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hey

Would it be worth it to go on Spring break? Here is what I posted on ExPo, but apparently nobody has any good advice, so I'll post here too:

A friend and I are really considering spending spring break at BBNP. I've never been anywhere remotely close to there before (I live on the coast.) I read on the website that it gets busy during spring break, and reservations are probably a good idea. The problem is: you cannot reserve a backcountry campground. The only places you can reserve are the "civilized" campgrounds, of which there are 42. This is fine though, it would be nice to have water and restrooms at the end of the day, especially since it will be our first real "expedition." I really enjoyed the recent write-up on a Big Bend trip, and have gotten some ideas from that on where to go. However, I do have a couple of questions, namely:
1. Can you recommend a campsite in a good location?
2. What trails would you recommend for someone with limited time (perhaps only a couple of days) for both driving, as well as hiking?
3. What is the situation with fires/firewood? I'm wondering if I need to bring my own, or if it is available at park HQ's, etc.
 

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Would it be worth it to go on Spring break? Here is what I posted on ExPo, but apparently nobody has any good advice, so I'll post here too:

A friend and I are really considering spending spring break at BBNP. I've never been anywhere remotely close to there before (I live on the coast.) I read on the website that it gets busy during spring break, and reservations are probably a good idea. The problem is: you cannot reserve a backcountry campground. The only places you can reserve are the "civilized" campgrounds, of which there are 42. This is fine though, it would be nice to have water and restrooms at the end of the day, especially since it will be our first real "expedition." I really enjoyed the recent write-up on a Big Bend trip, and have gotten some ideas from that on where to go. However, I do have a couple of questions, namely:
1. Can you recommend a campsite in a good location?
2. What trails would you recommend for someone with limited time (perhaps only a couple of days) for both driving, as well as hiking?
3. What is the situation with fires/firewood? I'm wondering if I need to bring my own, or if it is available at park HQ's, etc.
The Old Ore road and the River road are the backroads you can drive. each one can easily take a day with sightseeing stops. Ground fires were prohibited the last time I went there. Check their site for details. If you get there very early on Saturday, you should be able to get a prmitive campground, or if you want to camp in the Basin, which is my favorite, You can drive up there and see if someone is breaking camp and courteously ask if you can leave a chair or something to claim the campsite, I don't know if there are reservations for the basin campgrounds, if so, this suggestion may not work if the campsite is reserved.

It is very crowded during Spring break, but the back country roads aren't too bad and they do have several primitive campsites located along the roads.

There are several trails in the Chisos Basin area which take from 15 minutes to overnight. All of them are worthwhile doing.

Bruce
 

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As for 4-wheelin' it is not that great...I would say sight seeing is the best. I did almost all of the roads in a 2000 2wd Nissan frontier and had absolutely no problems (I had BFG all terrains). Campfires are prohibited in back country camping, but in the basin it just depends on if there is a fire ban in effect at that time (I usually use a camp stove instead of open coals to cook anyway). Spring break with have a few people, not too many as long as you plan ahead (get a reservation). Personally, I would rather camp backcountry in the park (most people that go have an RV and don't hit the backcountry roads). For backcountry it depends on if you like car camping or backpacking. Car camping I would hit the backcountry roads (black gap road, river road, etc.) but for actual backpacking I would park in the basin and hit a good trail. One of my favorites is Emory Peak trail (leads to the south rim...or you can just take the south rim trail...get ready because the hike is rough for some people). I think it is about a 3 hour hike to the south rim (one of the best views in the area and one of the most photographed...actually, most pictures taken of the basin are of the south rim). If you have any more ideas or concerns let me know...I will be around for spring break if you want a free guide.
 

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