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Discussion Starter #1
I need to replace the front bearing in my alternator but there are 2 for different amperages. I looked at the numbers on the alternator, but they didnt clearly reveal anything. It is a toyoda part (denso) this is what is on there:

2706-3.5 (more #'s but they could not be read)
10 02 11 - 3 1 60
5116

it is either an 80 amp or 50,55,60 (as per the two different applications)

The truck is an 89 22re

Any ideas?
 

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My guess is that it's the 60 amp but I can't tell you for sure.
Here's an idea though. Send it to Boyles and have them do it for you while getting it up amped at the same time. That way you kill two birds with one stone.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am actually not familiar with boyles... would that be better than buying a higher amp alt?
 

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Boyles Future Technology will take your 60 amp and make it something like a 120 amp for far less than the other assholes want for a high output alternator or even a rewind. And they will do it the right way with a Y wind and up amped diodes.
For some silly reason, probably stupidity, you can get a Powermaster for a Chevy or Ford app for $150 or so but for Toyota they want 3 or 4 hundred for the same damn thing. Most folks know that both Ford and Toyota use Nippoin Denso alternators, and now there are as many Toyotas on American roads as Fords so what's the logical reason? What ever it is, I just won't play that silly game so found out about the Boyle's folks in Auburn, CA. I think Parts Mike turned me on to them. So far I have never heard of anything but happy Boyle's customers, including myself.
 

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Both Molly and I have had our alternators done by Boyles and they're GREAT. I specifically told him I wanted max ouput at low RPM's (even at the expense of maximum output) and they tried several different things to see which worked best. They provide a "cert" showing how many amps it's putting out throughout the RPM range.

The only thing I didn't really like is the regulator is set at about 13.8V - I would prefer it was maxed out at closer to 15V (but I didn't ask anything about it when ordering it either)

Cost is around $100. Search for Boyle to get their addy and digits
 

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Lead Acid battery cells don't like...

charge voltages beyond 14.4 volts. The nominal max charge range for any 12v lead acid is from 13.8 to 14.4 volts, and depends on temp and specific gravity of the electrolyte.

A properly designed regulator will trim charge voltage back to 12.6 when the batt is up to full charge.

Boyles knows their stuff, and I expect they would not setup a charging circuit to output above 14.4v.
 
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