TTORA Forum banner

81 - 100 of 102 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Cut and pasted from the Overland Journal website-

What is Overlanding?
History, wildlife, culture, scenery, self-sufficiency - these are the rewards of overlanding.

Overlanding describes self-reliant adventure travel to remote destinations where the journey is the primary goal. Typically, but not exclusively, accommodated by mechanized off-highway capable transport (from bicycles to trucks) where the principal form of lodging is camping; often lasting for extended lengths of time (months to years) and often spanning international boundaries. While expedition is defined as a journey with a purpose, overlanding sees the journey as the purpose.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Car Camping
Traveling in a vehicle to an established campground. If there is a picnic table there, it is probably car camping.
Back Country Adventure
A one-day or multi-day off-highway trip on an adventure motorcycle or in a 4WD vehicle.
Overland(ing)
Vehicle-supported, self-reliant adventure travel, typically exploring remote locations and interacting with other cultures.
Vehicle-Dependent Expedition
An organized, vehicle-dependent journey with a defined purpose, often geographic or scientific in nature.
Expedition Vehicle
A 4WD vehicle or adventure motorcycle prepared for self-reliant travel over long distances, through unpredictable weather and over variable terrain.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Technical terrain can be encountered throughout the journey, and the travelers may even seek out the most challenging route to a destination as part of their experience, but overland travel is not the same as recreational "fourwheeling", where the primary objective is overcoming challenging obstacles. The critical point to the term overland travel is that the purpose is to include at least two or more of the following: 1. Remote locations, 2. Cultures other than your own, 3. Under-explored or under-documented regions, 4. Self-reliance in unfamiliar territories for multiple days, weeks or months. That is to say, an overnight trip to the local mountains on a well-documented route, staying in an established campground with full-hookups, is not an overland adventure, it is a backcountry trip or at the very least, car camping.

Primary purpose: Exploration and adventure travel
Duration: Typically a week to many years. Can be only a few days if the route is particularly remote, challenging, or infrequently traveled.
Logistics: Detailed planning is required for environmental, geographic, and geopolitical contingencies.
Route Finding: Navigation is easy, typically on known routes that are well documented
Camping: Remote or established campgrounds
International Borders: Rarely includes crossing of international borders
Risk: Low risk to personnel, moderate risk to equipment on more challenging tracks.
Terrain: Backcountry travel often includes challenging trails as part of the adventure, with trails like the Dusy Ershim and longer routes in Moab, Utah being an example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
been an observer for a while but more active on ExPo. it is funny to think of overlanding as interacting with different cultures. if you think about it even a trip from northern cali to AZ is seeing a different culture. a trip to florida is really different. The U.S. while a nation is very different state to state. having been in Florida a few times I can honestly tell you my inlaws are different from the people here in Northern California not to mention the difference in landscape across the board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
if having your National Forest campsite invaded at 3:00AM by intoxicated locals is considered "interacting with different cultures" ; then I've been Overlanding! I thought I was just a Car Camper/Back Country Adventure type!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
if having your National Forest campsite invaded at 3:00AM by intoxicated locals is considered "interacting with different cultures" ; then I've been Overlanding! I thought I was just a Car Camper/Back Country Adventure type!
hahaha thats pretty funny. Overlanders don't need no NF campsite.

but really trying to determine what is expo, overland, etc is a little hard to do. what i consider overland and what someone else does is totally different. because of the big hype anymore about expo and overland the idea behind it has been construed over and over not to mention the cost of "necessary" equipment. a small tent that sits on your roof costs more than many make in a month. an itty bitty 12v refrigerator costs double what my 18cuft house hold refer just cost me. To me thats just ridiculous. so only rich people can be expo or overland? I bet I spend double or even triple the time outdoors than most. last year my wife and I made a grand total of $32,000 combined. In my mind the true overlanders are the guys and gals that find a way to experience the outdoors. spend a little extra time making their own mods to be able to be out for 2-3 weeks at a time safely. sorry i am not going to go out and spend my life savings on overpriced prefabbed parts just to make someone else rich. yeah there are some parts that you can't make. air lockers, engine parts, even refers, but why do i have to have what 1 or 2 specific guys sell just to be cool. IMO most of the overland community has gotten way off the focus of being an overland outdoorsmen. now it is about the coolest gadgets instead of the journey and the great experiences you have.

sorry rant off
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
WTF is that! I wouldn't want to stop that thing from going over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Last winter, December to March, I did 15,000 miles in my 04 dc S/C Taco. From Wyoming to Panama and back with Baja tossed in. I spent about 15 days of that in hotels and the rest was camping.

A bunch of people said don't do that trip in a supercharged truck! You will destroy your engine! You can't get super unleaded in much of Baja let alone in Central America!

I am here to say web wheelers are full of shit! Not once in that 15k miles through all of Mexico and all of the Central American countries was I sol on 91 or better fuel.

My point is who give a shiat what everyone else says about your truck, your use of the truck and what you should or should not do. What is the best way to find something out....do it yourself! Forums are great and useful and all that jazz but at some point they are just that, a place to exchange info and or opinions. I think the word expedition is a bit cheesy, trendy and overused. Kind of like the word eco.

Now with that out of the way.....here is what I found really nice to have on my "road trip", notice I call it road trip not expedition.

-20gal aux fuel tank. Not required at all but was nice to not have to stop for 400-500 miles for fuel. I never saw more than about 300 miles between fuel stations and that was really rare. I only once saw a town that had no premium unleaded and that was in Baja.

-small but very complete tool kit. Never had any major breakdowns but often was using the tools in my bag.

-high lift jack, not needed a ton but when I needed it I really needed it! I had some air bag problems so when I needed to work on them this really made it a snap.

-a few key books and maps. No GPS needed to do 15k miles to Panama City and back! The books more than anything helped me find places to camp since I was not into staying in high dollar hotels.

-iPod, I need my music!

-camera, no other way for me to revisit all the places I went once back here at home.

-1st aid kit, only used it a few times but was glad I had it.

-A good briefcase type folder system for documents. Very important not to lose your docs and having a place plus good organized system was key for me.

-MSR water bags, my favorite way to use water at camp. Buy the 5gal water jugs anywhere, exchange the jugs, fill up the MSR bags. Use it for all drinking, brushing teeth, ect ect ect.

-a good sleeping pad. I use Thermarests. Of course a good sleeping bag or two. Once in thr tropics I only needed a silk bag liner to sleep.

-a good stove & cook set. I had a grill with me but it was not needed.

-a tent. Once well into CA it was to hot to sleep in the back of my truck.

-an orange safety triangle and fire extingusher. They will use this to rob you (the cops) in many parts of Latin America!

-porta-crapper, few times it was just about required to have! Most of the time not needed but at leats a couple of weeks I was glad I had it.

-Chiltons manual for my truck, My throttle body went out on the trip and it was nice to have the manual not so much to fix it but to trouble shoot the problem. I could have did without it but it was very useful.

-steering wheel lock. I used it always.




Now here is the things I was glad I had but were not required....

-Engel 45L, yup having cold beers 24/7 is high on my list! It was nice to have snacks and other cold beverages at all times too.

-surfboard, kayak, spear gun, fishing pole, ect. Good to have ways to entertain yourself.

-water tank, I have a 20gal in my truck. After Baja it really was not needed much. Just a luxery item. Difficult to fill with clean water once south of the border. Even with a filter on it I didn't feel comfortable drinking from the tank once I had questionable water in it.

-solar shower, nice to have but not required.

-awning, only used it a few times for shade. Not really needed in the dry season down south.

-books, I had to many and didn't find myself reading as much as I though I would.

-power inverter & duel batteries, not required but nice to have. Allowed me to charge camera batteries and such while driving or at camp. Really needed the 2nd battery for the fridge.

-air compressor, with air bags I would have been screwed had I not had one. If I had no air bags problems it was not needed. I never had a flat and only aired down once in Baja.

-personal safety items. Big can of bear spray, variety of knives, fishing gaft, club, spear gun! None needed to fend of machete wielding drunkards but they did give me piece of mind if it came to that.




As far as a truck and what I think it needs for this kind of trip....

-good brakes. I left with brand new pads and turned rotors/drums and 15k miles later my fronts were toasted! Since the trip I have upgraded the fronts to Tundra brakes.

-good working A/C. :rolleyes:

-good suspension. My front is all good with Icon/Total Chaos but I have a Deaver 8-pack in the rear with Air Lift air bags. It is not cutting it for the weight. Currently working on sorting out the rear.

-good steering parts. Roads can be brutal down south so having tight steering is a must. I wore out one tie rod on the trip.

-on a "mini" truck like the Tacoma it is best to strengthen up the frame. Frame plates and a buffed up rear x-member has worked for me. I wouldn't mind more buffing of the frame in the rear though, as most people know it is a weak point on the Tacos.

-a good working tranny and or clutch. My truck is an auto and it didn't let me down on the trip. Although I did service it a few times and do have an aftermarket trans cooler. A clutch is going to take a beating so you want that in good order.

-wheel bearings. I replaced all mine before the trip and they gave me no problems.

-cooling system. All I did was replace the fan clutch & thermostat before I left for piece of mind. I did carry a spare thermostat though. Once in the tropics I went with a 30/70 water to coolant instead of the 70/30 I run here at home. My truck was thankful I did that.

-starter, battery and alt. You need these in top working order for the obvious reasons.



That is about it really, anything else not worth listing because they are items everybody takes on a trip or are just not needed.

my 2cents on "expedition" travel south of the border....I am heading back to Panama in a few months via my 04 Taco. There is not much I plan to change from last years trip.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
146 Posts
Nice of Shannon to add this section. But exactly 'what' makes a rig an expedition vehicle?

If we look at the definition of 'Expedition' (according to Mirriam-Webster)



I'm sure we all can agree on 1a; a journey or excursion undertaken for a specific purpose for the purpose of this discussion...

A purpose-built expedition vehicle should have:

1. Ability to carry more fuel than originally delivered from the dealer. Auxiliary fuel, be it an extended range fuel tank or on-board external fuel cans.
2. Self-sufficient - i.e. carries the basic needs of the occupants (along with basic vehicle repair items)
3. Extended range communication equipment
4. ???

What say you?
I am going a different route with my build.

I call mine BOTT or Bug Out Tactical Truck.

Just like a Marine MTVR, it can go almost anywhere but it has to carry weight off-road likewise.

Water, food and fuel are the top 3 items the U.S. military carries into battle in that order then the rest follows.

I actually define my mission profile for my BOTT:

The strategic aim of the BOTT is the ability to bug out any time and in any weather conditions. Bugging out can be from man-made situations like society collapse, anarchy, chaos, hazardous chemical spills or natural from severe weather, earthquakes, fires or even CME's and solar storms or basically the power shuts off and will not come back on for more than 6 months or so.

I plan for a greater than 95% ready rate and always have my BOTT ready like a fireman's truck. I actually do severe weather spotting for the National Weather Service in my area so I am used to being mobile in severe weather, especially at night traveling the back roads to report in. I have encountered large trees and branches on the roads, flash floods and high winds and the BOTT has to be built for extreme weather conditions as well as winter conditions and snow drifts.

So the strategic aim is not only the ability to travel through most conditions but to do that and still carry weight in the bed. And not just some gear for a trail ride or camping trip as with a tactical situation but strategic survival gear. The top 3 items the U.S. military carries into battle are: water, food and fuel in that order then comes the ammo, hygiene and other stuff.

I work for a major meduim and heavy tactical truck maker for the U.S. Army and U.S. Marines and especially with Marine trucks, they not only have to perform off-road, they have to do that and carry heavy payloads. I am a Marine veteran myself.

So naturally the Tacoma fits the bill. Not to small like a Jeep type where they run great off-road but lack payload and cargo capacity yet not too big like a full-size where their weight means additional ground clearance will be needed to not sink as much, etc... and they need big engines to get them moving.

The goal is to bug out with solid intelligence and avoid FEMA camps, Homeland Security installations, etc... basically the hand-me-out camps. I would rather find my own route and survive on my own rather than wait for the feds to help me.

Tactically speaking, the BOTT will be one bad-***** off-roader when done, fit for local trail rides and some cross-country adventures realizing it can still fullfill its strategic mission profile.

More to come...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
^^^^Are you building something like this???:D

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,360 Posts
That was my first thought on seeing it as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
146 Posts
While the Hilux looks impressive, where are the spare tires, where is the water, food and fuel suppose to be stored? Where is the survival gear going to be placed?

Maybe this should be the lead truck in a convoy but if it cannot carry water, food or fuel and other supplies, it will not last long out there regardless of the weapons or armor...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
It was a joke bud...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
81 - 100 of 102 Posts
Top