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I just got a new 06 tacoma V6 4l 4 door 4x4. I would like to get more mpg out of my truck and was told that a cold air intake would do the trick. is this true or not? also will getting a new exaust do anything for mpg? Can somone help me out with some info ie what to buy or what can I do.
 

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It's going to depend on who you ask.

I have left my motor bone stock, and feel no need whatsoever to change air filters and mufflers.

My truck runs great as is.

Toyota engineered the crap out of these trucks, and they work very well indeed.
 

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You may see a slight increase in gas mileage depending on your truck, the intake you buy and the way you drive. Most buy one and like the sound so much they get on it more often thus negating any potential mpg gains. Having said that, even if you drive like an old lady you may not see much of an improvement. After installing mine, I saw a 1-2 mpg difference until I went to larger tires, which cancelled out any gain I may have had.
 

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Not to contradict anyone but: more air = more power = more fuel consumption = less mpg. If more air produced better mpg then Toyo (along with all the other manufactures) would have designed an open hood intake system in all their vehicles. I previously used the cold air and K&N filters without any increase in mpg. About the only effect I had was the sound of the intake sucking up air.
 

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If you want a simple yes or no - no. Not worth it.
 

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true more air,more fuel. or you will be running to lean and in danger of detonation. My only suggestion is that if you do put a cold air/ram air on you must buy an exhaust system . if you bring more air in and dont have a way to escape it you will put strain on the exhaust valves. i know from experience, i had a ranger i was building and i got the intake and couldent afford the exhaust for a while. like 3 monthes later i had a penny size hole in my #6 exhaust valve. not worth it.
 

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oh yeah, detonation occus in the normal operation of an engine, but its refered to as an uncontrolable explosion, and might end up with a hole in your block/cylinder. :2cents:
 

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AAATACO said:
Not to contradict anyone but: more air = more power = more fuel consumption = less mpg. If more air produced better mpg then Toyo (along with all the other manufactures) would have designed an open hood intake system in all their vehicles. I previously used the cold air and K&N filters without any increase in mpg. About the only effect I had was the sound of the intake sucking up air.
efficiency has nothing to do with more air and more fuel.

more power = more air + more fuel, and its not likely you'll be getting more air or more fuel from a NA motor by using a CAI. at best the CAI will help the motor breathe a tad easier, and maybe perhaps you'll see the motor be a tad more responsive from idle and maybe perhaps a tad more efficient but perhaps not measurable short term. hot or cold air in the intake, dont matter, the ECU will monitor AFR and make fuel adjustments accordingly....

i hear many using a CAI setup, but very few who did before and after dyno runs. in general, larger pumps (like 350cu.in. on up) will notice a suction restriction through the oem cruddy intake setup, so a CAI or just making a short straight run into the plenum makes a big diff for the motor.
 

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IMHO, most of these replies are correct in some way shape or form, except the increased mileage claim. It's fairly simple, cold air equals dense air, dense air equals more horsepower due to the increased number of oxygen molecules per square inch. It does not equate to better airflow or increased mileage, due to the fact that the computer needs to richen up the fuel circuit to compensate for the denser air. Do you see a slight increase in HP, most likely. Do you see better throttle response? Usually that answer is yes. Is it worth the hassle and expense? That's up to you. I personally don't like messing around with a system on a new truck that works straight from the factory. They open the hood and void your drivetrain warranty for this kind of stuff. I have to agree with Fastfrank on this one. Mine is stock and staying that way. This kind of stuff most always leads to other problems.
 

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Tuning is where it's at. I put a Volant intake and Borla Cat on my 06. Whenever you relocate your MAF like into the tube of a CAI you are throwing it all out of whack. As an example a K&N intake makes a 3.4 run really lean. The Volant on my 4.0 made it run slobbery rich when the ECU switched to Open loop. My AFR readings were off the chart on my first dyno pull.. somewhere in the 8-9 range. I bought a Split Second PSC1-001 and paid to have it installed and properly dyno and street tuned. I picked up 14HP and I now get 30-40 more miles to every tank of gas. These trucks run rich as they are from the factory.. For some more edumacation on the subject read this from Gadget

Have you ever wondered why some aftermarket bolt-on parts do not perform as you expected? Many performance parts can throw off the calibration of the Engine Control Unit (ECU). The stock calibration is setup for a stock vehicle. When you start modifying things, the stock calibration is thrown off and you end up with engine performance not living up to its potential.

By the time you finish reading this article you will have a better understanding of why performance tuning is the key to optimizing performance. Tuning ties your modifications together extracting the best possible performance from your modified vehicle.

Optimizing Fuel Mixture:


Fuel mixture optimization is key to extracting top performance from your vehicle. When the fuel mixture is too lean, power is lost and EGTs climb. When the fuel mixture is too rich, power is lost. When fuel mixture is just right, your engine will make maximum power and fuel economy may improve.



At full throttle you want your engine to make maximum power, not 15 horsepower less then its potential. The stock ECU calibration can run these engines at a very power robbing, overly rich fuel mixture. By slightly leaning out the stock engine’s fuel mixture, power increases significantly. In the example above a completely stock 2005 Tacoma X-Runner gained 15 horsepower by simply optimizing the fuel mixture. This was accomplished with a URD MAF Sensor Calibrator.

Every performance modification you make will tend to have some affect on the wide-open throttle fuel mixture. Every time you add a new performance modification you can quickly retune and optimize the fuel mixture to extract the most power possible from your expensive performance add-ons.

This is accomplished by increasing or decreasing the signal voltage from the MAF Sensor based on RPM and engine load. When the signal is increased the ECU will want to inject more fuel then its internal calibration would normally inject. The same works in reverse. When the signal voltage is decreased the ECU will inject less fuel. Throughout the RPM and load range there may be spots where we increase fuel and other spots where we decrease fuel to optimize the fuel mixture.


Sensor Error:

Underdog Racing Development (URD) markets a Supercharger performance Upgrade that includes upgraded injectors, a fuel pump, spark plugs, a cooler thermostat, and the finest end user tunable Performance Calibration Unit available for this application.

One day I tuned two customer trucks. Both trucks are supercharged 2001 Tacoma SRunners. They had the exact same modifications including the URD Supercharger Performance Upgrade Kit and URD’s 2.2” SuperGrip supercharger pulley.

I tuned the first truck and it ran superbly. The customer was really excited. When I started to tune the second truck, I loaded in the calibration map that I made on the first truck. It should have been a good fit for the second truck. To my surprise it was not a good map for the second truck. The second truck did not run nearly as well as the first truck. After I custom tuned the second truck, it was running just as well as the first. I then compared the two calibration maps and they were surprisingly very different. The reason why the maps were so different had to be found.

To investigate why the two identical trucks performed differently, I took the Mass Airflow Sensor (MAF) and Air/Fuel Ratio Sensor from the first truck and installed them in the second truck. The performance really dropped off. I then loaded the calibration map from the first truck in the second truck and it ran perfectly. What this demonstrated was that there was something different about the way the sensors read the data needed for the engine to operate properly. I suspected that there was a marginal error in the way that the sensors operate since both were clean.

A calibration engineer that worked for Toyota told me that Toyota and other OEMs allow a substantial error rate in MAF Sensors before they are rejected.

One of the ways auto manufacturers circumvent this MAF error rate to make full throttle overly rich to make sure the fuel mixture is not too lean thus possibly causing damage to the catalytic converter(s) or the engine. A fuel mixture that is overly rich can hurt performance. By recalibrating the signal from the MAF Sensor you can correct for the error rate of the sensor and get the fuel mixture where it needs to be for top power. We routinely see a power gain of 10-15 horsepower just from correcting the sensor error and optimizing the fuel mixture on totally stock Toyota Trucks.
 

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UKMyers said:
By the time you finish reading this article you will have a better understanding of why performance tuning is the key to optimizing performance. Tuning ties your modifications together extracting the best possible performance from your modified vehicle.
a very nice explanation and reason why everyone should be aware that, for mods that include sensors, tuning the mod into the system is key.

so that $250+ XYZ (you put whatever name you want for XYZ) slap-on cai just became a $400-500 mod (cai + tuning).

so is 15hp worth $400 ($26.6/hp) :eek: ?? thats up to you. it is however a very costly rate.
 

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X2 Empire. Those gains come at a high price tag. Plus, you never seem to be done fiddle freeking around with it, once you open that can-o-crap.
 

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Good stuff on the tuning...I took that for granted assuming that the modern engines were capable of performing the calibration necessary for optimum performance. I have an 06 that I would liek to get calibrated now sine i have the K&N intake on it. Is anybody aware of where to get this done? dealer? or is there a control unit that plugs in to the diagnostic port that you can buy to do yourself? (i.e. Hypertech tuner type of gizmo?)

I apologize if i sound a bit naive in this area....any info is much appreciated!
 

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It all depends....

On my 96 Tacoma (3.4L) that I used to have.... I ran a K&N filter plus the decplate mod (4" hole in airbox) and I got a slight gain in mpg (along with other mods too). Stock exhaust...

On my current vehicle (Dodge Ram 5.7L) - I installed flowmaster dual exhaust (CAT BACK) and increased about 3mpg. I then installed a cold air intake. The gas mileage dropped back down to stock gas mileage that I was getting 'before' the exhaust upgrade. Besides that..with the CAI - the cabin was NOISY as hell. Needless to say , I removed it and installed a K&N dropin filter. But again - that was on a Dodge Ram.

I think you will gain a little bit MPG by installing ONE or the OTHER - exhaust by itself or CAI by itself. But when you have both exhaust mods & air mods.... it sucks up the gas.
 

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remember that you m.a.f. must be a specific length from the actual intake manifold. like 14-18 inches or somthing like that.
 

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I like the idea abouth re-calibration, or just confirming it's dialed in, but just as a thought, for us Californiakians, we may end up in a world of hurt when it comes to passing the dreaded smog test, especially if you live in the valley (both North and South.) Maybe someone can chime in and prove me wrong...
 

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AAATACO said:
Not to contradict anyone but: more air = more power = more fuel consumption = less mpg. If more air produced better mpg then Toyo (along with all the other manufactures) would have designed an open hood intake system in all their vehicles. I previously used the cold air and K&N filters without any increase in mpg. About the only effect I had was the sound of the intake sucking up air.

Theirs a down side. Siting at a stop light, hot summer day all of the air is going to be hot as hell from being in the engine bay. Heat soak is not cool and intakes suck in the summer around town.

CAIs dont like to get wet and if your going to be off roading you can damage your motor from fording too deep of water. Also with both Short rams and CAIS you will get more dust in your engine bay.

some cars/trucks can cause to to run rich/lean without a tune.
 

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yota06taco said:
Good stuff on the tuning...I took that for granted assuming that the modern engines were capable of performing the calibration necessary for optimum performance. I have an 06 that I would liek to get calibrated now sine i have the K&N intake on it. Is anybody aware of where to get this done? dealer? or is there a control unit that plugs in to the diagnostic port that you can buy to do yourself? (i.e. Hypertech tuner type of gizmo?)

I apologize if i sound a bit naive in this area....any info is much appreciated!
Here is all you ever wanted to know about tuning

http://www.gadgetonline.com/U-Tune.pdf

First you need to goto URDUSA and get ya one of these

http://www.urdusa.com/product_info.php?cPath=66_72&products_id=1260198051

Then you need to get it installed and tuned. You'd be best off paying a performance shop to do this for you. It takes alot of gadgets to get into the ECU and see what your doing. For even more reading go to www.customtacos.com and type in PSC1-001 and you'll get hours of reading, installs, and dyno numbers.

Someone else hit the nail on the head though when they said it get's expensive. For what I gained the $800 bucks I spent on the intake, exhaust, and tuning is questionable on whether or not it was worth it. I figure over enough time it may be worth it with the mileage increase I got. When the ECU switches over to open loop at about 3200 rpm though it pulls WAY harder than it used to up the redline after leaning it out. It's been 3 months and I still get excited when I stand on it.
 

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yota06taco said:
Good stuff on the tuning...I took that for granted assuming that the modern engines were capable of performing the calibration necessary for optimum performance. I have an 06 that I would liek to get calibrated now sine i have the K&N intake on it. Is anybody aware of where to get this done? dealer? or is there a control unit that plugs in to the diagnostic port that you can buy to do yourself? (i.e. Hypertech tuner type of gizmo?)

I apologize if i sound a bit naive in this area....any info is much appreciated!
its a DIY if you jump into a piggyback unit like the MAP-ECU, or get a maf calibrator from urd. for the most part, seems like our trucks benefit from being able to tune them out, even if just oem with no mods.
 

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AAATACO said:
Not to contradict anyone but: more air = more power = more fuel consumption = less mpg. If more air produced better mpg then Toyo (along with all the other manufactures) would have designed an open hood intake system in all their vehicles. I previously used the cold air and K&N filters without any increase in mpg. About the only effect I had was the sound of the intake sucking up air.


Bingo
 
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