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Discussion Starter #1
First off, to clear the air I have a 1wheel drive Taco with lift and is maxed out on tire size with said lift (31's) rear wheel to wheel well clearance is at a premium. After the use of chains up at Tahoe which were "supposed" to fit my 31's I have some very angry wheelwells :mad: They got their cards pulled. Now on to the question

Within the constraints of clearance in back I wanted to put on cables. I have Dakota RVT's (via Pep Boys) M+S rated. By the way I am pleased with their performance. I keep reading that you are not supposed to put cables on snow tires. Every chain/cable seller or web page says the same thing, but noone says WHY I can't use them. Its like telling you 3yr old to not look at the sun and when he says why you say JUST DON'T. :confused:

So anyone have a clue?
 

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Hrmm, after reading your post I got curious and did a search to see what I could come up with...

Well, I didn't come up w/ anything conclusive.

== THIS IS PURE SPECULATION ON MY PART ==
The only thing I can think of is that alot of the "cables" are for "low profile"/limited wheel well space applications. So the cables are "lower profile" i.e. "thinner". Snow tires are by definition aggressive/deep tread. I would suppose some of these cables might just get wedged in the lugs and not provide any traction -- or worse do damage to the tire. So maybe the mfg'rs are just avoiding any liability by saying not to use the product w/ snow tires.

Or, the cables not be able to support the weight/friction of a truck. (I only saw the "don't use cables w/ snow tires" msg'ing when referring to Light Truck products).

I ran cables on my corolla for years -- and it had "snow tires" (M+S rated) -- with no problems. However, running BFG AT's on my taco now, I could see those same cables getting sucked between the lugs like a thong in Miami.

From dot.ca.gov:
SNOW TIRES
The California Vehicle Code, Section 558 defines a snow-tread tire as follows:
"A 'snow-tread tire' is a tire which has a relatively deep and aggressive tread pattern compared with conventional passenger tread pattern". Snow-tread tires can be identified by examining the sidewall of the tire where the letters MS, M/S, M+S or the words MUD AND SNOW have been stamped into the sidewalls.

TIRE TRACTION DEVICES
The California Vehicle Code, Section 605 defines tire traction devices as follows:
"Tire Traction Devices are devices or mechanisms having a composition and design capable of improving vehicle traction, braking and cornering ability upon snow or ice-covered surfaces. Tire traction devices shall be constructed and assembled to provide sufficient structural integrity and to prevent accidental detachment from vehicles. Tire traction devices shall at the time of manufacture or final assembly, bear a permanent impression indicating the name, initials or trademark of the assembling company or primary manufacturer, and the country in which the devices were manufactured or assembled in final form."

http://www.yosemitefun.com/weather_in_yosemite.htm says:
"Tire traction devices can be link chain, cable chain and/or spider straps."

###

So there you have it: absolutely inconclusive mumbo-jumbo that probably didn't answer your question.

cheers,
ryan
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks any way... :cool: My deduction was along the same lines as yours.
 

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the problem with using chains or cables on a snow tire is you're removing the purpose of running a snow tire. the reason that you run a snow tire is the tread blocks have sipps (sp?) that allow for more contact on the road, also a snow tire is a softer compound and the use of chains or cables could damage the tread of the tire. all tires except for high performance car tires are considered mud/snow tires, hope this answered your question.
 
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