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Discussion Starter #1
Basically I have an '03 Tacoma with 16" stock alloy wheels on it. They look horrible. I don't have a garage to park in and after 9 winters in NY they look really bad. Are they a lost cause, or would sanding and rustoleum provide any sort of reasonable results? New rims aren't really something I'm going to run out and buy right now, it's just a utility vehicle for me, but if I can make it look a little nicer for cheap I'd like to.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Cool, I'm just wondering if sanding the surface will make it look ok, or if it's too far gone.
 

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ummm... you haven't shown a picture of how bad they look ?

Are they pitted into the alloy... (lots of sanding there)
or is it just that the clear coat/paint is fubar'd ?
 

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Sand the face of the wheel down with 200 grit, wipe the wheel down with prep solvent, and spray with a few coats of clear and they will look new again. Or you could paint them black or gunmetal using same process
 

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I have Pro Comps now for less backspacing, but I had the 16" alloys in Mass for years, even took the truck out on the ORV beaches. Wanted to keep them as spares, but the Front wheels looked gone. I sanded down the worst wheel, started with 220 and brought it down to 600 grit... The pitting is pretty much all gone. Guarantee if I sprayed them with a good primer and some paint they would look almost like new.

This is where the pitting was the worst:
 

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If there were someone in your area that could glass bead your wheels for a reasonable price, I would do that. You don't even have to take the tires off. Then you would have a nice clean surface with a "tooth" for the paint to stick to. Prime and paint to your liking. The only tricky part will be finding a place that has a blast cabinet big enough to fit your wheel and tire together. You might be able to have a place sand blast them with the tires on as well, but that may be risky to your tires and/or valve stems. Of course, you could spend a little time with some duct tape and tape the hell out of the tires and valve stems before having them sand blasted. That would work great, and would protect your stems/tires.
 

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steel wool, primer then duplicolor aluminum wheel paint.
mine have held up great for years now, in maine and mass.
 

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That sounds like work, but the less expensive route. I'm sure glad I don't live in a place that salts the roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That sounds like work, but the less expensive route. I'm sure glad I don't live in a place that salts the roads.
Hey everyone, thanks for the advice.... I forgot about this thread and might try this route out instead of replacing the wheels if everyone is saying it's doable. I will try to find somebody who does glass beading, if not I can sand by hand.
 

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I did this... $50 sandblast (aggresive to eat out the pits), etch primer, Duplicolor rattle can color (deep gray graphite), clear coat, all with the tires installed and deflated. Pitch playing cards between rubber and wheel when painting for overspray. Spray the ctr caps but use plastic primer.
This has held up VERY good for three Minnesota salt winters.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I did this... $50 sandblast (aggresive to eat out the pits), etch primer, Duplicolor rattle can color (deep gray graphite), clear coat, all with the tires installed and deflated. Pitch playing cards between rubber and wheel when painting for overspray. Spray the ctr caps but use plastic primer.
This has held up VERY good for three Minnesota salt winters.
Did you sandblast with the tires still on?
 
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