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Discussion Starter #1
Did a search and found some good info but nothing that solves my problem or answers my question. Does anyone make rotors and brakes that will solve my problem?? I drive over mountains every time I leave my house, in fact I live on top of one,Lol. Using your brakes on these mountains and curves is a constant way of life so replacing brakes once a year or so is normal around here.
The real problem for me is that I spend alot of time off road on logging trails and old mining roads and drive through many streams or rivers in a days time. Some of the roads are river beds and driving in the river in 1 to 1.5' of water for a ways is not unusual.
To make a faster point here, my brakes are constantly getting hot and then dipped in cold water and that warps the rotors in short order. Is there any rotors on the market that will last longer under these conditions?
Thanks for any info you may have to share, Mike
 

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might look into rotors that are cryogenically frozen.... however cycling any hot metal liek that is going to kill it, the fix, avoid it....
 

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Not sure if your year has them stock or not? But it sounds like you definately are in need of some slotted/drilled rotors? Basically that kind of rotor will have slots machined into them and holes drilled through out them. This will help eliminate a lot of the heat that causes you to warp your rotors in such a short time.

You may even need to upgrade to bigger rotors that are slotted and drilled? usually people only do that if there adding more horsepower, weight, or larger tires? Just my :2cents:

Try using that Magic Search button and you should find something on what brand of rotors and pads are best and maybe even a thread or write up on a brake upgrade? Good luck, you may want to take your truck out of Over Drive (that is if the Auto's come with a OD option?).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
99ARTaco said:
Not sure if your year has them stock or not? But it sounds like you definately are in need of some slotted/drilled rotors? Basically that kind of rotor will have slots machined into them and holes drilled through out them. This will help eliminate a lot of the heat that causes you to warp your rotors in such a short time.

You may even need to upgrade to bigger rotors that are slotted and drilled? usually people only do that if there adding more horsepower, weight, or larger tires? Just my :2cents:

Try using that Magic Search button and you should find something on what brand of rotors and pads are best and maybe even a thread or write up on a brake upgrade? Good luck, you may want to take your truck out of Over Drive (that is if the Auto's come with a OD option?).
Yes, I have the OD option and take it out of OD all the time but it doesn't help to slow me down a whole lot on these mountains.Also have the EC button and 4-W drive.
They do make the slotted rotors for my 01 Tacoma but I didn't know if they would help in this situation much, that's what I was really asking.
Avoiding the mountains is hard to do when you live in the middle of them and giving them up is not an option I want to face,Lol. Also driving through water in the mining territory of WV is not an avoidable option either when your hunting or photographing Bear.
Thanks for the info guy's. I'm going to check on Ceramic pads too. Mike
 

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I cant see how you are dipping hot rotors in a stream unless you are bajaing through the woods, or going straight from the road to the stream. Simple fix is obviously to let them cool first. If you are warping rotors due to this I would also be concerned about cracking a block. I know not the answer you were looking for. Maybe invest in a brake lathe machine. :rolleyes:
 

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Mike-in-WV said:
Yes, I have the OD option and take it out of OD all the time but it doesn't help to slow me down a whole lot on these mountains.Also have the EC button and 4-W drive.
They do make the slotted rotors for my 01 Tacoma but I didn't know if they would help in this situation much, that's what I was really asking.
Avoiding the mountains is hard to do when you live in the middle of them and giving them up is not an option I want to face,Lol. Also driving through water in the mining territory of WV is not an avoidable option either when your hunting or photographing Bear.
Thanks for the info guy's. I'm going to check on Ceramic pads too. Mike
Yeah i would look into the slotted rotors for sure. Maybe even just start there first and see if the stock sized slotted/drilled rotors fix you up? This should help with your water problem as well since the slotted rotors will over all be cooler, making your chances of warping less when bombing through the mining area's :D :D

Then if that doesn't work consider going to a larger rotor and caliper then stock. A larger rotor/caliper will give you more of an area to spread the heat from the constant use.

Plus that upgrade would increase your interval between changing the pads.

If you're any good with a camera and have any sweet nature pics, especially of some bears that you would be willing to share. Shot me an e-mail, I need to get some pics framed and hung in the office. You know the ones that take you out of the office for a few brief seconds to clear your mind. :D :D
 

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LC engineering sells drilled and slotted rotors for our trucks......they are not bad priced and when paired with ceramic pads they stop really well........I don't know how much they would really help but if you are replacing parts onse a year anyhow you might as well give them a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
shovelracer said:
I cant see how you are dipping hot rotors in a stream unless you are bajaing through the woods, or going straight from the road to the stream. Simple fix is obviously to let them cool first. If you are warping rotors due to this I would also be concerned about cracking a block. I know not the answer you were looking for. Maybe invest in a brake lathe machine. :rolleyes:
I'm sorry but I don't understand your comment????? You don't need to Ba-ja around here to dip your rotors in water.Maybe I didn't explain it very well in my original post....There are several areas where I drive in the old strip mines on old mining and logging roads where you will drive through or in a creek or stream maybe 20 times in a 2 mile stretch and that's after driving over and up and down 15-20 miles of mountains just to get to the valley or strip mine area. The water and or stream is deeper than half way up my wheels....so how do you figure I have to be going fast or Ba-jaing to get my rotors wet??? Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the ideas and comments guy's. I'm going to check in to digger rotors and slotted.
We have alot of what we call Bear runners around here (Guy's who chase Bear with dogs) and most of theml drive Tacomas and they all have the same problem, Water, mud, rocks and mountains. Hard on the brakes ! Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #11
99ARTaco said:
Yeah i would look into the slotted rotors for sure. Maybe even just start there first and see if the stock sized slotted/drilled rotors fix you up? This should help with your water problem as well since the slotted rotors will over all be cooler, making your chances of warping less when bombing through the mining area's :D :D

Then if that doesn't work consider going to a larger rotor and caliper then stock. A larger rotor/caliper will give you more of an area to spread the heat from the constant use.

Plus that upgrade would increase your interval between changing the pads.

If you're any good with a camera and have any sweet nature pics, especially of some bears that you would be willing to share. Shot me an e-mail, I need to get some pics framed and hung in the office. You know the ones that take you out of the office for a few brief seconds to clear your mind. :D :D
There is over 500 pictures of Bear in my collection over the past 7 years of photographing them and here are a few. Check out the male standing up , He makes me jealous,Lol. Mike
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v81/Beartracker/
 

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Mike-in-WV said:
I'm sorry but I don't understand your comment????? You don't need to Ba-ja around here to dip your rotors in water.Maybe I didn't explain it very well in my original post....There are several areas where I drive in the old strip mines on old mining and logging roads where you will drive through or in a creek or stream maybe 20 times in a 2 mile stretch and that's after driving over and up and down 15-20 miles of mountains just to get to the valley or strip mine area. The water and or stream is deeper than half way up my wheels....so how do you figure I have to be going fast or Ba-jaing to get my rotors wet??? Mike
Dude, can you read? Key word 'hot' in hot rotors. Anyone can dip a rotor in a stream it doesnt matter whether its once or 20 times on a trip. But you are going to need to be going fast to get them hot on or off road. Your problem is obvious, you need to stop for a few minutes and let them cool down before crossing the first stream, but like most people around hear you want a magical fix instead of doing the right thing. The answer is obviously to chill out for a few minutes and let them cool down before proceeding. If you are having problems now, then spending extra money on drilled or slotted isnt the answer. It should be clear to you that these are not as strong and are prone to cracking. Not worth the 20 degrees it will lower you rotor temps. If anything you need stronger rotors like the Tundra conversion.
 

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I would say the slotted or cross drilled rotors will help to some extent, as others said overall they will stay cooler. I am not sure there is anyway to solve the issue completely, but perhaps you could get a bit more life out of them. I love the guy from NJ w/ his easy fix of letting them cool, some people just don't understand what it means to live in the Mts. :rolleyes:
 

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Taking the tranny out of OD is just about useless when you're trying to slow down; you really need to down-shift to 2 or even L (when you're going less than 30). Try to let the engine slow you down. Ceramic pads are really not the best trick. I had them on my Silverado and when I was pulling tree equipment around it was a bad scene. They heat up so fast--I know, they're supposed to--but then the fade was horrendous and it took forever for them to cool down. I couldn't even touch the rim of the wheel for 10 minutes! If you haul any kind of load, I would avoid ceramic pads. I really like the Tundra conversion too. Might be worth your while since you're replacing rotors and pads frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
shovelracer said:
Dude, can you read? Key word 'hot' in hot rotors. Anyone can dip a rotor in a stream it doesnt matter whether its once or 20 times on a trip. But you are going to need to be going fast to get them hot on or off road. Your problem is obvious, you need to stop for a few minutes and let them cool down before crossing the first stream, but like most people around hear you want a magical fix instead of doing the right thing. The answer is obviously to chill out for a few minutes and let them cool down before proceeding. If you are having problems now, then spending extra money on drilled or slotted isnt the answer. It should be clear to you that these are not as strong and are prone to cracking. Not worth the 20 degrees it will lower you rotor temps. If anything you need stronger rotors like the Tundra conversion.
Sarcastic and dumb too! What a combination. The brakes don't get hot from going to fast... you should have read my orignal post before making smart ass comments. They get hot because of going down mountain roads and hair pin curves for many miles. You would have to drive these roads before you would understand . I have been driving 4 wheel drives for over 45 years so a lesson in how to drive is not something I need from some punk ass hole DUDE!
 

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Like someone else mentioned in this thread, this sounds like an interesting upgrade (Tundra brake upgrade):

http://www.ttora.com/forum/showthread.php?t=51597

I know the fullsize domestic crowd (F150's upgrading to F250 and F350 brakes) has been doing this for years.

As for cross-drilled rotors, I have no experience with them, but I thought this blurb was interesting from Wilwood's (a known brake parts manufacturer) website:

(http://www.wilwood.com/Centers/Information/Pages/faqs.asp#question7):

"Q: Why are some rotors drilled or slotted?
A: Rotors are drilled to reduce rotating weight, an issue near and dear to racers searching for ways to minimize unsprung weight. Drilling diminishes a rotor's durability and cooling capacity.

Slots or grooves in rotor faces are partly a carryover from the days of asbestos pads. Asbestos and other organic pads were prone to "glazing" and the slots tended to help "scrape or de-glaze" them. Drilling and slotting rotors has become popular in street applications for their pure aesthetic value. Wilwood has a large selection of drilled and slotted rotors for a wide range of applications."

Almost sounds as if they're saying cross drilled rotors are more for looks nowadays (aesthetics) since today's pads are no longer as prone to "glazing", but I really don't know. Also found it interesting that they say "drilling diminishes durability and cooling capacity." I have no personal experience with cross drilled rotors, so I don't know. Only other thing I've heard about them, though, is that mud and teeny pebbles sometimes get stuck in the holes when off-roading.

As for slotted rotors, I have no personal experience with them, either. I do know that I've seen pics of the desert racing trucks with slotted rotors and solid ones, but don't remember seeing too many with drilled rotors. My guess is that it would probably be harder for mud or tiny pebbles getting stuck in the slotted indentations of a rotor than in the holes of a cross drilled rotor, though.

And yeah, I agree that going up and down mountain inclines heats up the brakes really fast, and even more so the slower you go. I'll admit, I don't have much mountain driving experience, but I know that the reason why mountain passes have so many 18-wheeler gravel ramps on the downslopes is due to the high propensity of them heating up and fading with that kind of driving.
 

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Many times rotors will warp from uneven cooloing more than sudden cooling. When you park or stop for a while and your brakes are hot, the portion of the disc that is between the pads will stay hot while the rest of the rotor cools down, causing warpage. Not sure if there is a mechanical solution to this. Possibly heavier rotors, cryo treatment, super expensive ceramic rotors. My 96 went through rotors more than other vehicles I've had. They warped before they wore out.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the replies and links you guy's. That's the kind of info I was hoping for and I know there's no miracle cure but I was hoping someone knew of rotors or brakes that would hold up longer than the originals do under my circumstances.
There are alot of guy's on these treads who race or drive off road in mud and water all the time and I thought they may have an answer. So far it looks like the slotted or larger rotors would be the thing to try first. I'm not rich by any means but maybe I can find something at a decent price.
Thanks again for taking the time to answer my questions, Mike
 

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I've been a mech for a couple of decades and can tell you that getting the "normal operation temp" rotors wet in a cold creek will not warp a rotor. Your rotors are warping do to excessive heat; probably when coming down the mountains. I have a 2005 Ford 4X4 that I drive "off road" 60 miles a day, with eight creek crossings on the route. I have no problems with the rotors warping; I do however go through brake shoes and pads like crazy because of all the mud. I am lucky enough to produce 30 oil and gas wells out in the back woods of NE Texas. I have to check them every day, come hell or high water, and I play hell getting to some of them. I own two very capible 4x4's that can get back there with ease, but the company gave me a new full size Ford 4x4 to beat on instead of my rigs. Guys, I've gotta tell you, I love my job.

P.S. Ever want to know Fords 4x4 short falls, I'm yer man.
 
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