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What would be the best choice of coil overs to run in the Eastern US that gets a lot of salt exposure? I remember a few years ago people were having a lot of problems and some companies were offering better rust/corrosion resistance.
 

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Donahoes with their extreme weather coating......mine have been thru on Michigan winter and are unaffected som far
 

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i am wondering about this as well. i live in wyo and in the winters it sometimes looks like a spilled salt shaker on the roads.
 

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Regardless of coilover choice what is the best way to protect them during the winter? Do the coil boots do well or should they be ok as long as you keep them clean?
 

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I have yet to see rusted coilover pics. Anyone.......
 

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Car wax does a good job of winterizing CO's. Put it on and don't buff it off. Use spray wax on the threads.
 

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best solution i have heard is remount your old assemblys when you see the salters hit the road.... or when the leaves fall

i think i will be doing that when i order my hoes
 

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yeah i started one of the threads on this subject.

coilovers and salty winters or something like that.

theres a pic of some messed up hoes? i think. thats why i went w ome 882's.
 

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I would suggest that when you finally get your coilovers....remove the spring from the coilover....cover the shock shaft and spray the shock body and coils with a coat of clear laquer....just don't get it on the shaft so you don't risk messing up the seals....that what i would do. I'm willing to bet that this is the same thing Donohoe Racing does when they apply there " extreme weather " coating.
 

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That is a good idea, do you think that would mess up the threads at all?
if anything it may make it a little bit harder to turn the first time you adjust them but it should not be too hard with a spanner wrench...or before you re-assemble them run the adjuster ring threw the threads all the way and i think that problem would be solved if there even is a issue with that....just don't go crazy with the lacquer and do a heavy spray job. you could also cover the threads with blue Painters tape but the salt would probably rust the threads if they are not protected and that would make it hard to adjust also.

As a side note: I have the Dirt Bagz coilover covers and i only use them in the rain...if ever..but i live in Southern California and i doesn't even do that very often. They only cover the spring so the rest of the coilover would be exposed the the elements. I personaly wouldn't buy them....they came with my Camburg 2.5's
 

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The key to keeping coilovers happy is keeping them clean. After wheeling or after a few weeks of driving wash them off to get the dirt/muck/salt/animalparts off of them. Twice a year take the time to really clean out the threads and lubricate everything. Thats helped keep the ground control coilovers on my civic happy for the last 4 years anyways, and while not seeing nearly as much mud it sees its fair share of salt and misc road grime since the car is pretty low.
 

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ok if you bothered to look up that thread i was refering to........

a, youd know that the shock shafts rust no matter what brand (hoes seem to do best). pitted shaft = leaky seals = my main reason for not gettin em.
b, you could delay the corrosion on the bodies collars etc by coating them but every time u adjust the collar youll have to recoat that spot (dr co's seem to have that covered w a nickel nitride somethin talkin outta my ass coating)
c, youll learn that some people know absolutely nothing about harsh winter conditions and offer opinions that are not feasable. (you would not believe the # of times it was suggested that I should wash the co's after every salty day. ummmm up here most any day is a salty day in the winter and im sure as hell not gonna be caught dead under the truck in -40 weather, every day, all winter long. yeah great suggestion.) i suggested that someone should do a comparison of all the major brands. a couple hundred freeze thaw cycles in salt water but there have been no takers.

if u really want co's gett em for the summer and set up your old top plates w some ome 882's and shocks for winter.
 

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ok if you bothered to look up that thread i was refering to........

a, youd know that the shock shafts rust no matter what brand (hoes seem to do best). pitted shaft = leaky seals = my main reason for not gettin em.
b, you could delay the corrosion on the bodies collars etc by coating them but every time u adjust the collar youll have to recoat that spot (dr co's seem to have that covered w a nickel nitride somethin talkin outta my ass coating)
c, youll learn that some people know absolutely nothing about harsh winter conditions and offer opinions that are not feasable. (you would not believe the # of times it was suggested that I should wash the co's after every salty day. ummmm up here most any day is a salty day in the winter and im sure as hell not gonna be caught dead under the truck in -40 weather, every day, all winter long. yeah great suggestion.) i suggested that someone should do a comparison of all the major brands. a couple hundred freeze thaw cycles in salt water but there have been no takers.

if u really want co's gett em for the summer and set up your old top plates w some ome 882's and shocks for winter.
Maybe you should try including a link to the thread you are talking about....just a thought
 

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I've lived with this car in northern michigan, and the mid-atlantic and NE salts for RAIN STORMS, let alone ice and snow. I take my car to a DIY carwash weekly and use the pressure washer to blast the hell out of the undercarriage and suspension. I'd imagine it would be a lot easier on a lifted pickup than on a lowered civic. And yes, the DIY places stay open, at least they did in Traverse City when I worked/lived there, because most of the hoses/water are heated.
 

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yeah

The shock bodies of my SAW's are starting to pit/rust, and they aren't even a year old. I live a few hundred yards away from saltwater, which means anytime there is a south/east breeze (3/4 of the time), I have salty air hitting my truck. Plus I go to the beach on average 2-3 times a week. My truck hates me, and I hate it that it is starting to rust this bad. I think when they get kinda bad, I'll take them off and coat them in something, not sure what though. The wax idea sounds good, may just put a bunch on and not buff it off.
-Dan
 

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DR uses some type of MIL SPEC coating for the corrosion resistance. I spent the first 1/2 of my life in the harsh winter and salt roads and we used car wax on the shocks, alumininum wheels and anything chromed. I may live in SoCal now, but I came from hell...:rolleyes:
 

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Those are ugly. I think that that could have been prevented to some extent depending on some cleaning. I am in the northeast so know it is hard but maybe on occasion they need a little tlc.
 
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