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Discussion Starter #1
Here is the long travel project that I have been working on for the past year. I've wanted a long travel Tacoma since I first saw the TC and camburg kits. After a fair amount of research I decided that I had all of the resources (engineering background, friends with fab skills) to build the suspension myself. I started with a 5lug 2wd Tacoma because the gas mileage was considerably better and I would be removing the front drive anyways. IMO the 5 lug brakes, spindles and bearings are too small for real off-road use so I modified spindles from a '93 toyota 4x4. By doing this I was able to use the larger calipers and hubs that come stock on 4x4s.

CAD:
I took all of the measurements from the stock suspension for a starting point. I made the LAA's 3" wider than stock then designed the spindles and UAA's around them. I would have gone wider if I were building an xtracab but I didn't want the track width to be too wide relative to the wheel base for sake of stability. I made quite a few iterations of the LAA's and spindles before I arrived at the final configuration. The main dilemma was whether or not to put the upper uniball horizontal or vertical which was the compromise between wheel travel and turning radius. I went the vertical upper uniball because the model showed that it would cycle 14" and still have about the same turning radius as stock suspension.
I decided to run little to no ackerman steering geometry which allowed me to nearly eliminate bump steer.

Fabrication:
Having everything designed on the computer made it a breeze when cutting everything out on the plasma table and fitting the pieces together.
The LAA's were plasma cut from 1/8" and 1/4" sheet with tubing to connect the heim joint in the front.
The stock '93 Toyota 4x4 spindles were cut up and the backsides were machined flat so all that remained was basically just the spindle snout and caliper mount. 1/8", 1/4" and 3/8" plate was then added to complete the spindles.
Most of the welding was done by Graeme at Gfab Motorsports in Bend, OR (He can lay down better looking beads than I can).

Install:
Gfab motorsports was nice enough to let me do the install in their shop. I was expecting to run into snags during the install given my past experience with projects of this nature but was surprised when everything went smoothly and fit together exactly like the computer model.

Testing:
Long travel is awesome and I had no idea what I was missing out on. I took it to the Oregon coast sand dunes for the initial testing. I ran it thru whoops until the rear shocks were too hot to touch. The front end floated over everything without bottoming but it became apparent that the rear end would need some work in order to keep up.

(I have 63" springs and Fox 2" emulsion shocks in the rear which get me about 12" of travel. I also have a TRD elocker rear axle so it is now 6 lug front and back.)

After testing, I realized that the rear shocks had way to much rebound valving which was causing it jack down in whoops and bottom out. They have been re-valved twice since and I now have them where they need to be.

Driving it on pavement is great, everything is stable and tight driving around town and on the highway. The only time I notice the lack of ackerman is when I have the steering locked on pavement which is really only when parking.

*I'm new to the forums and don't know the best way to add photos but I have more if someone is interested in seeing anything more specific.
 

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Nice job!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I used the locking hubs from a 4x4 because they have stronger bearings and spindles than the 5 lug. I left the locking mechanism on the hubs because I never got around to making caps for the hubs.
 
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