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Putting on longer rear line, any pictures of rear brake bleeder? Never done it. I'm a newbie, but not neutered yet!

Pictures and instructions please!
 

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Welcome to the world of automotive repair, do yourself a favor and get a Haynes/Chilton's repair manual or Toyota Factory Service Manual.

Bleeding brakes is something that should be done every two years or so to remove contaminated brake fluid. DOT 3 or DOT 4 brake fluid (the kind that's probably in your car's system) is hygroscopic, that is, it absorbs water. The brake lines, master and slave cylinders and fittings on your brake system are made of steel. These will rust in time if exposed to water, setting the stage for catastrophic brake failure. Water will also boil if the brake cylinder gets hot enough, causing brake loss just when you most need the brakes.

Brake fluid should be replaced by bleeding at least once every two years. The process of bleeding your brakes is rather straight forward, and can be done by the average home mechanic with a few tools and one assistant. The job involves opening fittings on the calipers or drums called bleeder screws and pumping the bubbles out of the lines. You do this by pushing on the brake pedal and using it as a pump.

Top off the master cylinder reservoir with new fluid. Caution: Brake fluid is an excellent paint stripper. It will destroy your paint job so don't spill any. If you do, wipe it up immediately.

Toward the top of each caliper or wheel cylinder of the drum, you will find its bleeder screw. Begin with the bleeder which is farthest from the master cylinder: typically, the left rear. Fit a rubber vacuum hose onto it and put the other end of the hose into a drain pan to hold the old fluid. It is important that the hose be fully immersed in fluid: put some fresh fluid in your pan to start. Put a wrench on the bleeder and open it about a half turn. The screws are probably rusted, so go easy and use some penetrating oil. Be prepared for a little brake fluid to seep onto your face. Have an assistant push the brake pedal smoothly all the way to the floor and hold it there. This will force the air out through the hollow bleeder screw and through your hose into the drain pan. Close the bleeder. It is important that the assistant understands not to release the pedal until you have tightened the bleeder screw. Now, with the bleeder screw closed, have your assistant release the pedal. Repeat this opening bleeder - pumping pedal - closing bleeder until there is no mroe air bubbles. (If the pedal is released, the system will suck air into the line through the open bleeder screw.
Keeping the end of the hose immersed in fluid will reduce the chance of air bleeding back into the system. Brakes don't work with air in the lines.
Throughout the job, keep the master cylinder reservoir topped up. If it empties, air can be introduced to the system here as well. Your brake pedal should be firm and strong with no sponginess.

This is what a bleeder screw looks like (it is best to use either an 8 or 10mm flare nut wrench as open end wrenches tend to easily round the head):
 

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Excellent write up!

There is only one point I would take issue with though,
jimbo74 said:
...push the brake pedal smoothly all the way to the floor...
Very rarely, that water that may accumulate can cause corrosion in the master cylinder. This can be in bore deeper than the usual stroke of the pedal. If it does happen, pumping the pedal all the way to the floor will drag the seals over the corroded spot and nick them. Then you will have a fluid leak from the master cylinder. Sometimes, fluid leaking from the master cylinder will track its way into the most obscure of places, and there can be no noticeable evidence of it happening.

When pumping the pedal, be careful not to push it further than it normally travels. The result is it will take many many more pumps to do the job. Another potential result is the avoidance of sudden and complete brake failure a couple of days later, without warning.

All this may sound very unlikely, but it HAS happened to me. Not "a friend of mine", or "I heard about someone"; but real experience. Not something I would like to do again, and recommend others don't either.
 
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