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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,
I have been doing some reading on the SAW 2.0s and i have head that thew "new" saw 2.0s are better, is there anyway to tell if they are the newer models from the old? How much better are the 2.0s from the stock bilsteins? Also is there a huge difference between the 2.5 and 2.0 SAW?
Thanks.
 

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Threads are on the top on the new SAWs, while on the old, the threads are on the bottom.

Much better form the bilstiens. You won't regret it.

No experience between the 2.0 and the 2.5, but for the street, 2.5 is overkill. Even on the dirt, 2.0 is massive. 2.5 just allows for more oil capacity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great. Thanks for the tips. Have you heard of any differences between the older SAW and the newer version? Also when buying used coilovers, is there any way to tell if they have truely been rebuilt by looking at them?
 

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the newer 2.0 units are an updated version, pivots top and bottom its supposed to eliminate shaft binding, making them smoother throughout the suspension cycle. i just put in a new set of the older ones and used them hard this last weekend, which ever ones you get you wont be sorry. oh i say spen the money and buy new, just so you know where your starting from, unless you know your getting a good deal.
 

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I bought mine used, in need of a rebuild.

New heims set me back at about 60 bucks. A complete rebuild will cost 100 bucks. Not bad for spending 375 in the first place...

You cannot tell if they have been rebuilt by looking at them. Think, rebuilding requires replacing the seals INSIDE the coilover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah i got a older pair of SAW 2.0 for 250! it has new polyurathane and rebuilt. I can tell the polyurathane is new, but not sure about the rest. I can i can just take his word for it and try them out?
 

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Just try them out. If they are "spongy" rebuild them...

It wouldn't hurt to rebuild them becaue you know you'll be solid for another 20-30k miles.
 

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Rebuilding is easy but baked shock oil smells like death. I mean, it really, really fawking stinks. R&R costs what it costs...usually just $30 for some seals, but if your shafts are pitted they should be replaced, usually about 40$ per shaft. Same thing for rod guides and wear bands if the teflon coating is worn through anywhere. A "complete" rebuild (shafts, guides, bands, seals) will run about 200$ for parts, just do it all yourself if it looks necessary.

I seriously doubt anything changed inside the shocks unless they improved the seals or something (also doubtful, still Viton), they're still a nitro-charged shock with a divider piston, right? So just mechanical and cosmetic changes, not pneumatic or hydraulic. The heims top and bottom are definately better but it's not like the originals with the bushings are garbage or anything.

They'll be better than your stock Bilsteins...they're rebuildable (you'll need to eventually), and the valving *should* be tighter--the front will be more predictable over bumps, and bounce less.

2.0 isn't overkill for dirt on a small truck unless you're not pushing it much. 2.5" in addition to more oil capacity also allows more control over the valving, since you're putting a 5/8" shaft in to a 2.5" body instead of a 2.0" body. Any of those shocks are overkill for the street...

2.0" is barely adequate for a Tundra on the dirt. 2.5" works. If you're really getting it with your Taco, get the 2.5" bodies, but the 2.0" should work fine for you and most people with a lighter truck. If you're loading near GVW and then beating the shit out of it, get the 2.5", they'll last longer.

If they're spongy--if you can easily compress them with your body weight--either the nitro charge is low, or they were recently rebuild but not charged (IIRC you cannot air freight a charged shock). They should have between 150# and 225# of nitrogen, it's enough you should have a lot of trouble compressing them by hand (if at all), unless you're a real gorilla. If there's no nitro charge, a bike or auto speed shop should be able to charge them.

You cannot tell if it was a complete rebuild without opening them, so as long as the shafts aren't pitted, make sure they're charged properly and hammer 'em for a few months and then R&R the seals and oil yourself.
 

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Rebuilding is easy but baked shock oil smells like death. I mean, it really, really fawking stinks. R&R costs what it costs...usually just $30 for some seals, but if your shafts are pitted they should be replaced, usually about 40$ per shaft. Same thing for rod guides and wear bands if the teflon coating is worn through anywhere. A "complete" rebuild (shafts, guides, bands, seals) will run about 200$ for parts, just do it all yourself if it looks necessary.

I seriously doubt anything changed inside the shocks unless they improved the seals or something (also doubtful, still Viton), they're still a nitro-charged shock with a divider piston, right? So just mechanical and cosmetic changes, not pneumatic or hydraulic. The heims top and bottom are definately better but it's not like the originals with the bushings are garbage or anything.

They'll be better than your stock Bilsteins...they're rebuildable (you'll need to eventually), and the valving *should* be tighter--the front will be more predictable over bumps, and bounce less.

2.0 isn't overkill for dirt on a small truck unless you're not pushing it much. 2.5" in addition to more oil capacity also allows more control over the valving, since you're putting a 5/8" shaft in to a 2.5" body instead of a 2.0" body. Any of those shocks are overkill for the street...

2.0" is barely adequate for a Tundra on the dirt. 2.5" works. If you're really getting it with your Taco, get the 2.5" bodies, but the 2.0" should work fine for you and most people with a lighter truck. If you're loading near GVW and then beating the shit out of it, get the 2.5", they'll last longer.

If they're spongy--if you can easily compress them with your body weight--either the nitro charge is low, or they were recently rebuild but not charged (IIRC you cannot air freight a charged shock). They should have between 150# and 225# of nitrogen, it's enough you should have a lot of trouble compressing them by hand (if at all), unless you're a real gorilla. If there's no nitro charge, a bike or auto speed shop should be able to charge them.

You cannot tell if it was a complete rebuild without opening them, so as long as the shafts aren't pitted, make sure they're charged properly and hammer 'em for a few months and then R&R the seals and oil yourself.
Good post. Note that they did change the disc where the oil cylces through. I think the older ones had a little bit stiffer valving.
 
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