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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
1. Jack and support the vehicle with stands.

2. Remove tires, place under frame as a safety measure.

3. Remove two bolts on caliper, remove caliper from rotor, and use a bungee cord to support the caliper.

4. If needed use a rubber mallet to tap rotor off studs.

5. Clean new rotor with brake cleaner, clean locating face on spindle, and put new rotor in place.

6. On caliper, remove wire retaining clip from cross pins.

7. Depress ends of pin retainer, remove pins.

8. Remove old pads (note: brake pad w/ wear indicator is to inside of caliper)

9. Use a C clamp to carefully compress caliper pistons. (open bleeder valve to avoid pushing fluid backwards thru the ABS system - Thanks NJtaco for the tip)

10. Remove backing plates from old pads.

11. Add anti-squeel pads to new pads, add old backing plates to new pads.

12. Install new pads, reassemble caliper.

13. Install caliper.

14. Clean rotor with brake parts cleaner.

15. Rotate rotor to check for interferance.

16. Install tire, torque lug nuts.

Repeat on opposite side.

Breaking in new rotors and pads:

Make 6 stops from 60 to 10 MPH - do not come to a complete stop. Make 2 stops from 80 to 10 MPH, again, do not come to a complete stop. At this point, stock rotors and pads will be extremely hot and may be smoking - again, do not come to a complete stop to avoid imprinting pad material on rotors. Also, the pedal may have faded considerably - don't be concerned, that's normal. Drive for another 15 to 20 minutes to allow the rotors to cool.

Cost for NAPA rotors and pads (the best grade NAPA has) was $121.00, plus $2.99 for brake parts cleaner. It was cheaper to put on new rotors and pads than it was to have the rotors turned and new pads installed at a shop by over $100.00. It took about 90 minutes to complete the job at a very leisurely pace.

Mark
 

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Good write up.



But on a side note sometimes you can find places that will turn your rotors for cheap if you take them the rotors off the vehicle. I know my high school would do it for free at our auto classes.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
yup, most NAPA or other good parts stores can turn rotors for about 20 bucks.

In this case I had some hard spots in the rotors that turning didn't cure- they caused the truck to shudder while stopping.
 

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crawler#976 said:
9. Use a C clamp to carefully compress caliper pistons.

and...

It took about 90 minutes to complete the job at a very leisurely pace.

Mark

It's been awhile, but I don't recall having to use a c clamp to compress the pistons. Careful use of a flathead did the trick. Maybe I just didn't have any fluid in the lines... :rolleyes:

Couldn't agree more about the leisurely pace. This is a relaxing project to do in the spring/summer under a shade tree. Quite straightforward.

Thx for the nice write up.
 

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A couple of things I would add. I live in the rust belt so...

1. Hit the rotors with a coat of good temperature resistant paint after cleaning them. Do this the day before. Then clean the braking surface with thinner.

2. Lots of Anti-seize on the hub face before installing the rotor. This will make the future of brake jobs a lot easier.

3. NAPA's ceramic pads and these trucks get along very well. A little more but well worth it.

If your brakes are working properly (correct pad material etc.) you will not be able to turn your rotors because they will also be worn. They probably also will not shake because any potential pad build-up would have been worn off.

I can't say enough about buying the right components. Brake pads are not just brake pads.
 

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Good write up! Pics of each step would be nice, then it would be a real write up :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks to NJtaco for bring up this - my brakes are non-ABS, so compressing them with a clamp avoids bleeding the system:

Just a suggestion, to please don't take as critisicm...

When compressing your calipers, do so with the bleeders OPEN. This prevents fluid from being forced backwards through the ABS system, if there is one. If the tech is in the habit of doing this, this step won't be forgotten on ABS equipped trucks. Some ABS units can be damaged by forcing too much fluid back through, especially if it is contaminated.

My 2C, worth what you paid...

And thanks for the writeup... it should help a lot of people.
 
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