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See this post for answers......here:D
 

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There is really is no such thing a cheap power. Just more expensive power.

Oddly enough the more you spend, the more bang you get for your buck.

The little things will nickle and dime you to death without much true gain other than what you imagine.

Edit
Oh yeah, check out newbie tech next time before you get your tail feathers singed.
 

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Damn Dick you getting soft in your old age:D

But yeah for just 300 you are SOL about the only thing you can do but it will not gain you much hp or mileage is go to a muffler shop and get you a flowmaster or magnaflow installed and that about it for that kind of dough, but it still will not get you much.

Search around on here just about ever hp or fuel saving mod has been done on here.

And like ainokea said add another 0 to that 300 and you might get somewhere but if you can't don't bother with any of it. I wish I hadn't
 

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IMO $300 in HP upgrades will cost you an extra $300 in gas. There is no magic HP bullet to be found here.
 

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I must be stupid because I don't get it.
hahahahhaha i wish i could sell the 1000 pokemon cards i have from when i was younger
 

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Hp

:saw: Buy a cheap Sawzall.....Cut off yer muffler,right in front of the Muffler inlet.
If that aint enough...keep cuttin' things off till you go faster
 

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:saw: Buy a cheap Sawzall.....Cut off yer muffler,right in front of the Muffler inlet.
If that aint enough...keep cuttin' things off till you go faster
shit, if he's gonna waste 300 bucks anyway might as well buy a kickass sawzall or a whole cordless set for that much and get some use out of the money.

gas is probably the best hp/dollar ratio mod, as if you spend no money on gas you have no power :D
 

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:saw: Buy a cheap Sawzall.....Cut off yer muffler,right in front of the Muffler inlet.
If that aint enough...keep cuttin' things off till you go faster
power to weight is the best way to go for cheap, easier on your truck when you jump it too:xrocker: you might also try an electric fan, flex-a-lite claims up to 17 ponies but I have not seen any dyno results myself
 

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Yes, reducing weight results in the most econimical and lasting gains in speed over increasing power.

But, here we go with the electric fan myth again.

Here's a couple of questions Mr. Hot Shot. Where does the power to drive the fan motor come from? Where does the power to drive the alternator come from? Neglecting the other losses involved, have you ever heard of this nastey little thing in physics called conversion loss? Neglecting the warm wires for the moment, where does the heat in the operating electric fan motor and alternator come from?

BTW Dean and I just measured the case temp on a couple of alternators and found it to be significant but normal according to the FSM. Even at the somewhat low ouput demand of about 30 amps.

How do you figure that an electric fan and it's DC motor are lighter than the stock fan and a simple bimetal thermostat?

Like electric cars and hybrids, electric fans are only good till the battery runs down then you're opertating at a net comparitive loss. And just like those, if it sounds to good to be true, you can usually get away with betting your last dollar it really isn't true.

It ain't hard folks. It's just simple high school physics and a little common sense. All you have to do is use it.
 

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Here's a couple of questions Mr. Hot Shot. Where does the power to drive the fan motor come from? Where does the power to drive the alternator come from? Neglecting the other losses involved, have you ever heard of this nastey little thing in physics called conversion loss? Neglecting the warm wires for the moment, where does the heat in the operating electric fan motor and alternator come from?

BTW Dean and I just measured the case temp on a couple of alternators and found it to be significant but normal according to the FSM. Even at the somewhat low ouput demand of about 30 amps.

How do you figure that an electric fan and it's DC motor are lighter than the stock fan and a simple bimetal thermostat?

Like electric cars and hybrids, electric fans are only good till the battery runs down then you're opertating at a net comparitive loss. And just like those, if it sounds to good to be true, you can usually get away with betting your last dollar it really isn't true.

It ain't hard folks. It's just simple high school physics and a little common sense. All you have to do is use it.
true.

but consider this when you mash on the skinny, an electric fan doesn't create drag directly on the crank. so you will FEEL more horse power although in the long run it may cost more to run because of like you said... parasidic losses in conversion power. being the motor > alternator > battery > fan. vs. motor > fan.

also, the fan will only work when it NEEDS to e.g. when you are running the ac or sitting /moving slow; therefor when traveling at highway speeds it may, (and usually does) kick off, thus conserving power. a traditional fan does not have that option.

that being said... why spend 300$ when you can have 50hp for FREE :

 

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FYI the stock mechanical fan only works when it needs to as well. That's what the thermostatically controlled clutch is for.

Whether the fan itself imposes a drag on the crank shaft or the drag is induced indirectly by the alternator is somewhat immaterial as drag is drag. If anything, physics dictates that if you are going to move an equivalent and equal amount of air in a given amount of time, the electric fan will take more parasitic power to do the same amount of work.

The only time an electric fan is really helpful concerning the power needed to drive them is in a quarter mile type of contest and you use a battery and stored energy to drive the electric fan.

Sometimes electric fans are helpful if placement of a mechanical fan with the engine and radiator location is a problem as it is in my FJ.

Then to there is the ability to shut them off for deep water crossings.
However, that can be over come with a mechanical fan if you are patient and ease yourself into the water so the water you're crossing cools off the oil pan then the radiator and everything else so the fan clutch isn't engaged during the crossing.

Some of today's cars use them because they can run after the engine is shut off to cool things down under the hood in order to preclude material damage and part failure due to high temps. That's because engine operating temps are higher these days and the space under the hood is so much more cramped than it was in times past. Especially in front wheel drive vehicles where the entire drive train is crammed under the hood.

Otherwise an electric fan is an all around loosing proposition from an efficiency standpoint.

I've read posts on here from several folks who installed them, then later on went back to the stock mechanical fan setup. Some of whom I tried to reason with not to but they would not listen. The siren song of something for cheap was just to alluring. LOL
 

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FYI the stock mechanical fan only works when it needs to as well. That's what the thermostatically controlled clutch is for.

Whether the fan itself imposes a drag on the crank shaft or the drag is induced indirectly by the alternator is somewhat immaterial as drag is drag. If anything, physics dictates that if you are going to move an equivalent and equal amount of air in a given amount of time, the electric fan will take more parasitic power to do the same amount of work.

The only time an electric fan is really helpful concerning the power needed to drive them is in a quarter mile type of contest and you use a battery and stored energy to drive the electric fan.

Sometimes electric fans are helpful if placement of a mechanical fan with the engine and radiator location is a problem as it is in my FJ.

Then to there is the ability to shut them off for deep water crossings.
However, that can be over come with a mechanical fan if you are patient and ease yourself into the water so the water you're crossing cools off the oil pan then the radiator and everything else so the fan clutch isn't engaged during the crossing.

Some of today's cars use them because they can run after the engine is shut off to cool things down under the hood in order to preclude material damage and part failure due to high temps. That's because engine operating temps are higher these days and the space under the hood is so much more cramped than it was in times past. Especially in front wheel drive vehicles where the entire drive train is crammed under the hood.

Otherwise an electric fan is an all around loosing proposition from an efficiency standpoint.

I've read posts on here from several folks who installed them, then later on went back to the stock mechanical fan setup. Some of whom I tried to reason with not to but they would not listen. The siren song of something for cheap was just to alluring. LOL
half doz of one 6 of the other.

the point is electric fans will consume more energy in the long run.

but when you hit the skinny to pass that douch bag with 16" of lift on a preruner... electric fans free up hp temporarily.

also, i didnt know they clutch was temp controlled. thats deffinaly new to me. thanks for the info.
 

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Damn it, not if the fan happens to be running at the time. It's gonna be sucking about 20 amps or so out of the alternator and about another 5 amps or so is gonna be pissed away making heat in the alternator. The high speed Ford Taurus fan winding sucks a whopping 30 amps, measured.

Now if you put a vacuum cut off switch in the control relay circuit it would kick it off when you mash the throttle for passing and you'd have what you want. I can help you figure out that wiring easily enough if you need it. Just add the vac switch in series with the relay coil and use the NC contacts on the vac switch. When your manifold vac drops as you open the trottle, the switch opens and the electric motor drops off line eliminating the extra load on the alternator.
 
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