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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just got a new to me Tacoma last night. Its my first Toyota. yee haw.
I find the clutch to be very sticky, and the release point is very near the end. The truck has high kms.
Is there any adjustment?
Bleed the slave/clutch master cylinders?

Maybe I'll have to do the inevitable....

As well I have performed this service tonight:
new 75w90 tranny oil
new oil and filter
spark plugs
put in some fuel additive
complete undercoating including under the box liner
greased every nipple in the drivetrain

Anything else off hand I should do?
Fuel filter?


Thanks for the help.

Andrew
 

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My clutch release point is near the end too. I just replaced the clutch in July. To my knowledge, you can't adjust the clutch. Does the clutch slip at all when you switch gears? Mine started doing that right before I changed it.
 

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aburchell44 said:
I find the clutch to be very sticky, and the release point is very near the end. The truck has high kms.
Is there any adjustment?
Bleed the slave/clutch master cylinders?
Perfectly normal. I've seen many Tacoma clutches release very near the top, even when brand new. There is no way to adjust this and it has no negative effect on the clutch.

Best way to check to see if the clutch is holding good is to shift from 2nd to 5th and floor it. If the RPMs shoot up, then your clutch is slipping. If not, its still in good condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I kinda did a load test the other day and it did not slip. I just found that when compared to my TDI Jetta, the release point is very different.
The VW is approximately 1-1.5" long and the truck seems to be a half an inch if you know what I mean. As well my old mans V6 Nissan truck is about an inch between intial threshold and full engagement.

Thanks
Andrew
 

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Man it has been a while since I have been on here. I had to reregister...

I too have a 98 4x4 with the 2.7 with 103,000 miles. Oh, origonal clutch. When I bought it, it had 16,000 miles and there was a lot of play in the clutch. So I am guessing that the clutch is at the end of its life. Mine releases about an inch from the top now. I know it needs a new clutch but it is not slipping yet. The truck is now just a weekend warrior so I am not too concerned about it until it starts to slip. I plan on replacing it myself when it does go out.

Andy
 

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I don't know if Tacomas are the same, but on my old '87 honda accord, I could adjust the clutch under the hood. Find the clutch cable which runs through the firewall and into the engine compartment, and where it goes into the bellhousing, the cable should be attached to an arm of some sort, this is where the cable is threaded and has a nut you can tighten or loosen to adjust where the clutch engages and disengages.

Like I said don't know if tacomas are the same, but i would imagine they are, not around my truck to go and look. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Also, most clutches release more towards the top (typically about an 1" from the top).

Luke
 

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ShowStop said:
Best way to check to see if the clutch is holding good is to shift from 2nd to 5th and floor it. If the RPMs shoot up, then your clutch is slipping. If not, its still in good condition.

Showstop, never heard of this, how does that work if you know? Learn something new everyday.
 

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swanky868 said:
I don't know if Tacomas are the same, but on my old '87 honda accord, I could adjust the clutch under the hood. Find the clutch cable which runs through the firewall and into the engine compartment, and where it goes into the bellhousing, the cable should be attached to an arm of some sort, this is where the cable is threaded and has a nut you can tighten or loosen to adjust where the clutch engages and disengages.

Like I said don't know if tacomas are the same, but i would imagine they are, not around my truck to go and look. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Also, most clutches release more towards the top (typically about an 1" from the top).

Luke
Not the same


Mine releases near the top too. Your fine unless it's slipping.
 

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swanky868 said:
I don't know if Tacomas are the same, but on my old '87 honda accord, I could adjust the clutch under the hood. Find the clutch cable which runs through the firewall and into the engine compartment, and where it goes into the bellhousing, the cable should be attached to an arm of some sort, this is where the cable is threaded and has a nut you can tighten or loosen to adjust where the clutch engages and disengages.

Like I said don't know if tacomas are the same, but i would imagine they are, not around my truck to go and look. Correct me if I'm wrong.
Sorry, the Tacoma clutches are very different. They are not cable linkage type like the Honda. Our trucks have a hydraulic clutch with a master and slave cylinder. It functions just like brakes. Because of this design, there is no adjustment of the engagement point.
 

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swanky868 said:
Showstop, never heard of this, how does that work if you know? Learn something new everyday.
Its an old mechanics trick. You rev out 2nd gear then shift to 5th and floor it. The big gear change makes the engine work hard to turn the gears. If the clutch is weak, then that will slip and the rpms will shoot up.
 

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Thanks for the clarification on the clutch and "mechanics trick." I'll have to remember that one.
 

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I have a 1999 Tacoma 4x4 with the 2.7L 3RZ. You can adjust where you want the engagement through the stroke of the clutch pedal. Get under your dash where the clutch pedal is. There is a clipped pin connecting the rod to the master cylinder with the clutch pedal. Remove the clip for the pin, remove the pin, then adjust the bracket that connects the clutch pedal to the rod/master cylinder. I believe the bracket has a locknut as well. Just rotate the bracket relative to the threaded rod going into the master cylinder to adjust the engagement. To make a long story short my dad had my truck for a while and didn't like the engagement point and made it to where it engaged almost right off the floor. I had to change it back the way it was which was with the clutch engaging closer towards the fully released position.
 

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sometimes a slipping clutch is not completely shot. There is a possible remedy.

I've never tried this on a tacoma but it has worked on some of our fleet Fords;

Once the clutch has been rode or slipped to much by an incompetent driver it becomes a bit slick or "glazed". After hearing about the clutch problem I take the truck out and perform SHOWSTOPS little 2nd to fith (or 4th) trick. Once the engine revs and the truck doesn't move i just keep on a revin' untill the cloud of clutch smoke gets a little embarassing or to thick to see out of. The purpose is to burn of the glaze on the surface of the clutch. After that i let the clutch cool down. Most of the time its magic and the clutch works fine once again. If there is no clutch left however this trick is pointless. What have you got to lose though? it sure beats doing an early clutch replacement.
 

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ShowStop said:
Uhhh, thats not the way to adjust it. That is however a great way to kill the throwout bearing.
Why do you say that? If you adjusted it to where the clutch disengaged when you barely press the clutch pedal that would be closer to putting pressure on the throwout bearing causing premature failure. His clutch is already engaging like that. Why would the rod to the master cylinder be threaded so far as well? I'm sure it is for making small adjustments like this.

If anyone has a Helm's service manual maybe they could shed some light on adjusting the clutch.
 

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007 said:
sometimes a slipping clutch is not completely shot. There is a possible remedy.

I've never tried this on a tacoma but it has worked on some of our fleet Fords;

Once the clutch has been rode or slipped to much by an incompetent driver it becomes a bit slick or "glazed". After hearing about the clutch problem I take the truck out and perform SHOWSTOPS little 2nd to fith (or 4th) trick. Once the engine revs and the truck doesn't move i just keep on a revin' untill the cloud of clutch smoke gets a little embarassing or to thick to see out of. The purpose is to burn of the glaze on the surface of the clutch. After that i let the clutch cool down. Most of the time its magic and the clutch works fine once again. If there is no clutch left however this trick is pointless. What have you got to lose though? it sure beats doing an early clutch replacement.
Wouldn't that just cause it to glaze worse?
 

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Intrepid said:
Wouldn't that just cause it to glaze worse?
You would think, but I guess not because the clutch works better afterwords. It must burn the glaze off and expose a fresh layer of material. Sort of like a pencil eraser thats been all slicked up and needs a good scrubbing. Of course if the clutch is slipping because its gone then it would just be metal to metal on the flywheel and the smoke show would not occur.
 

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brogers said:
Why do you say that? If you adjusted it to where the clutch disengaged when you barely press the clutch pedal that would be closer to putting pressure on the throwout bearing causing premature failure. His clutch is already engaging like that. Why would the rod to the master cylinder be threaded so far as well? I'm sure it is for making small adjustments like this.

If anyone has a Helm's service manual maybe they could shed some light on adjusting the clutch.
I'll say it in plain english. There is no adjustment for the clutch engagement point. The push rod adjustment is only for the pedal free play. Standard pedal free play is about 0.25".

If you have no free play, then the pedal is out of adjustment and putting extra pressure on the throwout bearing which will cause it to prematurely fail.

If you read the FSM, it talks about the clutch engagement point. It never mentions adjustment because there is none. Unless there is a problem with the master or slave cylinder, the only other way the engagement point changes is due to the clutch pressure plate and disk. Read up on the FSM for yourself.

http://www.deserted1.com/FSM/Repair_Manual/03tacoma/cl/cluped/insp.pdf

I've worked on dozens of Toyota trucks and know the clutch operation very well. I've serviced the clutch master and slave cylinders on several trucks and replaced dozens of clutches over the years. You can keep questioning my information, but trust me, I know what I'm talking about. Ask anybody here. Search for the word clutch and I bet you'll find my name pop up all over the place.
 
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