TTORA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What is the best use for the two floor storage compartments that anyone has thought up? I have seen the cooler idea, but what else have you guys thought up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
I have a few Tow straps, shackles a reciver hook and some othe misc stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have an 8" Kicker CompVR subwoofer in the passenger side. Fills out my stereo system nicely, but doesn't shake the earth. There's a pic in my sig "Pics" link. Driver's side is just the jack and some jumper cables I crammed in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
augator said:
What is the best use for the two floor storage compartments that anyone has thought up? I have seen the cooler idea, but what else have you guys thought up?
Hiding drugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
ewarnerusa said:
I have an 8" Kicker CompVR subwoofer in the passenger side. Fills out my stereo system nicely, but doesn't shake the earth. There's a pic in my sig "Pics" link. Driver's side is just the jack and some jumper cables I crammed in there.
Is that the same one I've seen on E-bay, or is it some custom job? I've thought about replacing the bass tube behind the seat with that type of setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Breathegood said:
Is that the same one I've seen on E-bay, or is it some custom job? I've thought about replacing the bass tube behind the seat with that type of setup.
It is custom, but I got the idea from the ebay auction. It was $100 or something on ebay?!! Mine was made from scrap particle board in the garage.... I haven't really heard any bass tubes before, but I would guess that this cubby stealth plate setup is about equivalent. If you're into mirror shaking, glass flexing, earthquaking bass then you'll be disappointed with this setup. But for a single 8" it sounds great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
ewarnerusa said:
I have an 8" Kicker CompVR subwoofer in the passenger side.
Can you still use the seat with it installed like you have it? How much does it stick up from the board? I was thinking you could use a router and cut the mount surface down some so the speaker sits flush with the board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Jamier2 said:
Can you still use the seat with it installed like you have it? How much does it stick up from the board? I was thinking you could use a router and cut the mount surface down some so the speaker sits flush with the board.
the woofer is recessed into the particle board. It is actually two pieces of particle board with the woofer mounted to the bottom piece. I put a grill over the woofer and the top of the grill sits flush with the top. The seat is still fully useable. But when the seat is down and someone is sitting on it you lose all of the bass. But who really has regular passengers in their xcab? I can go into more detail about how it is done if anyone wants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Cool, I'll have to make one of those. I have a dog-deck back there that sits about an inch above the seat and could just remove the seat anyway. Any 8" sub has got to be better than the 6" el-cheapo bravo tube that I've got behind the seat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
ewarnerusa said:
I can go into more detail about how it is done if anyone wants.
I don't have passengers that often, but I like having that option, so your setup sounds nice. If you could give me some more info I'd appreciate it.

Did you build a small "box" around the sub so that it's enclosed or is it just hanging down into the storage space? If there's anything else I should know before building one just post it up.

Thanks,
Jamie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,124 Posts
i put my tools in there. 2 different impact socket sets, 1 standard socket set, 3 different types of box/open end wrenches, 3' 1/2" drive breaker bar, 1/2" drive ratchet, collapsable lug wrench, jumper cables, spare d batterys for my mag light, small first aid kit, bag of misc bolts and nuts, some other stuff i cant remember right now

and thats all on the passenger side!

divers side i have my crossovers for my component speakers and the control box for my trd locker wireing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Here's a write up from what I can remember.....

The setup is a free-air set up. I have heard of people making an actual fiberglass enclosure and I bet that sounds great. I've also heard of people trying to seal every nook nad cranny in the cubby to make this a sealed enclosure, but from the research I made it is very difficult and a bit futile. This setup is probably not maximizing the woofer, and it rattles at high volume. But if you're like me it gives all the bass you want. A picture is much more clear than words and I think I have some pics of this process at home somewhere. I'll look later when I'm home. This is just from memory, so here it goes....

1. Remove the cubby cover for use as a stencil. Unscrew the plastic screws on the plastic edge guard around the perimeter of the cubby opening. Take off the edge guard. Take everything out of the cubby and find a new place to store it. Take out the carpet from the bottom of the cubby (optional, I guess).

2. Use the cubby cover as a stencil and trace it onto a piece of particle board for the top sheet. I used a scrap piece of 3/4" particle board that I found in the garage. The board is just thick enough so it interferes a tiny bit with the fold down seat. The plastic hinge makes contact with it when folded all the way down so it won't stay flat against the floor. It still works fine, but if you wanted no interference you might try 1/2" particle board. Cut out your top sheet and sand the edges down.

3. Make another stencil trace on a piece of paper. I had to tape 2 pieces of 8.5x11 to get a long enough piece. Cut that template out, too, for later use. Place it over your top sheet and make sure that they match up.

4. The bottom sheet of the plate only needs to be big enough to surface-mount the woofer to. It also needs to be skinny enough to be able to sit down in the cubby opening, as well as provide enough wood to attach firmly to the topsheet. Cut the proper diameter hole into the bottom sheet to surface mount the woofer.

5. Cut the hole into the topsheet that is the outside diameter of the woofer so the woofer can be recessed below the topsheet.

6. Temporarily mount the woofer to the bottom sheet and fit your top and bottom sheet together. If all is well then glue/seal/screw the sheets together. Take out the woofer so you're left with just your new "stealth plate".

7. Take the paper template you made and place it over the truck cubby hole as if it was the original cover. Make sure it is tight and use tape so it stays in place. Now you'll want to poke holes through the paper that correspond to where the plastic screws once held the plastic edge guard on. I think there are 6 or 7. This template is so you can mark your new stealth plate with where to drill your mounting holes. Lay the template over the stealth plate and mark where to drill your holes. Drill holes of appropriate size for whatever screws and bolts you're using to secure the plate down. I used bolts with wing nuts. After drilling, make sure your plate lines up with the holes in the truck so you can securely mount it.

8. Sand/paint/carpet your stealth plate.

9. Assuming you're all wired up already, feed the speaker wire for the woofer into the inside of the cubby. My amp is under my passenger seat, so it was easy to feed the wire under the carpet, around the edge of the cubby and into the inside of the cubby. I then lined the inside cubby with 1" thick foam that was a dinner chair refinishing kit. I stuffed tried to cover all the metal, and I also stuffed it into the open space that leads into the driver's side of the cubby. I know it is not sealed, but that is the affect i was going for. I thought if dynomatting all the sheet metal in there, but I never did. I also filled a good portion of the inside volume of the cubby with polyfill.

10. Mount the steath plate to the cubby. The woofer should NOT be mounted yet so you can reach inside the cubby to secure the bolts for holding the plate on. This is quite awkward and difficult which is why I used wing nuts that are finger tight. I did try to really tighten them well, though. I should add that I put rubber weather stripping around the edge of the stealth plate to try to make a more airtight seal.

11. Wire up your woofer and mount it to the stealth plate.

12. Play loud music and annoy the neighbors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Thanks for the write-up. The paper stencil for the mount holes was a pretty good idea. I was planning to keep the hinge action, but now that I think about it it really doesn't make sense to do that unless you planned on fiddling with the system a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
I made one these very quickly this weekend, but instead of a paper stencil, I just pulled the plastic ring from around the hole to use as a template. This ensures you get the mounting holes drilled in just the right spot.
Have you looked into sealing the cubby at all? I just quickly made the mounting plate and installed a speaker, but thoughts of sealing up the cubby and possibly installing a port for a boomier sound have been running though my head every since I got it done. Free air speakers need to be bigger than 8". Any ideas on how to seal the cubby, or at least where the biggest holes to fill are? I was thinking of just stuffing the major gaps with foam batting and using plasting sheating to make it air tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Breathegood said:
I made one these very quickly this weekend, but instead of a paper stencil, I just pulled the plastic ring from around the hole to use as a template. This ensures you get the mounting holes drilled in just the right spot.
Have you looked into sealing the cubby at all? I just quickly made the mounting plate and installed a speaker, but thoughts of sealing up the cubby and possibly installing a port for a boomier sound have been running though my head every since I got it done. Free air speakers need to be bigger than 8". Any ideas on how to seal the cubby, or at least where the biggest holes to fill are? I was thinking of just stuffing the major gaps with foam batting and using plasting sheating to make it air tight.
Cool, how does it sound? I think there are too many air spaces to seal the compartment. The biggest I can think of is the air space between the passenger and driver's side cubby. I stuffed that chair padding I was talking about into the spaces between the driver and passenger cubby to "seal" that. Then I laid the foam down on all the exposed sheet metal I could get to. I think the stuffing with polyfill is key, too. But honestly I think it is futile to seal the cubby. Even if you do manage to get it sealed, then you have a sealed sheet-metal box which is not the best speaker enclosure material. I thought about dynamatting all the sheet metal, but it seemed too expensive and like too much effort. I'm not sure about your plastic sheating idea because I picture the sheating flapping and being noisy as the air moves from the woofer. And proper porting is much more than just cutting a hole in an enclosure. There are proper port lengths, positions, diameters, etc. that all need to be right for proper sound and not damaging the speaker. I have never tried it, but reading an instruction manual about building a ported enclosure makes it seem tough.... I think the ideal way to make this enclosure sealed is with fiberglass. When i was researching this I found some write ups and posts about people doing just that, but I can't remember where I found them. But in the end, it is only a 8" woofer...... No enclosure magic can make it shake the earth like a pair of 10's or 12's. At least no magic that I know of, i'm not an audio buff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
ewarnerusa said:
Breathegood-
I just noticed you live in Castle Rock. I lived in C Springs for acouple years. Castle Rock is just north of the Springs, isn't it?
Yup. My wife commutes to the Springs airport and my office is in south Denver, so Castle Rock is a reasonable split.

My idea with the plastic sheeting was to glue it all the way around....hmmm contact paper type of product maybe? Not a perfect seal, but it would take care of the major gaps without flapping around or shrinking/swelling like a diaphram. Then a layer of foam batting, or get all bling and use Dynamat. I know sheet metal doesn't make the best enclosure, but I think I could get better sound out of it than I do. I put a pair of 8" subs in the back gate of my old Pathfinder sealing up all the major holes in the gate and porting to the front and got really good sound from it. This replaces a cheapo 6" bass tube that I kept behind the driver's seat. I'll listen a little while before I compare the two, but my first impression is that it is not as thumpy as the tube. While I haven't taken the time to re-adjust my amp and crossover, I just don't feel it as much. Like I said before, 8" is just too small to make a good free-air sub. The sub that I bought is designed for .75-1 cubic foot sealed enclosures, which seems to be about right for the cubby if I can seal it up a little. I'd consider porting it if I could get the cubby pretty well sealed, just because it takes less power to drive a ported sub. Makes for some good, small scale weekend projects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
>>" But honestly I think it is futile to seal the cubby."<<

Couldn't you just use some spray foam, like Good Stuff, to seal it up??

Also, I've read somewhere (on the net) of guys taking liquid sound deadener and laying a few coats of the stuff on all the metal to create vibration-free enclosure. Then they filled the rest of the cavity with polyfill..

Here's a link to that liquid sound deadener >> http://www.edesignaudio.com/edeadv3_overview.htm .. Type in this coupon code for a 20% discount: CACOMGB

(Obtw, I am in NO way affiliated with that website..) ;)
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top