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Yeah, don't if you can help it. There are several layers to the motherboards, and pulling all the solder (sometimes even with braided copper, which is used for this) can knock a ring loose within the hole or damage a trace, then it's over.

If you need to replace a cap, just solder it to the surface as long as the hole is still full of metal. Best bet is to pull the cap at the legs by bending so the legs stay in and the contacts get pulled out, instead of actually removing the cap. This gives you something to solder to. Try using small wire cutters and cut the legs of the caps after you bend them over to the side. This leaves you the perfect point of contact for resoldering new cap on.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, don't if you can help it. There are several layers to the motherboards, and pulling all the solder (sometimes even with braided copper, which is used for this) can knock a ring loose within the hole or damage a trace, then it's over.

If you need to replace a cap, just solder it to the surface as long as the hole is still full of metal. Best bet is to pull the cap at the legs by bending so the legs stay in and the contacts get pulled out, instead of actually removing the cap. This gives you something to solder to. Try using small wire cutters and cut the legs of the caps after you bend them over to the side.
there are holes on the mobo that are filled which need to be removed so i can add a component.
 

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Oh and I have a switch I'm replacing some caps on too. If you EVER want to buy a motherboard, and you see "teapo" brand caps, avoid it. Teapo "cheapo" caps fail before any others. They all fail in the end, but these will go way before the rest.
 

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there are holes on the mobo that are filled which need to be removed so i can add a component.
Hmm...

Unless it's a high current plug, you don't have to remove the solder. You can just solder it as a surface contact. If you just want to get legs through though, hold the board still with a third hand or other method, and heat the backside while pushing the legs from the front. That will work, but don't bake it with the iron any more than you have to.
 

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Oh I see, yeah just solder it as a surface mount, it will be fine. Put a dab on the legs, then contact them on the points and heat right above the solder on the leg. It'll contact perfectly :)
 

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Those are bad for motherboards though. I know some techs and overclockers that won't even consider using them for motherboard work. They loosen those little rings and sometimes even remove them with the force they apply. Once that ring is gone, you aint recovering, period.
 

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if you dont use a temperature controlled iron on theese multilayer boards you can really fawk them up.. i do a ton of surface mount solderig off the back of a tailgate in the field :D those things are cake
gimme a ring in a day or two and ill help ya out
 

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Use a solder sucker, you can get one at any electronice store. Heat the solder just to the melting point then hit the trigger on the solder sucker and, zap, solder is gone.
Then again, "LAW" would probably be the safest if he can help. Sounds like he knows how to do it.
 

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Desoldering

Again with my job in electronics, we use what is called solder wick, you can also find it at radio shack. PLace the wick over the solder to be removed, add heat , and it pulls the solder away. I highly recomend this in place of solder suckers.
 
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