matter; I am saying that getting as much insulation as possible on the surface of your garage door is much more critical than seals for controlling heat if you have a West-facing door and you want to keep your shop cool. At least, that has been my experience.

The thermal imaging camera also gave me some additional insights. I had extensive fluorescent lighting throughout the shop, and the camera showed just how much heat those were putting out. So, I changed to LED lighting. Enormous improvement.
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post #28 of 29 (permalink) Old 08-02-2018, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iylildi View Post
I apologize for the bump...
I've been battling heat in my shop since I moved into my current home eight years ago. I live in SoCal, and my garage door faces west. The afternoon sun has always heated up the shop to levels that make me spend less time in the shop.

I added a mini-split HVAC, and that helped enormously. But in the summer, when the outdoor temps can get over 90 degrees (sometimes over 100), and the afternoon sun is beating on the garage door, my mini-split had no hope of keeping up, and shop temps would climb.

I insulated the walls and ceiling, and that definitely helped. But my mini-split was still no match for the summer afternoon heat.

So, I got a thermal imaging camera. I learned a few important things that have helped get the heat under control.

First, the uninsulated steel garage doors were acting as a giant radiator. I knew that, but I didn't realize just how much that contributed to the problem. On those 90 degree days with the sun beating on the door, the temp of the outside of the garage doors would get over 120 degrees. The inside of the doors would get over 110. Since my shop is a 3-car garage, that's a lot of heat! No wonder the inside of the shop kept getting so warm.

I bought those garage door insulation kits from a big box store like this https://mechanicguides.com/best-gara...nsulation-kit/ (I think HD). That made a significant difference, but the doors were still a big radiator. Instead of the inside of the door registering 110 degrees, it would get up to the high 90s. That's a 10-15 degree drop, but my mini-split still struggled to take all that heat out of the shop.

A few months ago, I upgraded my garage doors to some of those R-18 super-insulated garage doors (with no windows). That has made an enormous difference. We haven't yet had any 90+ degree weather this year, but so far, the inside of my garage doors has stayed pretty close to the ambient temp in my shop. So, whatever heat the sun is putting onto the garage door's exterior is mostly not making its way into the shop.

People get fixated on seals. In some circumstances, bad seals can be the culprit. But keep in mind that the job of the seals is to keep the heat/cold in the AMBIENT air outside from getting inside. When you have a West-facing garage door and the sun is beating on your garage door in the afternoon, the ambient outside temperate is really not the problem. The problem is that the sun is super-heating the exterior surface of your garage door to a temperature that can be 20-30 degrees hotter than the outside air. That's a much bigger problem than bad seals. I'm not saying that seals don't matter; I am saying that getting as much insulation as possible on the surface of your garage door is much more critical than seals for controlling heat if you have a West-facing door and you want to keep your shop cool. At least, that has been my experience.

The thermal imaging camera also gave me some additional insights. I had extensive fluorescent lighting throughout the shop, and the camera showed just how much heat those were putting out. So, I changed to LED lighting. Enormous improvement.
Why does your profile say Canada but your post indicate you live in Socal?
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post #29 of 29 (permalink) Old 04-23-2019, 11:29 AM
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To install Reflective foil on Garage doors that reduce the radiant heat transfer an enclosed space. The smartest place to install reflective foil is in Garage Doors, wall or as sarking under the roof, as it reflects radiant heat away from the interior of the Garage in summer.

https://gryphongaragedoors.com

[/QUOTE]
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