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On a similar topic...funny how a certain somebody said he would never do 35s on a Tacoma, because he could do everything with 33s, and that was just a stupid "big truck guy" thing....and then after he did it, suddenly its cool, everybody else thinks its a good idea. Good luck with that. Your truck was breaking non-stop to the point that you almost wanted to quit wheeling....but now you're getting even bigger tires, based on one guy saying he "quit braking with bigger tires". Yeah...right.
If i wanted more of your fucking lip, I would of jiggled my zipper :jack:


Your bullshit here is in no way related to this topic.

I only did 35's because i got them for almost $500 cheaper than it would of cost me to replace my 255/85's (which would of been most ideal).


PBkid,

The kit will likely come with shocks. While they're not the best out there, they do the job well and they function. I ran the OME shocks on my truck (still am in the front) and wheeled the hell out of it; it did just fine. The only thing I didnt like about them is the dampening wasnt there and with any sort of weight over the rear it would just turn to mush and wasn't stable at all.

They'll also limit some of your droop travel (about 2" worth, at least on a Tacoma) however, again, not a really big issue. It's something that could definitely be upgraded in the future. However, i wouldn't suggest stock shocks with a lift at all. They'll be way too short.

Manual hub trucks are more prone to breaking at the outer stub shaft due to it being a smaller overall diameter, however it will save your boots because the CV's wont be turning on the highway and rubbing on each other all of the time. They'll only be rubbing when the truck is in 4wd, offroad or in the snow. Where as an ADD truck they will rub all of the time no matter what. When you break a CV there is about a 98% chance that it will not effect the boot at all.

Also, it's not overly common to break them in the stub shaft. Despite was asshat above says, I wheeled my truck HARD and beat on it for a year (wheeling Carnage 2/3 times a week, moab twice, holy cross back to back, tons of other trails) and NEVER broke a CV. My front diff is in less than OK shape, and the result is quite a few broken axles. Open front trucks usually break them in the joint. Most of the time even locked front trucks break them in the joint, there is just something weird going on with my truck that I have not been capable of diagnosing just yet.

You can definitely get away with running 35's on IFS, there's the common belief that you must solid axle to wheel the hard trails, and the big lines. That's not the case. IFS definitely isn't the best or most ideal setup for hard trails, and rock crawling; however it does the job. If you're going to regear, it doesn't matter what ratio you choose. It's all the same cost to do it, a 5.29 ratio might be $10-$15 more than a 4.88 but it's nothing substantial.

I'm not too sure on the year of your runner which may determine this. A lot of people will suggest 4.88's to you for 33's. Personally I'd suggest 5.29's (especially with a 3.slow) since we're all already at a loss of power/torque due to altitude. In reality, a stock truck geared to 4.56 up here is about the same 'umph' as the same stock truck at sea level with 4.10's. Also, 5.29's wouldn't be a bad idea because it would save you $$$$ in the long run when you solid axle, since solid axle will for sure bring larger tires you'll have 1 less diff to regear.

Lots of arguments are made against 5.29's with 33's as far as gas mileage goes, however I was avg. 18-19, and my best was 20. This was also not really driving "conservatively" (80mph, shifting at higher RPM, etc.).
 

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My views on breaking CVs are... Sometimes too much skinny pedal.

Or what I believe is the case more times than not. A combination of too much droop and cranking the steering hard to the side. This will give you the most severe CV angles.

As far as front shocks. The stock length shocks, which is what I'm running, will give plenty of droop. Also you can't get much more droop without the UCA coming in contact with the coils. I don't believe that you can get longer front shocks.
 

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Nate - he has a 3rd gen, so Tacoma (not preTaco) engines. 4 cyl 4Runners are pretty rare, so I would assume it's the 3.4 and therefore can get away with the one ratio higher (lower numerically) gear choices. Good point about altitude compensation though - you will get better mileage being lighter on the throttle than the higher RPM would require.
 

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My views on breaking CVs are... Sometimes too much skinny pedal.

Or what I believe is the case more times than not. A combination of too much droop and cranking the steering hard to the side. This will give you the most severe CV angles.

As far as front shocks. The stock length shocks, which is what I'm running, will give plenty of droop. Also you can't get much more droop without the UCA coming in contact with the coils. I don't believe that you can get longer front shocks.
See, mine breaks under the complete opposite of what you just listed. On the rocks, I am not a skinny pedal wheeler. In the snow (where i use LOTS of it) i've only broken 1 CV and it was an obvious cause (lifted a tire up out of the snow, and when it came down HARD back on it, it was on a rock and caught full traction. Snap).

7 out of 9 have broken when suspension is at almost rest, 1 when steering was full lock, full droop, and 1 that i talked about above. I'm also not breaking joints, i agree 100% with you that is what usually causes a CV to break in the joint.

The stock front shock length is good, but the dampening isn't quite there. I should of been more clear in my previous post, i was referring to rear shocks. Not front. However, in the kit he is talking about purchasing it comes with new front shocks, rear shocks, etc.

Nate - he has a 3rd gen, so Tacoma (not preTaco) engines. 4 cyl 4Runners are pretty rare, so I would assume it's the 3.4 and therefore can get away with the one ratio higher (lower numerically) gear choices. Good point about altitude compensation though - you will get better mileage being lighter on the throttle than the higher RPM would require.
Cool, i was pretty sure he had a 3.4, but wasnt 100% sure.

FWIW: I absolutely LOVE my 5.29's with the 3.4 when i was on 255/85/16's. And what troy says about throttle angle is true.

Essentially, it means with the extra gearing you'll (for example) only have to use 20% throttle to maintain 65, where with 4.88's you may have to use 30% throttle. Since fuel is injected based on how far open the throttle plate is, how much air is passing over the MAF, and what the o2 sensor reads in the exhaust it's much more important to run a lower throttle angle for better fuel mileage.

Obviously, a higher RPM will burn slightly more fuel, but in this case it offsets itself for the better by using a smaller throttle percentage.
 

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I don't believe there are upgrades that can be easily done to a 3rd gen Runner/Tacoma rack without finding a complete replacement rack and tie rods that are actually somewhat strong. So if you have 35s say goodbye to your tie rods first (pretty quickly) then your steering rack and eventually your steering pump. And this isn't just web wheeling like the rest of these guys who haven't had personal experience with it. I wheeled 35s for a year. Wouldn't do it again. I never popped a CV, so I clearly wasn't beating the shit out of it.

spot on with the tie rods.... though with a manual transmission you can get an automatic radiator and use the tranny rail to cool the power steering, helps to save racks and pumps a bit if you really want to push tires that big. but there aren't really any changes you can make outside of that, people have tried and there isn't much you can do
 

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Discussion Starter #26
wow, a lot of info there in 1 day.

it sounds like its most logical for me to stay at 33's until i can afford to make this into just a trail toy... work on upgrading body armor and such in the meantime.

basically, i get that its possible, but not such a great idea for a daily driver because the risk level that it brings for breaking things. especially for a college student. :2cents:

and those are definately some good points. that steering is going to be heavily affected due to the weight of 35's. and that with a throttle position sensor its all about the angle of the throttle on gas mileage.

thanks again guys. sounds like 33's, toytec lift, and trailgear sliders should get me through moab in one piece ;)
 

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Yup, I didn't realize you were on a college budget, then I for SURE would have said stay at 33's... and worry about:

1) Armour FIRST
2) Gearing
3) Lift
4) Lockers
5) Tire size
6) SA options (With upgraded stearing)

And you guys call me a web wheeler. My junk is just broke and I shouldn't be driving... LMAO! You forgot all those years I wheeled an Isuzu.
 

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I side with QuickDraw on this, but that reply was just funny and had me actually lol'ing
May be so, but given my circumstances it was cheaper for me to go 35's. I'm going to be breaking shit anyways (as it has shown). 1 guy i had talked to said he hasn't broken a cv ever since hes ran TSL's (which is what he said, is it true. Dunno. Never said that IS the case, just spreading the info i had found. Which the guy actually WHEELS his shit so i find his statement reputable.). Nor did I ever claim anything about my steering being ok, or not having a problem with it. Bottom line, I feel my trucks done right, it's not half assed. I don't try to weld cast pieces to my frame for recovery points, that will obviously just get ripped off. I dont put 3" of body lift on trying to clear bigger tires, and still have rub.... i could go on. But i'll quit cluttering this thread.

Really, I don't even want to argue about it anymore. I could give a fuck less (in the end, i have, and will continue to be out wheeling my shit more than he has), I'm just sick of him running his mouth whenever hes behind a computer but wont say shit when he sees me. :rolleyes:
 

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And you guys call me a web wheeler. My junk is just broke and I shouldn't be driving... LMAO! You forgot all those years I wheeled an Isuzu.

i only called you one cause you called me one first :D


i dunno how essential protection is as a first mod. most of my body damage came from carnage.... and that isn't an issue anymore. not that i dont think you need it but for most stuff sliders will cover the important stuff and then some lift and decent tires. ive been rocking 4.10's with 33's for a long time and gearing hasn't been an issue....
 

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. ive been rocking 4.10's with 33's for a long time and gearing hasn't been an issue....
I thought the same thing too, until the last year when i started trying harder obsticales. Now i wish i would have regeared long ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
yup.. i have plenty of money needed to spend on the lift, sliders and tires..

then a rear bumper, then tube fender flares.... skid plates...

gearing... and so on lol
 

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I would search and do some more research before you start spending that money. sounds like you have a lot you havent learned yet on your runner.
 

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I would search and do some more research before you start spending that money. sounds like you have a lot you havent learned yet on your runner.


x a brazillion



i would drive it first on something easy just to get a feel for what you have. there are numerous different suspension options that will all ride a bit different and will depend on how much you have it loaded down. also keep in mind that armor weighs a bit more.... troys runner weighs like 6k at least.... and if you plan on carrying a spare of every drive component with you to fix on the trail then maybe some beefy rear coils?

here are just some random things to think about...

square or round sliders?
body lift and clocked tcase? Flat belly pan?
stinger?
winch? what size?
on board air? co2 or compressors?
 

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Guys, remember Jack used to wheel an Isuzu Vehicross a good amount. But those rigs usually seemed to be better at Baja style stuff. Still he has a trip planned for Moab this May, (To see his Isuzu buddies - like I used to) so he does want to get some stuff squared away before then.
 

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If you're modding for function and fun while 'wheeling, I say:

armor
gears/lockers
lift/tires when what you got are worn out

The first two will you get you down the trail farther and having more fun than the third will any day. IMHO taking body damage (and especially glass damage with a 4Runner) gets to be no fun in a hurry.
 

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A few thoughts from a guy in a similar situation, and has a few things done. I run 305/70/16, which is just a tad smaller than 33x12.5, on a 4" pro comp drop backet lift. I had to cut a fair amount of stuff out of my wheel wells to get them to fit (mostly just hammering/ cutting on pinch weld and surrounding area).

What I have noticed in my case is that off road clearance is good everywhere but under the front diff. I bang on shit all the time there, on stuff guys with a 31 and an inch or two (or three) of CO lift don't. I really don't like that you are "getting clearance by fitting a larger tire", in most cases an inch or two more of tire, but losing clearance by dropping the bracket and skid 4". (I bought the truck with the DB on it, I didn't know any better:mad:. Sue me.) So a SAS is somewhere down the road for me since you can't undo a DB.

On the plus side, I have only really hit the diff skid, and my sliders have only been used a few times. I have not needed under armor yet. What the rest of these guys and gals have said is true about lockers and armor. With me being open/open its tough to get to a place where I need the sliders and armor:rolleyes: So I would if I had to do it over, get locked and armored, and...

Gears. My 4.10's on 33s suck where I live. (mountains) It (3.4l) drives like my '88 4cyl. did, i.e. 50-60mph at 3-4k rpm up the hills. With all the shit hanging off my truck I get about 16mpg. I like where troy is coming from in that you don't have to use the gas as much thus saving money on fuel.

For the record, and when I get money, I will do (in order unless I get a deal) a regear/locker, then a SAS. Bumpers I'm hoping to have soon but that falls under deal category. Just my:2cents:
 

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With me being open/open its tough to get to a place where I need the sliders and armor:rolleyes: So I would if I had to do it over, get locked and armored, and...
You just haven't wheeled hard enough trails then :D

Seriously, when you're open/open, you only really only have 2 tools - line selection and throttle. You can only choose the best line that's there - the rest of it is momentum and bouncing through stuff, which in my experience, results in MORE body damage.
 

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You're right, and I have gotten a little too bouncy for my liking. I really need to quit being lazy and take the topper off for wheeling. I have nightmares about breaking one of those windows. Almost did it on Mill Creek last year.
 
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