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So tonight we built that truss for the Idler arm and i was really exited to weld it. I have never been told whats right and wrong and kinda learned it on my own by doing the widebody on my corrado. It was a 110 mig no gas. Well i got a gas set up for my welder and Bart has been welding all kinds of stuff and i havent used it. Dont get me wrong im not bitching cause from what i can see of the welds they are clean. He did the Idler arm truss and it looks good. Kirk jumped in tonight and told me he would weld the bar and he lives in north dever so my choices were drive the truck down there to have him weld 2 plates on or fill another bottle and do it.

I thought i would just lay some beads on a piece of 1/8inch scrap. First i didnt know where to set the regulator and guessed. I played with it and got it right as far as i can tell but what do i know. I threw down 2 beads and went to town with the hammer. Nothing broke off or moved. I compared it to barts beads and mine were built up more but the marking on his was directly under the bead and not all that visable. Mine on the other hand were visible and the markings went out about 1/8inch. I started welding things to the scrap and just pounding on it and couldnt get a piece to brake off with my BFH.

Im going to snap some pics later today to show you guys and see what you say but what i wanna know is what makes a strong weld. I always have been told a good weld looks like you knocked over a stack of quarters. Mine really doesnt look that great its flat and you cant really see the strokes as well. Just looking at it id say my welds went deeper but were not as tight as Barts but it looked ok.

Post pics if you can for an example of what your sayin and remember im new to this and dont know all the welder talk i hear everyone sayin.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I snapped a pic of each weld This was barts warm up weld before the truss. The ones on the truss look better IMO. He has a really clean orginized weld and it looks the same all the way down.. But this is what i was going off of cause it was visable.
Its the farthest to the left(not the little dot but the short bead) its a short weld but you can see what im looking at.


The other was me trying to figure out what i was doing and forgetting the gas works lol.

heres what i got once i got the gas on and was welding pieces to pound on.


I felt like it was pretty good but if its not feel free to correct me cause i want to learn and wont be offended it if im not doing it right.
 

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Doesn't look half bad from what I can tell!

Only thing that confuses me is the bits of oxidation that appear between each "quarter" if you will... I've never seen that -- Maybe someone will chime in and throw some ideas out.

Did you cool it with water and let it sit?
 

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First and foremost, I'm not a professional welder :D Take my opinion with a grain of salt if you would like :D

I'd say turn up the voltage. The technique looks good but it needs more heat. See the discolored heat marks on the metal. Those should be farther away from the metal, especially on 1/8 stock. The welds look built up too much. With higher heat, those welds would penetrate the two pieces you're welding better.

Here's a couple of my welds on my hydro assist bracket. The tubing is 1/8 wall and the tabs are 3/16. The bracket where the hydro ram attaches is 1/4.


(Forget the one booger tack weld on the left ring :lmao:)

There isn't much weld sticking up. Also, after I welded it, the heat marks were 1/2 up that 2" tab (3/16" thick) and well over an inch away on the tube.

Here's a side shot of the same bracket. You can also see the weld holding on the 1/4" thick bracket on the back.


These weld were done with a 220 Miller. I personally like to weld hot. One a 110 machine, turn up and try welding some scrap.
 

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Doesn't look half bad from what I can tell!

Only thing that confuses me is the bits of oxidation that appear between each "quarter" if you will... I've never seen that -- Maybe someone will chime in and throw some ideas out.

Did you cool it with water and let it sit?
My welds do that as well. I believe it's the coating on the outside of the wire, not oxidation.
 

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I agree with Volcom's assesment, but it's hard to tell from pictures. IMHO, the best way to determine if you had sufficient penetration is to look at the backside.

Did you bevel the piece you welded on at all? That will help too...
 

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I started my 4Runner project with a Hobart 135 on gas (110 machine). Then my dad bought over his new Miller (220) and I can't believe how much better my welds are with the 220 over the 110. I learned with the 110, always keep the voltage turned up. Like TC said, if can, bevel your welding edges (very key with thicker stuff like 3/16 and 1/4).

The best thing you can do though is practice and keep welding :welder: :welder: :welder: :welder: :welder: :welder: :welder:
 

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vw there are really three types of welds:

1st is the drag forward, stopping and go back into the puddle the forward and repeat.

2nd is the circle weld were you work in a circular pattern as you go down the seam without stopping i.e. going away from the puddle and circling around going back in and then back out.

3rd is working in a C-type pattern down the length of the weld

The 3rd weld is your strongest weld ( 2nd would be your 2nd strongest) because it doesn't involve contaminating the weld by going back into the already made puddle. As said above you need to bring your power level up as high as the metals will allow without burning through. if I have time tomorrow I will show you what I mean by the types of welds.

I hope this will help
 

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I snapped a pic of each weld
not to shabby, looks good but lots of splatter. -dirty material?

Like TC said, if can, bevel your welding edges (very key with thicker stuff like 3/16 and 1/4).
Frankly in my opinion those 110 Welders are only good for thinner sheet metal not any kind of bar stock. For you heavier stuff I'd look at a 220v mig or stick machine. I like Miller the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
not to shabby, looks good but lots of splatter. -dirty material?


Frankly in my opinion those 110 Welders are only good for thinner sheet metal not any kind of bar stock. For you heavier stuff I'd look at a 220v mig or stick machine. I like Miller the best.
The splatter is from me not having the gas right or off all together. It was scrap so yeah it has some surface rust in spots and had been on the garage floor all night in the oil and nasty crap. I just wiped it off and went to town.

I have a miller 110 with gas so i dont plan on doing anything more then 1/8 with it.
 
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