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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been collecting parts, tools, etc. for the trail to hopefully anticipate most of the problems that can occur out there. (I know it's not possible to be ready for everything, but the more prepared the better) . . .

Anyhow, one thing I was wondering about is what to do if the battery or alternator dies?

I already have one of those portable battery jump start units. (I have an automatic tranny so I can't jump it by pushing it and dropping the clutch.). . .

But I'm wondering what would be done if if the alternator is gone. The truck won't stay running. Then what? . . .
 

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spare alternator. Or spare parts to fix an alternator.

Edit: I'm thinking if you stay out of the mud, chances are your alternator isn't just gonna die, so stay out of the mud as much as possible. When I was a newb and liked the mud, I filled the alternator with mud, banged on it (broke a chunk of the casing off--ooops, too hard), got some of the mud loose, got me close to home, but ended up calling my buddy to pick me up with the rollback. Lesson learned....FUCK mud.

--Scott
 

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If the alternator dies you can still run the truck. Turn off all accessories and try to stay light on the throttle. Eventually, the battery will drain but you should have enough time to get off the trail. In the event that you don't make it to the end of the trail, simply swap your battery for a friend's. While you are using his freshly charged battery, your dead battery will be recharging in his truck.

In the event that your battery dies, you can actually still run the truck as it will be powered by the alternator. You could actually even run the truck with the battery completely disconnected. While this isn't recommended as it ads considerable stress on the alternator, it will power the truck.
 

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I would recommend taking your alternator out and having it totally cleaned and checked (brushes especially).

Learn how to check the brushes in the alternator - where they are and how to replace them.

In most cases (that I've seen) - alternator failure is due to worn or dirty brushes and worn/dirty contacts (wiring,etc).

If its jam packed full of dirt, it won't work either - and that's why I suggest having it totally cleaned to begin with. If you're diving in mud holes once in a while - you're probably OK. If you're immersing your truck in mud holes - your alternator could be caked full.

I ran my 96 in & around a lot of mud for years and never had problems. However - as preventative maintenance - I removed it, had it cleaned (professsionally sandblasted) and the bearings replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the great info, guys. . . .

There's not too much mud around my parts so fortunately I don't really have to worry about that. . . . . But I'll keep it mind if I ever do go mudding. . . .

So it sounds like as long as I have a buddy with me who's willing to swap batteries back and forth, then I should be ok. . . . .That's good to know.
 

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Actually the alternator rebuild is easy and requires about $20 worth of parts.

First thing, as said earlier, it's usually due to mud. If it's packed, rinse it with water as you tap and manually turn it every so often.

Usually, that will do the trick- it will take a lot of water, so if you're out in a situation where you carry your own water supply, you should consider rebuilding it. It'll be a lot easier one on everyone than playing the revolving battery game.

Here's some good info ;): http://www.tacomaterritory.com/wiki/index.php/Alternator_Rebuild
 
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