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Discussion Starter #21
I think I'm getting somewhere, cheap!!

I went to HD this afternoon, for $10 bought 1" thick 4'x8' Dow SUPER TUFF-R insulation board. it has reflective paper on each side, one is blue another is silver, bingo! spent a long time using the rule of measure 10 times and cut once, made 4 panels, put them in like sliding doors, push up, pull down, they sit really really tight. I'm getting 3 more boards tomorrow. Here is what's look like:



after let is sit for 2 hours, the room tempture 3 feet away from the door is 89F


garage door section with out insulation: 89F


garage door secotion covered with insulation right next to the previous one: 82F



I can have it all covered up for $40 after tax with 10% off coupon from post office. one side note, it's very very light weight, so I wn't have to worry about it adding stress to the lifting motor.
 

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You did it wrong though. You're supposed to cover the frame bars, too. Otherwise you negate the reflection, since you basically have hot (and possibly hotter, now) metal exchanging heat to inside air, just in a smaller area.

Look closer at the top picture^^ ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #23
that will be the next task, though, after all the door sections are finished. it's not possible with what i have, different panel construction than the one on top. for now, there isn't any type of adhesive involved, i have not yet figure out how to do the crossbars. the 89F tempture i took was not on bare metal, it has already been covered by the factory insulation, it's just not thick enough.
 

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....Nathan (tejas), did you insulate?
Not yet...sorry for the late response, just returned from a trip from Mexico.

My garage door, outside walls and ceiling are not insulated. Only the interior walls to my home. Not yet sure if I will insulate..but if I do, I would replace the whole door. But that would only be good if you also insulate your walls and ceiling.

When I lived in NC, I did the same thing as 99sr54wd, the temperature also reduced a little, but not enough to justify the cost and time to install.

If you are going to do this, do it right. So if I do this, I would replace the doors and for the outside wall (only one), I could do blow in insulation.
Then the ceiling is easy to access to lay down batting.

Then to finally make it worth it, install a mini-split HVAC system for the garage only.

At least that is my plan....yours will be different based on needs, location and amount of money you want to spend. :D
 

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My old POS door already had foam in the crossbars...they called it "partially insulated." I called it crap. If yours are already done, no need...otherwise, squirt some expanding foam in the holes and kick back with a beer in your 10* cooler garage.

-Sean
 

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I apologize for the bump...
I've been battling heat in my shop since I moved into my current home eight years ago. I live in SoCal, and my garage door faces west. The afternoon sun has always heated up the shop to levels that make me spend less time in the shop.

I added a mini-split HVAC, and that helped enormously. But in the summer, when the outdoor temps can get over 90 degrees (sometimes over 100), and the afternoon sun is beating on the garage door, my mini-split had no hope of keeping up, and shop temps would climb.

I insulated the walls and ceiling, and that definitely helped. But my mini-split was still no match for the summer afternoon heat.

So, I got a thermal imaging camera. I learned a few important things that have helped get the heat under control.

First, the uninsulated steel garage doors were acting as a giant radiator. I knew that, but I didn't realize just how much that contributed to the problem. On those 90 degree days with the sun beating on the door, the temp of the outside of the garage doors would get over 120 degrees. The inside of the doors would get over 110. Since my shop is a 3-car garage, that's a lot of heat! No wonder the inside of the shop kept getting so warm.

I bought those garage door insulation kits from a big box store like this https://mechanicguides.com/best-garage-door-insulation-kit/ (I think HD). That made a significant difference, but the doors were still a big radiator. Instead of the inside of the door registering 110 degrees, it would get up to the high 90s. That's a 10-15 degree drop, but my mini-split still struggled to take all that heat out of the shop.

A few months ago, I upgraded my garage doors to some of those R-18 super-insulated garage doors (with no windows). That has made an enormous difference. We haven't yet had any 90+ degree weather this year, but so far, the inside of my garage doors has stayed pretty close to the ambient temp in my shop. So, whatever heat the sun is putting onto the garage door's exterior is mostly not making its way into the shop.

People get fixated on seals. In some circumstances, bad seals can be the culprit. But keep in mind that the job of the seals is to keep the heat/cold in the AMBIENT air outside from getting inside. When you have a West-facing garage door and the sun is beating on your garage door in the afternoon, the ambient outside temperate is really not the problem. The problem is that the sun is super-heating the exterior surface of your garage door to a temperature that can be 20-30 degrees hotter than the outside air. That's a much bigger problem than bad seals. I'm not saying that seals don't matter; I am saying that getting as much insulation as possible on the surface of your garage door is much more critical than seals for controlling heat if you have a West-facing door and you want to keep your shop cool. At least, that has been my experience.

The thermal imaging camera also gave me some additional insights. I had extensive fluorescent lighting throughout the shop, and the camera showed just how much heat those were putting out. So, I changed to LED lighting. Enormous improvement.
 

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I apologize for the bump...
I've been battling heat in my shop since I moved into my current home eight years ago. I live in SoCal, and my garage door faces west. The afternoon sun has always heated up the shop to levels that make me spend less time in the shop.

I added a mini-split HVAC, and that helped enormously. But in the summer, when the outdoor temps can get over 90 degrees (sometimes over 100), and the afternoon sun is beating on the garage door, my mini-split had no hope of keeping up, and shop temps would climb.

I insulated the walls and ceiling, and that definitely helped. But my mini-split was still no match for the summer afternoon heat.

So, I got a thermal imaging camera. I learned a few important things that have helped get the heat under control.

First, the uninsulated steel garage doors were acting as a giant radiator. I knew that, but I didn't realize just how much that contributed to the problem. On those 90 degree days with the sun beating on the door, the temp of the outside of the garage doors would get over 120 degrees. The inside of the doors would get over 110. Since my shop is a 3-car garage, that's a lot of heat! No wonder the inside of the shop kept getting so warm.

I bought those garage door insulation kits from a big box store like this https://mechanicguides.com/best-garage-door-insulation-kit/ (I think HD). That made a significant difference, but the doors were still a big radiator. Instead of the inside of the door registering 110 degrees, it would get up to the high 90s. That's a 10-15 degree drop, but my mini-split still struggled to take all that heat out of the shop.

A few months ago, I upgraded my garage doors to some of those R-18 super-insulated garage doors (with no windows). That has made an enormous difference. We haven't yet had any 90+ degree weather this year, but so far, the inside of my garage doors has stayed pretty close to the ambient temp in my shop. So, whatever heat the sun is putting onto the garage door's exterior is mostly not making its way into the shop.

People get fixated on seals. In some circumstances, bad seals can be the culprit. But keep in mind that the job of the seals is to keep the heat/cold in the AMBIENT air outside from getting inside. When you have a West-facing garage door and the sun is beating on your garage door in the afternoon, the ambient outside temperate is really not the problem. The problem is that the sun is super-heating the exterior surface of your garage door to a temperature that can be 20-30 degrees hotter than the outside air. That's a much bigger problem than bad seals. I'm not saying that seals don't matter; I am saying that getting as much insulation as possible on the surface of your garage door is much more critical than seals for controlling heat if you have a West-facing door and you want to keep your shop cool. At least, that has been my experience.

The thermal imaging camera also gave me some additional insights. I had extensive fluorescent lighting throughout the shop, and the camera showed just how much heat those were putting out. So, I changed to LED lighting. Enormous improvement.
Why does your profile say Canada but your post indicate you live in Socal?
 

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To install Reflective foil on Garage doors that reduce the radiant heat transfer an enclosed space. The smartest place to install reflective foil is in Garage Doors, wall or as sarking under the roof, as it reflects radiant heat away from the interior of the Garage in summer.

https://gryphongaragedoors.com

[/QUOTE]
 
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