TTORA Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought some used Donahoes and am having issues installing them. The drivers side coilover went in just fine, but the passenger side coilover is giving me issues. I sent Donahoe an email regarding the problem, but thought I would check to see if someone could help me out on here.

On the drivers side coilover the schrader valve was pointing straight out (as I believe it is supposed to be). However, the passenger side was different. Due to the position of the lower bushing the schrader valve was facing toward the cab and was hardly accesible due to the strut mounting plate (metal on truck). So, instead of the Dr logo (and valve) pointing straight out, the hole about an inch to the right of the valve was lined up with the front mounting hole. Is there anyway to adjust the coilover on the upper or lower portion so the schrader valve is aligned with the center... Maybe I haven't explained this well, so bare with me please. Thanks!
 

·
Going John Galt
Joined
·
31,839 Posts
Adam said:
I recently bought some used Donahoes and am having issues installing them. The drivers side coilover went in just fine, but the passenger side coilover is giving me issues. I sent Donahoe an email regarding the problem, but thought I would check to see if someone could help me out on here.

On the drivers side coilover the schrader valve was pointing straight out (as I believe it is supposed to be). However, the passenger side was different. Due to the position of the lower bushing the schrader valve was facing toward the cab and was hardly accesible due to the strut mounting plate (metal on truck). So, instead of the Dr logo (and valve) pointing straight out, the hole about an inch to the right of the valve was lined up with the front mounting hole. Is there anyway to adjust the coilover on the upper or lower portion so the schrader valve is aligned with the center... Maybe I haven't explained this well, so bare with me please. Thanks!
the coilover can be mounted in 3 different positions as the three bolt holes are equidistant. try that to reposition the schraeder valve to where you need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
yes... the mounting holes are equidistant, but can only be mounted 1 way due to the lower mount. Do you understand what I am saying? The orientation of the lower mount to the schrader valve is different on both coilovers. On one coilover the opening on the lower bushing is directly inline with the schrader valve... on the other coilover the schrader valve is inline with the mount (the hole is sideways). The second orientation is the one which i was able to install easily. How can I adjust the other to make the orientation similar?

If you look at this picture you will see how the schrader valve is orientated in relation to the lower bushing. That is how it looks on the coilover that I could install easily on the driver side. On the other coilover of mine the schrader valve is positioned where you could look through the
lower bushing hole....

http://www.off-road.com/toyota/tech/donahoe_tacoma/600px/4.jpg

According to Donahoe the schrader valve should be pointing straight out, so there must be some way to adjust the upper or lower portion to make this correct... I obviously have no idea how to adjust them, so excuse my ignorance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That is exactly the answer I am looking for if that will work... I figured I could do something simple like that, but didn't want to damage my donahoes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Adam said:
That is exactly the answer I am looking for if that will work... I figured I could do something simple like that, but didn't want to damage my donahoes!
thats how you do it, bolt the top up in the olocation it needs to go in then take a screwdriver and turn the lower heim, dont be afraid to handle it, it will move...
 

·
Going John Galt
Joined
·
31,839 Posts
Adam said:
yes... the mounting holes are equidistant, but can only be mounted 1 way due to the lower mount. Do you understand what I am saying? The orientation of the lower mount to the schrader valve is different on both coilovers. On one coilover the opening on the lower bushing is directly inline with the schrader valve... on the other coilover the schrader valve is inline with the mount (the hole is sideways). The second orientation is the one which i was able to install easily. How can I adjust the other to make the orientation similar?

If you look at this picture you will see how the schrader valve is orientated in relation to the lower bushing. That is how it looks on the coilover that I could install easily on the driver side. On the other coilover of mine the schrader valve is positioned where you could look through the
lower bushing hole....

http://www.off-road.com/toyota/tech/donahoe_tacoma/600px/4.jpg

According to Donahoe the schrader valve should be pointing straight out, so there must be some way to adjust the upper or lower portion to make this correct... I obviously have no idea how to adjust them, so excuse my ignorance!
I was hoping Corey (deserttrd) would see this. follow his advice ;) I was wondering about the screwdriver idea but I have SAWs and they are positioned upside down to the Hoes and wasn't sure the precedure would be the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
The valve should be mounted as per the instructions, pointing out. The passangers side is difficult. I did mine by myself. Trick is get a crow bar or long screw driver some type of prying device. Put it in through the upper a-arm and under the bolt,IMPORTANT: watch for the break line and abs sensor I put a rag around my prybar so I didn't scratch anything. The bushings in the stock upper a-arms are tight. Push down on the prybar hard it helps if you have a friend. The bottom of the coilover will pivot to line up the hole. The bolt on the bottom must go in from the rear so that the head of the bolt is at the rear and the nut is at the front. That way nothing will hit the cv joint. If I rember right the break line bracket on the spindle will hit, be very careful to bend it out of the way but not to far as the stock break lines are fragil. Usually Donahoe sets them perfect but you said that you got them used. So get a strap wrench or spanner and turn them down it might be easier to extend after install. Good luck and hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,538 Posts
DylanDr said:
Thanks everyone for chiming in and helping Adam. Sounds like you got it handled befor I got to this thread.

Dylan, I was told that most/some/all (rather specific :) ) resovoir shocks really don't do much in way of transferring the fluid from res to rest of shock.
therefore, not really worth the extra $$.
whats your take on this??
thx in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the help everyone! I just finished installing them and my truck rides so awesome now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Dylan, I was told that most/some/all (rather specific :) ) resovoir shocks really don't do much in way of transferring the fluid from res to rest of shock.
therefore, not really worth the extra $$.
whats your take on this??
thx in advance[/QUOTE]

It depends on how much the shock is being cycled, the shock cycling is what pumps fluid back and forth between the shock and the reservoir. If the shaft is moving back and forth 1 inch then the fluid is just moving back and forth in the hose and not fully circulating into the reservoir. But when you’re not using a lot of travel you’re not creating a lot of heat either and the reservoir cooling isn’t as crucial. As the shaft travel goes up it exchanges fluid with the reservoir better but it also creates more heat making the reservoir more important.

My opinion is, if you have room for the reservoir and can afford it go for it. Like any rear custom mount application.

Also a reservoir shock is going to be more compact and have more travel for a given eye to eye measurement because the nitrogen and floating piston are located outside the main body.

Reservoir placement is important also! You want to put the reservoir in a place were it can dissipate heat. So up somewhere were it can get air flow over it is best.

But there is a catch!
If the hose is more than about 2 times the stroke length it is not going to be as good at exchanging fluid. So on a vehicle like ours were the shock is only cycling about 5 inches when you are really pounding it through all its travel and the valving is aggressive to control an A-arm style vehicle a reservoir isn’t going to do much especially if you mounted it far enough away to get good air flow.
There are ways around this issue if necessary…… I made a custom circulation system to try on our race truck it almost kept the shocks to cool.

It is also a misconception that heat is bad! It is a necessary part of the operation of a shock….That’s what there supposed to do is convert mechanical energy to heat energy. Heat is bad when it gets to the point were the oil starts breaking down and the shaft seals fail. It is also difficult if you are operating over a large temperature range to get the tuning consistent.

I have pre run in my truck, working it hard for up to 100 miles without stopping to let things cool and yes the shock are hot but well within the temperature rage of the fluid and the seals. The rear 2”x 10” reservoir shocks usually get hotter (more shaft travel less diameter and surface area) they will sizzle when you squirt them with a water bottle.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
About this Discussion
11 Replies
7 Participants
DylanICON
TTORA Forum
TTORA forum is the best Toyota off-road club around. We are nation wide with chapters in most states. Come in and discuss Tacoma, 4Runner, Highlander, & TRD models.
Full Forum Listing
Top