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I have a 2 car garage with a sectional roll-up door. Because it is facing south, during the summer time, it's impossible to work in there from 1pm till midnight, just too damn hot. I did a little research, this company came up: Texas Garages. they have the common foam panels also I'm more interested in the reflective foil type insulation. Anybody has any first hand dope on how effictive of this stuff?

http://www.texasgarages.com/insulation.htm

 

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I've never used the reflective stuff except to insulate cars and camelbacks from the sun, but I can say a heavily insulated garage door works wonders for temperature control. My garage is much more stable...but I went from a shitty paper-thin sheetmetal door to a heavy gauge door, double walled, with 2" of foam core.

Start by insulating your door...you can get foam sheets at the hardware store for about ten bucks each...stick them on the back of your existing door, it'll make a huge difference and the weight is negligible, so you won't need to change the spring over the door.

-Sean
 

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the reason i'm looking into the foil type is because it can reflect the radiant heat in some degree. right now it feels like under sunlight by standing about a foot behine the closed garage door. it could help keeping warm in the winter, too. again, i have no experience with it first hand.
 

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My garage faces north so the sun on the door is not really a problem, but since it's over 100 outside, any radiant heat blocking helps. Next thing is to insulate the attic, which covers half the garage. The other half is my upstairs living room.
 

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My garage faces north so the sun on the door is not really a problem, but since it's over 100 outside, any radiant heat blocking helps. Next thing is to insulate the attic, which covers half the garage. The other half is my upstairs living room.
that kind of heat or cold you need to insulate what you can no doubt
 

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I switched mine from an insulated door to an un insulated and noticed zero difference at all. As the guy pointed out the all gaps in the door, adding an inch of foam in the middle of it will do nothing. To keep the heat out, you have to keep the sun off the door to begin with. I have thought about adding a roll up screen in front of it to keep the sun off of it, but think that might look too ghetto. Plus sweat makes clean up easier.
 

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I've never used the reflective stuff except to insulate cars and camelbacks from the sun, but I can say a heavily insulated garage door works wonders for temperature control. My garage is much more stable...but I went from a shitty paper-thin sheetmetal door to a heavy gauge door, double walled, with 2" of foam core.

Start by insulating your door...you can get foam sheets at the hardware store for about ten bucks each...stick them on the back of your existing door, it'll make a huge difference and the weight is negligible, so you won't need to change the spring over the door.

-Sean
Same here. Our new house has a foam-core insulated garage door and it's remarkable how much it helps.
 

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My garage faces north so the sun on the door is not really a problem, but since it's over 100 outside, any radiant heat blocking helps. Next thing is to insulate the attic, which covers half the garage. The other half is my upstairs living room.
Your attic isn't insulated?
 

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the reason i'm looking into the foil type is because it can reflect the radiant heat in some degree. right now it feels like under sunlight by standing about a foot behine the closed garage door. it could help keeping warm in the winter, too. again, i have no experience with it first hand.
Yeah, but you're not gonna get enough direct sunlight to make any difference in the winter time anyway...well, maybe a little in Texas.
 

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that stuff's pretty decent, but I couldn't say it's any better than the rigid foam they put in there. You need to also look at the insulation the attic above your garage, if it's a single story house. Most every house I go in on claims has no insulation over the garage. It's usually just not necessary since most people are only in the garage long enough to walk from the door to their car when they leave and from the car to the door when they get home. It's amazing what a difference it makes when you insulate the ceiling over the garage, since something like 75% of heat/cooling loss is through the ceiling.

edit: there ya go Hoss. Pretty common construction technique.
 

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Your attic isn't insulated?
Not the garage attic. There isn't even any plywood flooring up there.

I have a 2 story. Garage is on the left side. Right half is under the house, the left side has it's own roofing. Under that roofing they never thought to put insulation. They just sheetrocked the garage and called it a day :mad:

I need to take everything out up there and lay down fiberglass and plywood. Might be real nice to put a thermally controlled fan in the attic, pushing out of the attic vent. I might just put a manual fan instead, on the light switch for the 11x7 shop at the back. Haven't made a decision yet.
 

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I called the garage company who installed my door, got to know mine has already been insulated but with a shitty thin layer of plastic. I'm gonna buy a piece of 4'x8' x1" foam panel from HD to test out on one section see if makes any difference.

I have 10' ceilling in the garage and it's insulated, at least that part I don't have to worry about.
 

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that stuff's pretty decent, but I couldn't say it's any better than the rigid foam they put in there. You need to also look at the insulation the attic above your garage, if it's a single story house. Most every house I go in on claims has no insulation over the garage. It's usually just not necessary since most people are only in the garage long enough to walk from the door to their car when they leave and from the car to the door when they get home. It's amazing what a difference it makes when you insulate the ceiling over the garage, since something like 75% of heat/cooling loss is through the ceiling.

edit: there ya go Hoss. Pretty common construction technique.
that is how my garage is, fully sheetrocked but no insulation. I would love to insulate my garage attic, but I don't want to pull up the plywood decking to do it.
 

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there are companies that can put blown in insulation w/ out tearing out the decking above. They make an injection hole in the drywall or the plywood and blow in the insulation through that.

My in-laws just finished building a house, and their insulation is amazing. They did the expanding foam insulation on the underside of the roof decking, and their attic is almost as cool as the rest of the house. The 2nd floor a/c isn't even turned on, and it's completely comfortable even in good ol' 100 degree heat. Basically, their house is like a huge coleman cooler.
 

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there are companies that can put blown in insulation w/ out tearing out the decking above. They make an injection hole in the drywall or the plywood and blow in the insulation through that.

My in-laws just finished building a house, and their insulation is amazing. They did the expanding foam insulation on the underside of the roof decking, and their attic is almost as cool as the rest of the house. The 2nd floor a/c isn't even turned on, and it's completely comfortable even in good ol' 100 degree heat. Basically, their house is like a huge coleman cooler.
how expensive is this expanding foam insulation? what happens if you have to replace a section of plywood when you have your roof replaced?
 

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I want to know about that as well.

If you lose some ply, you lose the insulation for that part as well. Just takes a small respray.

Only issue I can see is if a nail slides out over time and you get a leak, the ply might rot before you know about it.
 

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Yeah, plastic sheeting != insulation.

2" foam core will help with the feeling of standing in the sun behind a closed garage door...in fact, it'll help quite a bit. In addition, like BBH said, close the door, turn off the lights, and look around the door for places where you've convective transfer (ie gaps). I figure it's good to have some gaps top and bottom for some circulation and in the event of a gas leak (whatever sort of gas) so it doesn't build in the garage, but they don't need to be huge.

I was able to fix a problem gap between the seal and the door with a piece of sticky backed, closed cell foam against the frame around the door...just gotta make sure the door won't tear it, opening and closing.
 

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Only issue I can see is if a nail slides out over time and you get a leak, the ply might rot before you know about it.
If your roof was installed properly, with the correct shingle fasteners, nail-pops should be a non issue. You might just have to get up on the roof and check a couple of times a year.

On the expanding foam, I'm not sure how much it is, nor do I know how easy a retrofit is w/ that stuff. I know I want it in my house. Since it was built in 1945, i'm sure there's no insulation in the walls (but it takes me 5 minutes to get to downtown). On the plywood issue, as long as your roof isn't leaking when you put it on, there's no reason for it to start unless you have wind/hail damage, or you let your roof go to shit. I think it would be worth it just for the effect it would have on your heating/cooling bills and the lifespan of your heating/cooling system. I want to do the roof and the walls w/ it.

Here's a couple of companies I found in Houston:

http://foamhouston.com/
http://www.a1foam.com/
 

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I have a 2 car garage that faces west, and in the afternoon till late in the evening I had sunlight directly on the door. I biult a 2 car carport over the driveway in front of the garage door, and it made a world of difference. I can actually work in the garage w/o dealing with the radiant heat... its still hot, but nearly as bad.
Its an expensive fix, but it serves a double purpose.... I can work in the driveway even when it rains, and it is great when I wash my vehicles.... Im not in the sun dying of heat stroke!
 
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