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Hey yall. My account is new but i've been reading ttora forums off and on for a couple of years. Here's what i have to work with: 2002 double cab 2WD, 3.4 V6, TRD package, 265/70/16 BFG at. I've read almost all of the threads on coilovers, spacers, body lifts, SAS, etc. From those I found opposite oppinions on the same product so many times I have no idea what to think about any of them. In a day I drive 10 miles to school, 10 miles to work, 10 miles home. I hardly ever offroad and when i do it is very light and slow. My truck rides stiff as a board offroad and on the street. Spacers, SAS, and drop bracket lifts are out of the question. According to many posts, the coilovers are the best for my truck in that they do not cause premature wear on most parts and can actually improve the ride. Which coilover setup will give me the best ride and be the most durable for my truck? I'm assuming the Donahoes would be the best and if they are I will wait for the new ones with the rust proof plating since i do drive on the beach occasionally. Thanks for reading this long post :)
-Matt
 

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I believe just about everyone would agree the donahoes are hard to beat. I have the std. length ones with just stock upper arms and freaking love them. Took awhile to save up, but I have no regrets. The rust proof ones would be nice to have. I'm in northen VA and they've salted the crap out of these roads. I sprayed them good with wd-40 before the first snow fall and so far the hoes look great. You may also want to look into upgrading your rear to match the coilovers. The deaver/alcan leafs with some bils out back make for a killer ride.
 

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If you're not wheelin offroad why would you drop $1k on a set of DR coilovers?

Save your $$$. Get a set of non-TRD tacoma springs (you can have mine for free, they are a tad softer than the TRD springs) and a new set of Bilstein or Doetsch Tech shocks.

For the rear, i was looking at the Deaver packs, but since i dont wheel offroad enough to warrant that cost i will try this mod (kindly posted by another member in another thread, http://www.mor4wd.com/mods.asp?ID=12).

From what you described by what you're after you don't need to fork out so much $$$ (but you can if you want to).

If you want some lift, a small 1" spacer up front or a set of OME 881 springs would work ok.

now, the more experienced off-roaders will chime in..... :)



TWIN said:
Hey yall. My account is new but i've been reading ttora forums off and on for a couple of years. Here's what i have to work with: 2002 double cab 2WD, 3.4 V6, TRD package, 265/70/16 BFG at. I've read almost all of the threads on coilovers, spacers, body lifts, SAS, etc. From those I found opposite oppinions on the same product so many times I have no idea what to think about any of them. In a day I drive 10 miles to school, 10 miles to work, 10 miles home. I hardly ever offroad and when i do it is very light and slow. My truck rides stiff as a board offroad and on the street. Spacers, SAS, and drop bracket lifts are out of the question. According to many posts, the coilovers are the best for my truck in that they do not cause premature wear on most parts and can actually improve the ride. Which coilover setup will give me the best ride and be the most durable for my truck? I'm assuming the Donahoes would be the best and if they are I will wait for the new ones with the rust proof plating since i do drive on the beach occasionally. Thanks for reading this long post :)
-Matt
 

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If you think your truck rides stiff as a board now, just about every aftermarket suspension product you can add, including coilovers will make it stiffer. All of the coilovers on the market have a higher spring rate than stock and spacer puts added pre-load on the springs. Now that doesn't mean the ride won't be better but it will be stiffer. As for what's best for a street queen....Fabtech, Sway-A-Way, or All-Pro coilovers would suite your needs every bit as well as a $1000 pair of Donahoe's. It's going to be the rear end that you don't want to skimp on. Ideally, you'ld want a full Deaver leafpack, their progressive AAL pack would ride really well too, just make sure you pair it up with a quality pair of shocks. Bilstiens are a favorite around here.
 

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Deaver is not the only one for rear leaf packs like the "Deaver". Alcan is another good choice (although very pricey but less than Deaver). After careful consideration on the Deaver i felt it was "too much" of a leaf pack for my needs (i thought i wanted it, but then decided i did not need to spend that much $$$).

on the fronts - i suggested non-TRD oem springs with some good shocks (or a longer aftermarket spring with slightly less spring rate) and maybe add a 1" spacer. since i would be willing to send "TWIN" my non-TRD springs for merely shipping costs, he could get a set of 1-2" spacers for cheap. well worth the savings from not buying the DR coilovers.



Breathegood said:
If you think your truck rides stiff as a board now, just about every aftermarket suspension product you can add, including coilovers will make it stiffer. All of the coilovers on the market have a higher spring rate than stock and spacer puts added pre-load on the springs. Now that doesn't mean the ride won't be better but it will be stiffer. As for what's best for a street queen....Fabtech, Sway-A-Way, or All-Pro coilovers would suite your needs every bit as well as a $1000 pair of Donahoe's. It's going to be the rear end that you don't want to skimp on. Ideally, you'ld want a full Deaver leafpack, their progressive AAL pack would ride really well too, just make sure you pair it up with a quality pair of shocks. Bilstiens are a favorite around here.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
First of all, thanks for the fast responses. I was under the impression that hoes make the ride a little more plush and really soak up the bumps. I never thought of putting a pair of non TRD springs up there but i'll look into it. I'm in Dallas, Tx. If you guys are near i'll come pick them up from you or if it's not much trouble I'd like to ride with someone that has coilovers. As for the rear end, it seems that the deavers are the way to go. I used to have bad axle wrap when stoping and spinning with the locker on knocked the truck out of gear a couple of times. After towing my trailer to Houston a few times that stopped. Go figure. Well I also got a 30k mile service so maybe they lubed something. Anyways, I would be willing to spend the money on hoes merely for the belief that they would not give me problems with the truck. It is a street queen and my only vehicle so I don't want to tear it up offroad but some lift, a size bigger tire, and a non jarring ride would be awesome. Oh and I wouldn't be doing this until the tires wear out anyways so there's plenty of time. I'll check back after work.
-Matt
 

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Breathegood said:
If you think your truck rides stiff as a board now, just about every aftermarket suspension product you can add, including coilovers will make it stiffer. All of the coilovers on the market have a higher spring rate than stock and spacer puts added pre-load on the springs. Now that doesn't mean the ride won't be better but it will be stiffer. As for what's best for a street queen....Fabtech, Sway-A-Way, or All-Pro coilovers would suite your needs every bit as well as a $1000 pair of Donahoe's. It's going to be the rear end that you don't want to skimp on. Ideally, you'ld want a full Deaver leafpack, their progressive AAL pack would ride really well too, just make sure you pair it up with a quality pair of shocks. Bilstiens are a favorite around here.
When it comes to comfort or better ride quality it appears as though there are many different opinions, but to say aftermarket coilovers will be stiffer,... I would tend to disagree. Of course the higher you crank them the stiffer the ride, but even with 2" of lift on my hoes it was softer than the TRD POS's. Sure they are pricy, but in my opinion they are well worth it. I would hate to give him contradicting advice, so I was just wondering if you have been on a truck with donahoe coilovers before? I have only driven Taco's with TRD coils, Non TRD coils, and Donahoes. I have never been on any other type of coilover so I am just going by what I know. Sure the non TRD's were a little softer, but the hoes made a drastic difference,... a very big difference in ride quality in the sense that they were softer. Just my experience with the above mentioned coilovers.
 

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'the higher you crank them the stiffer the ride'

I am no suspension wiz but I was wondering if that is actually true. In the back of my mind I thought cranking the spring down only makes the initial movement change not the progression. I could be way off, but I thought I would ask.
 

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I don’t understand your question... By cranking up, I meant height of the truck going up,… not the coilover collar. When you make the truck go up it is like preloading the coils and thus compressing them. In doing so they become stiffer and stiffer until they are fully compressed and the coils end up binding together. I am not a suspension wiz either but this is the way I understand it and hopefully someone else can explain it better.
 

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mel22b said:
'the higher you crank them the stiffer the ride'

I am no suspension wiz but I was wondering if that is actually true. In the back of my mind I thought cranking the spring down only makes the initial movement change not the progression. I could be way off, but I thought I would ask.
pre-load decreases the amount of spring travel, not articulation travel. so it's possible to compress the spring (preload) too much and then bind it way before the a-arms reach full swing.

more preload will feel like a stiffer spring, that's why some like to find a long spring at a lower spring rate (but the coilover shock must be able to accept a longer spring, with bilsteins it's possible to regroove their snapring groove lower down on the shock body allowing for a longer spring to be used.)
 

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I guess we define "stiffer" differently. My SAWs have a 675# coil. This is over 30% "stiffer" than the stock TRD coil and the truck rides as such, but they soak up the bumps way better than the TRD coils ever did. I'm not sure but I think the DR's use a 600 or 650# coil, almost as stiff, but due to their valving and construction they "feel" a lot more plush. Push down on the bumper of a stock Taco, and then your DR equiped Taco and see what you think is "stiffer". Anyway, my point was that the DR coilovers are overkill for a truck that doesn't wheel that often or at all. Putting a quality leafpack and shocks on the rear will make a more noticable ride improvement for a street queen than DR's vs. SAWs, Fabs, or other less expensive shock choice on the front.
 

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Thanks for more info. What are the rates on the TRD Coils on the Double Cabs?
 

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I think the stock non-TRD coils are 500# coils. I'm not sure how one would rate the TRD coil since it is a progressive spring. It probably starts at or near 500# and the spring rate increases as it is compressed. This is why it is generally not recomended to use coil spacers with TRD coils. By adding a spacer you are eliminating the initial lower spring rate of the coil thus making the ride more jarring.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sorry I haven't been on in a while. I'm still confused. Are you guys saying that coilovers will make the ride less jarring? That's what I'm primarily concerned about.. a plush ride on and off road. If anyone lives in the DFW or West Monroe, LA I would love to ride in a truck with a coilover lift. Thanks for all the info yall.
-Matt
 

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TWIN said:
Sorry I haven't been on in a while. I'm still confused. Are you guys saying that coilovers will make the ride less jarring? That's what I'm primarily concerned about.. a plush ride on and off road. If anyone lives in the DFW or West Monroe, LA I would love to ride in a truck with a coilover lift. Thanks for all the info yall.
-Matt
most of the aftermarket springs will have higher spring rate for the "oem" shock, which with new shocks will make the front feel more stiff. "Jarring" may be a play on words since a good quality spring and shock (even at higher spring rate) can soak up "jarring" bumps better.

if you want more "plush" while still controlling the bumps, you need a long spring at lower rate. this may only be doable with a aftermarket coilover setup.
 

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mel22b said:
'the higher you crank them the stiffer the ride'

I am no suspension wiz but I was wondering if that is actually true. In the back of my mind I thought cranking the spring down only makes the initial movement change not the progression. I could be way off, but I thought I would ask.
Preload may be a bad way of thinking about this, seeing as in your mind you seem to be aware that preload gets replaced by actual load when the truck comes down off the jack, and all that results is the whole spring has been repositioned.

Possibly the most graphic way of visualizing the difference cranking them makes is by looking at the lower A-arms from the front (they're the ones that support the weight of the truck). On a stock truck, the lower A-arms are horizontal. If you visualize road bumps pushing the wheel end of the A-arm up and down, the forces are completely at right angles to the arm, and all that happens is it pivots around its bolts. The spring and shock are totally responsible for holding up the weight of the truck against the disturbance. When you lift the truck, the lower A-arms end up angled, with the wheel ends lower. Now any up and down forces applied through the wheels result in not just pivoting of the A-arms, but also a pushing or pulling component of force on them. This pushing and pulling is transmitted to the truck through the bolts, and the net effect is that some fraction of the disturbance bypasses the spring and shock and is applied directly to the truck through the A-arm bushings. Hence the suspension effectively gets stiffer.
 
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