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I'm considering sprigning for a halon extinguisher. The h3r brand looks good. Any reason why halon might be a bad choice? I know it's great in terms of not damaging the electrics...but they're not so great on class A fires. How concerned about class A should I be? Any comments would be appreciated.

Also, anyone found any really good and affordable mounting brackets/solutions? I'm looking for something that would stand up to a roll over accident at speed. Most of the brackets I've seen look dubious to handling this type of force.

Thanks for the help! Oh and HAPPY NEW YEAR!
 

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Herradura said:
I'm considering sprigning for a halon extinguisher. The h3r brand looks good. Any reason why halon might be a bad choice? I know it's great in terms of not damaging the electrics...but they're not so great on class A fires. How concerned about class A should I be? Any comments would be appreciated.

Also, anyone found any really good and affordable mounting brackets/solutions? I'm looking for something that would stand up to a roll over accident at speed. Most of the brackets I've seen look dubious to handling this type of force.

Thanks for the help! Oh and HAPPY NEW YEAR!
I read/heard several yrs ago that they stopped using halon in computer rooms
because they discovered that it actually does more damage t oelectronics then water. Don't know the how correct this info is.

if memory serves me correctly, calss A is paper, wood etc fire. I would thin this would be necc not as much for truck but while in the woods, forest desert etc.
 

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Halon

Most federal agencys have replaced halon with other agents because of halon's toxicity. You might want to consider one of the other ones too, halon is pretty lethal.
 

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We use halon where I work and I would not suggest it for a truck application. Halon actually replaces O2 and depletes the oxygen that the fire has to burn. We use it for compartment fires on the flightline but if you ever used it around people or anything living it would kill it. As for electronics it is actually bad. It comes out to cold and will cause a thermal shock to anything it touches (it is stored in liquid form and then once expelled from an extinguisher turns into a vapor). I believe that it isn't produced anymore but am unsure. Its a bad thing to mess with unless you have a SCBA (self contained breathing apperatus). I would suggest another type. I know 3m has come out with tons of new agents in the past few years. There is even a K class extinguisher in use now for grease fire applications. Just take your time and research it well. There are much better systems and agents out there.
 

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ANY fire you have in your truck minus oil/gas or electrical fire is going to be a Class A (Ordinary combustibles). An electrical fire (Class C) is going to become a Class A fire soon enough.

Best thing to do is get a ABC dry chemical extinguisher. Yes, it makes a mess, but does it really matter?

Halon, like said before, depletes the area of oxygen. In an open truck, this wouldn't be too big of a deal. Even if in the immediate area that it is used, the efects would be little.
 

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HALOTRON is what you want...

http://www.h3r.com/products/a384t.htm

Halon was the old type, now Halotron is the replacement and is required in most race applications from what I researched.

My research also indicated you dont want to be using dry chemical extinguishers in your vehicles because of the corroding effects on the electronics and the metal in your vehicle.
 

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Halon Fire Extinguishers

Hello,

This is a great site. I worked for Toyota for 11 years, most of them in
Tokyo. Great products! I now work for H3R. Thanks to all who posted a link
to our site. We’ve had a number of hits.

There is a lot of confusion in the marketplace regarding halon. Please allow
me to clarify.

Halon remains the most effective clean agent available – twice as effective
as halon alternatives (e.g. a 1.25lb halon extinguisher is equal in
firepower to a 2.5lb Halotron extinguisher. AND, lb for lb halon is less
expensive!).

According to the Halon Alternatives Research Corporation (www.harc.org), a
non-profit trade association that is looking for alternatives to halon,
halon is “remarkably safe.” Halon is recommended by the FAA and by the
Department of Motor Vehicles. It is not harmless, but certainly not the
lethal agent some suggest. C02 is the agent that removes oxygen from the
air. In addition, while C02 can “cold shock” electronics because it exits
the nozzle freezing cold, this is absolutely not the case for halon.

Regarding halon’s effectiveness on class A (wood and paper) fires, it is
effective, but not as effective as dry chemical extinguishers. But dry
chemical extinguishers cause major corrosive damage to surface finishes and
electronics, and are nearly impossible to clean up. I had an aviation
manufacturer who had to scrap a plane – not from fire damage, but from dry
chemical damage! Halon extinguishers don’t typically receive an “A” rating
unless they contain 9lbs of agent. Halon IS more effective than C02, which
has zero effectiveness on class A fires, regardless of the amount of agent
used.

Sorry for rambling. Give me a call with questions (800-249-4289). No
pressure to purchase – halon sells itself once its true benefits are known.

Chris

Chris Dieter
Marketing & Distribution Manager
H3R, Inc.
Tel: 800-249-4289 ext. 12
Fax: 415-945-0311
www.h3r.com
 
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