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http://www.elkodaily.com/articles/2005/02/23/news/local/news2.txt


Feds claim 91.9% of Nevada

By JEFFRY MULLINS - Editor

ELKO - Nevada is getting smaller.

At least the parts of it that Nevadans can call their own.

All but 8.1 percent of the state is in the hands of federal agencies,
according to an inventory by the U.S. General Services Administration.

This information is not new. The 91.9 percent calculation of federal
land
comes from a 2003 report by GSA. However, lawmakers and state officials
continue to quote a lower figure of 87 percent when talking about the
amount
of federal land in Nevada, and the state Department of Conservation &
Natural Resources posts an even lower 86.1 percent on its Web site.

The federal inventory was discovered by Grant Gerber of Elko while he
was
doing research for the Private Lands Conservancy. The Elko-based group
chaired by Gerber seeks to increase the amount of private land in
Nevada, as
well as other states.

"For several years my research has indicated that 87 percent was low,"
Gerber told the Elko Daily Free Press. " I have been saying in excess of
88
percent."

Federal land managers keep close tabs on their holdings in each state,
but
the GSA report consolidates statistics from all departments. Lands
controlled by the Department of Defense and Indian reservations
apparently
were not included in earlier estimates.

However, the amount of federal land in Nevada is still growing,
according to
Gerber, thanks to legislation such as the Southern Nevada Public Land
Management Act.

Because of the vast difference in property values between the northern
and
southern part of the state, the federal government is able to purchase
more
acres than it sells. Eighty-five percent of SNPLMA funds are set aside
to
buy land, giving the federal government $1.5 billion to spend.

Ranchers, who hold much of the private land in the state, also have
become
more willing to sell to the government because of environmental lawsuits
that make it more costly to run their ranches.

"Since the 2003 report by the GSA, the federal government has been
buying
far more acres than it has been selling," Gerber said.

The previous GSA report, from 2002, lists Nevada at 91.7 percent.

Gerber believes a thorough inventory would reveal that less than 8
percent
of Nevada is in private hands.

"The 91.9 percent of land in Nevada claimed by the federal government,
when
added to the 0.4 percent owned by the State of Nevada, increases
government
ownership to 92.3 percent," Gerber said.

"The federal government claims 64,589,139.3 acres and Nevada claims
approximately 250,000 acres. This leaves 5,425,000 acres in private
lands,
or 7.7 percent," he calculated.

The difference between 87 percent federal ownership and 91.9 percent is
not
small.

"This discrepancy of 4.9 percent translates to 3,442,950.7 acres, or an
area
larger than the State of Connecticut, Gerber said.

And both the state and federal government plan to purchase more land in
the
future, he believes.

Many Nevadans support more government ownership or control of land in
the
state. In 2003, Nevadans voted to spend $100 million in taxpayer dollars
to
preserve "open space" by voting for Question 1 on the state ballot.

On the other hand, many residents in northeastern Nevada are opposed to
the
trend. That same year, Gerber's Private Lands Conservancy and the Elko
Daily
Free Press sponsored a poll of readers' attitudes toward land ownership.
A
total of 88 percent opposed any additional purchases by the federal
government.

"As the private land base shrinks, the number of people willing to fight
against more government purchases is reduced," Gerber said. "As more
people
are hired to administer the additional government land, those new hires
then
support more government purchases of private land."

Each acre removed from private ownership also cuts into the tax base.
Counties receive "payment in lieu of taxes" on some federal land, but
the
program has never been fully funded and President Bush is proposing
cutbacks
in his budget.
 

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I'm not surprised.....and well, let's face it. There is not going to be much money to manage some of these vast lands in the near future. So, leave them unmanaged, and make your prerunner fast, so you don't get corralled while having fun!!! What the heck else are you to do??
 

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rojodiablo said:
I'm not surprised.....and well, let's face it. There is not going to be much money to manage some of these vast lands in the near future. So, leave them unmanaged, and make your prerunner fast, so you don't get corralled while having fun!!! What the heck else are you to do??
you are an idiot, please go sell your truck so you dont make us all look bad
 

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That thread title just makes me laugh...i'm not sure why.
 

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i have family in nevada, outside Carson, and nobody really cares, they just cheer us on, HOPINg we flip.nobody is gonna do anything, what else are they gonna do with a whole bunch of nothing anyway?
 

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drabnor said:
you are an idiot, please go sell your truck so you dont make us all look bad
It was a JOKE. You know, like a silly impulse??? Grow down; I 'aint growin' up on account of you. Look at it this way, at least Boxer and Feinstien don't directly manage it!!!
 

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Here in Texas the opposite is true. Most of us off-roaders in Texas wish the government would buy up more land. Over 90% of the state is privately-owned, and Texans don't take too kindly to trespassin'. One of the few remaining legal spots to wheel on were just taken away by the government - dry river beds owned by the state. When the law was passed to take away dry river beds, a promise was made to make available new areas for us off-roaders to use. But budget cuts and lack of funding made that an unfunded mandated. So now we have even less government owned land to legally off-road in. I guess Nevada and Texas are examples of going from one extreme to another.
 

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As a former Nevadan I can say it isn't that bad. A large portion of the mentioned land is BLM. That means you can do just about whatever you want. The state is huge and probably offers more miles of public offroading terrain than 95% of the country. Maybe goverment control isn't the best, but it's better than:

NO TRESPASSING: PRIVATE PROPERTY

Which is becoming the real problem for us. It's all to common that an adventure ends at a barbed wire fence with signs reading the above. or TRESPASSERS WILL BE SHOT
 

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There's nothin' wrong with sharing.

I like Nevada. Fun place, if you've got loads of time and gasoline.
Edit: And beer.
 
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