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Discussion Starter #1
I have a nice full-sized spare on my truck, but I realize I don't have any way to actually change it out.

Can someone explain to me exactly what equipment I need to lift my truck up high enough that I can get a tire off on the trail? I'm guessing it would be a hi-lift jack and one of their various lifting accessories to hoist it from a rock slider or bumper, but I'm not 100% sure and don't want to spend cash on the wrong thing. What do you guys do?

Truck has ~3" lift kit, 33" tires, and Demello bolt-on sliders.

Thanks for your help!



 

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For price and size a hydralic bottle jack that you can pick up at almost any hardware store or auto supply will do the job. You might also need a block of wood or something to get the rear high enough but it can be put under the front knuckle alone to get the job done.
A 12 ton one should do the job for you for a good size and they don't cost that much. The little 6 tons are just to dimentionally small although they have the lift capacity.
Bottle jacks are much safer to use if done correctly than a HiLift which is very unstable.
The truck originally came with a little sizzor jack but they are very small and barely adequate to the task.


I have a nice full-sized spare on my truck, but I realize I don't have any way to actually change it out.

Can someone explain to me exactly what equipment I need to lift my truck up high enough that I can get a tire off on the trail? I'm guessing it would be a hi-lift jack and one of their various lifting accessories to hoist it from a rock slider or bumper, but I'm not 100% sure and don't want to spend cash on the wrong thing. What do you guys do?

Truck has ~3" lift kit, 33" tires, and Demello bolt-on sliders.

Thanks for your help!



 

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Discussion Starter #4
A good compact floor jack is your best option if you have the space in the truck.
For price and size ... 12 ton ... hydralic bottle jack
Thanks guys. Most floor and bottle jacks aren't tall enough to get the wheels off the ground without having to shim it up with a bunch of wood, so I am a little reluctant. I suppose I could put the jack and a few blocks of wood in my recovery kit though.

Also if I'm on uneven or rocky ground, it might be challenging to set it up on a sturdy surface. That's why a hi-lift seems most appealing, plus I understand they can also be used for other recovery scenarios, and I see them on most every off-road rig. So it seems like a hi-lift gets more bang for the buck, but maybe it's all marketing hype? I haven't done any serious wheeling yet so I defer to the pros here!

Some backstory - I'm just getting into wheeling and am putting together a set of recovery gear so I can ride along with my local club without being a detriment, and being able to change a flat is my first order of business. :)

Anyway thanks for the great input!
 

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Hi-lift jacks are great, but you still have to be careful when using the sliders as jack points. The upper part of the jack has been known to dent the door, or side panel, if not done right. No matter what type of jack you use, you still need get the rig on fairly level ground and then stabilize the vehicle with tire chocks or rocks.
 

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The stock bottle jack will do the job. A hi-lift and sliders is an easier method though.
 
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