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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
front crossmember/bumper mount

Passenger Side, Head On/Top









Driver Side, Head On/Top









Driver Rear Cross




Pass Rear Cross




Under Truck, Driver Side




Pass Side, Under Truck



This was done with a 110v Lincoln SP 135+ running .035 Radnor flux wire by NorCalPR. on the front edge, he filled in about 1/2" space between the body mount and crossmember, as for the inside, there wasnt much of the tabs from the old crossmember to use, and as for the bottom, he said he wasn't too good with overhead and wanted some opinions on his welding
 

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Do you see a flower icon on your camera? Yeah, select that function then take some pictures ;) I feel hammered when I look at your pictures.
 

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Looks don't mean shit in the real world. If you have doubts, mimic the position and material, weld it, cut it apart. Fused or it ain't, thats what matters... unless you got an x-ray, in which case, most welds that people think look good, really are shit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
shiftless89 said:

thanks asshole, and if anyone had answered the other thread, then i wouldnt have made its own thread.....


im glad you have no life that you can sit around on the computer all day and find reposts.... must be nice
 

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How can you say that as accurate?

Thats a pile of bullshit (about 70% pure).

I know for a fact (firsthand) that a good looking weld can be bad, did destructive testing in a welding class. My piece failed even though it appeared to be good. That was one time, and overhead filling a 1/2" v-groove with some structural wire. Basically, on some of the final passes the edges fused, but not the base in the center. Which makes perfect sense why it failed, I tried filling too much. But that was only one of ten or 11 that I did. The rest all passed. By your rational, 6/11 of my jobs should have failed when in reality was one. Thats flawed.
 

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They look decent, look fused nicely for the most part. Filling large gaps with wire isn't usually the best practice.

If you ask me, it looks that the thing that needs the most improvment is getting comfortable and steady.
 

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generalee7 said:
Do you see a flower icon on your camera? Yeah, select that function then take some pictures ;) I feel hammered when I look at your pictures.
I thought I was still hammered from last night.:p
 

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Not too bad for flux core. What you need to look for is good penetration :boobies: and a blue-ish band around the perimeter of the weld. This will indicate good temp and penetration. Try to avoid the spot weld approach, buzz, buzz, buzz. This only localizes the heat and doesn't give good metal flow. Practice makes perfect. good luck.
 

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IMO that is too small a welder to be welding on suspension components or frame components, as that machine just doesn't have the power to get sufficient penetration and fusion. Use a buzz box or a 175 (220) machine at least.

A good weld will look good, but a good looking weld will not always be a good weld.

:welder:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
how is it not strong enough? the metal of the frame is only 1/8" thick and the crossmember is only 3/16"
 

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how is it not strong enough? the metal of the frame is only 1/8" thick and the crossmember is only 3/16"
From the Lincoln website for a SP 135:
http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Catalog/equipmentdatasheet.asp?p=2515

"• Capabilities include welding 24 gauge through 3/16" mild steel with MIG and up to 5/16" with self-shielded flux-cored wire."

I actually own that machine and it is fine for sheet metal and welding up 1/8" plate but anything thicker, and especially if I'm welding on my truck I used my MM 251 as it definitely has enough power. You are better off in welding and will get a MUCH better weld if you scale down a big machine that max out a little one, especially if you are welding on a trail truck.

For an experienced welder, sure it is possible, but those are the maximum obtainable results with proper weld prep, welding horizontal, getting maximum HAZ and penetration and holding your mouth right. :D And then you have 1/2" gaps, you were not just welding horizontal, and the welds look less than par. Why use a welder that is minimally qualified to do the job?

Use what you want as it is your truck, but don't post up pictures of welding and not expect some opinion and criticism...as I do it for a living and as a hobby. :)

:welder:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i have this same thread on marlin, where several members have used a 90 amp harbor freight gasless mig on their trucks.. they arent professionals, and they use their trucks. they have gone through their welds and have reproted excellent success.....


norcal pr welded on his sliders, and said he has used them and they have not failed him yet.
 

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i have this same thread on marlin, where several members have used a 90 amp harbor freight gasless mig on their trucks.. they arent professionals, and they use their trucks. they have gone through their welds and have reproted excellent success.....


norcal pr welded on his sliders, and said he has used them and they have not failed him yet.
I used a Lincoln power supply with a Miller Wire feed, 220V. I can buzz through 1/2" plate if I wanted to!

I was a little sketch usin' the 115 as well. Like you stated, anything over than 1/8" and you are kinda pushin it.

Woulda used the 220v but to get that thing out at work it woulda taken a lot of huffin and puffin!
 

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Not too bad for flux core. What you need to look for is good penetration :boobies: and a blue-ish band around the perimeter of the weld. This will indicate good temp and penetration. Try to avoid the spot weld approach, buzz, buzz, buzz. This only localizes the heat and doesn't give good metal flow. Practice makes perfect. good luck.
Even a blueish band isn't enough. Just a spot weld will leave a blueish band around the weld.

The real way would to get two pieces of metal and weld them, then cut them down with a bandsaw. You can check the back of them, and you can "x-ray" the weld...

Jimbo, I think I have some extra 3/16 and 1/8" layin around. I'll weld it together, and cut it...

X2 on the practicin though. I could lay a decent bead about 6 months ago. Then when I was in work, I had to weld duct brackets for a month straight, then about another months work whenever I had time. All that time was good practice! :welder:
 

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The reason I said bluish band was because most folks don't want to take the time to cut up the welds. A spot weld will leave a blueish band because it has great penetration, as you typically only "spot weld" sheet metal together. I agree that when you are practicing your welding skills, cutting the weld apart is a great idea. I forget that most folks don't have the experience that some of us have. I guess the statement my drill sargeant used to say really rings true, "assumtion is the mother of all fuck ups". Good advice NorCal.:)
 

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Well, even with just a little surface weld, there will be blueish bands.

I just welded over some letters so I could grind them smooth. I had it on a low setting so there wouldn't be much heat introduced. It sure as hell didn't penetrate the 1/2" steel, but it sure did leave some blueish bands around it!

Just welded some plate together and cut it up. Turned out fine. Welded 1/8" steel and it was buzzing through the 1/8" steel no problem. The 3/16" was harder to buz through, but did show up on the opposite end. I had to run the bead moreover on the 3/16" side so not much weld is under the 1/8", but should be fine.

Pice in a few. I'm paintin the piece I had to weld over...
 

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Ok, here ya guys go:

1/8" on 3/16". Jimbo's crossmember and frame was stated to be thinner from grinding down so many times. I almost got the penetration with the 115 on that...



Looking at one end.


Back of 3/16" plate.


Cut up:

*Note that I could get the metal to lay flat because of welds underneath it. This is just some scrap I had layin around from when I first started layin beads.

3/16" plate over 1/8" plate:


Back of 1/8" plate:



Just fillin in that lettering:




Later,
Phill
 
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