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when adjusting them, makes turning of the spanner wrench much easier.
It will also prevent the adjustment collar from getting siezed on to the shock body. :)
 

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I would agree and add to use anti-seize on most threaded connections on your chassis or undercarriage. Just about anything I take apart under there after soaking, swearing, and busting knuckles on rusty threads goes back on with anti-seize.
 

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Well, as long as we're talking about the uses of anti-seize, I would add lug nuts/studs to the list. I decided to start doing this after my 4th stud snapped off. :)
 

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22RToy said:
I decided to start doing this after my 4th stud snapped off. :)
Are you properly torquing your lug nuts?
 

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ChargedTaco said:
when adjusting them, makes turning of the spanner wrench much easier.
It will also prevent the adjustment collar from getting siezed on to the shock body. :)
Definately a wise choice. stuff works great. I used it on my 92 chevy 4.3 and after having it for a few years I changed the plugs for the second time and wow was it worth putting that on there. I buy big tubes of that stuff before just about any project I do now.
 

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Never seize, is great!

22RToy said:
Well, as long as we're talking about the uses of anti-seize, I would add lug nuts/studs to the list. I decided to start doing this after my 4th stud snapped off. :)
I would also add to the surface of your rotors where the wheel makes contact for those of you who have alloy rims. Makes taking them off real simple. I've read a few post where people have found their front wheel literally fused to the brake rotor... My friend calls me the never sieze king because I use it like it's going out of style but when it comes time to take something appart, I get the last laugh. Especially here in Canada with all the road salt we use...
Every bit helps :D !
 

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22RToy said:
Well, as long as we're talking about the uses of anti-seize, I would add lug nuts/studs to the list. I decided to start doing this after my 4th stud snapped off. :)

this is probably the dumbest thing to do, you NEVER want to put any kind of lubrication on your wheel studs. if you torque them to the proper torque each time they are taken off you should never have any problems with them snapping off or stripping, unless you cannot screw a nut on straight. putting any kind of lubrication, yes thats what antiseize is in a way, on your studs can cause the wheel to fall off. and you dont want that now do you.
 

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BTW the #1 cause of spark plug seizing is not tightening to proper torque! Why? If the seal doesn't crush, carbon fills the threads due to a small leak. You still should use anti-seize.

Toyota does not recommend anti-seize on their wheel studs, but I do it anyways. NEVER had a problem, but be sure you don't put anti-seize on the washer where it touches the wheel! Then they might fall off, and you overtorque (stretch) the crap out of them. I also have aftermarket crap nuts though, I'd leave the stock stuff dry.

Not pulling this out of my ass, I worked on Toyotas professionally for 5 years...
 

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I Ate Your Taco said:
this is probably the dumbest thing to do, you NEVER want to put any kind of lubrication on your wheel studs. ...putting any kind of lubrication, yes thats what antiseize is in a way, on your studs can cause the wheel to fall off.
Wearing shoes can cause your feet to fall off. :rolleyes: But it's not very likely, if applied correctly.
 

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You should add anti seize to the braking surface of the rotors.......this will prolong brake pad life!!!
 

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grillmasterp said:
Are you properly torquing your lug nuts?
Old post, forgot about this one. Oops!

No, I am probably not torquing them properly, however I've always changed or rotated my own tires, and never had this problem with my old Toy. It's my observation that the newer nuts/studs are softer, and have a tendency to shred or fragment. When I snapped a stud, I was taking the nut off. The built up fragments created too much friction, kept getting tighter and tighter.

*snap*
 

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I Ate Your Taco said:
this is probably the dumbest thing to do, you NEVER want to put any kind of lubrication on your wheel studs. if you torque them to the proper torque each time they are taken off you should never have any problems with them snapping off or stripping, unless you cannot screw a nut on straight. putting any kind of lubrication, yes thats what antiseize is in a way, on your studs can cause the wheel to fall off. and you dont want that now do you.
Well, I'm not exactly using Teflon on my studs, though I do agree that anti seize feels slippery on the fingers. I had problems with my lug nuts seizing. So I decided to use anti SEIZE to prevent them from doing just that.
 

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At are shop we use this stuff called Fluid Film man it works the best you can watch it take the rust right off nuts and bolts juts gotta shake it before u use it, Once you use fluid film you never go back to anything else and its better then anti-sieze.
 

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I Ate Your Taco said:
this is probably the dumbest thing to do, you NEVER want to put any kind of lubrication on your wheel studs. if you torque them to the proper torque each time they are taken off you should never have any problems with them snapping off or stripping, unless you cannot screw a nut on straight. putting any kind of lubrication, yes thats what antiseize is in a way, on your studs can cause the wheel to fall off. and you dont want that now do you.
I've been running anti-seize on my wheel studs over the life of my last 3 Toyota trucks. Only time I had problems was before I started using anti-sieze and used to break studs that got rusted to the nuts.

I do keep them properly torqued, and check them frequently. And yes, I can screw a nut on straight.

Later,
....Mike
 

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Mike said:
I've been running anti-seize on my wheel studs over the life of my last 3 Toyota trucks. Only time I had problems was before I started using anti-sieze and used to break studs that got rusted to the nuts.

I do keep them properly torqued, and check them frequently. And yes, I can screw a nut on straight.

Later,
....Mike
Well that is the end of that! lol
 
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