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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Does anyone know the part number for the Pinion bearing right behind the head?

I had the bearing fail or the crush sleeve which cause my pinion to kiss the arb a little. No teeth were damaged on the R&P or the ARB. I just need to replace the bearing plus having the shop make a solid sleeve so this never happens again. Hopefully near the end of the week I will have pictures of this damage.

The guy at PORC tried to tell me the guy installed the crush washer wrong or the bearing was starved for fluid. Next he tried to say I had a lift that caused it but at the time I had no lift installed till this weekend when I add a OME but even then the front diff wont have a problem. But at the same time he admitted there has been two Tacoma's with the same probem but I think its a lost cause to fight. I'll have to talk to Alex instead of the current guy.

Alex has done me right before and I dont have a doubt he will again.
 

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Put in a solid pinion spacer next time.
 

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im bringing up an old thread to ask a question about a pinion bearing. we were replacing the crush sleeve on a 98 tacoma. my question is about the small bearing farthest away from the axle, not the big one thats close to the axle like duc was talking about in the beggining of this thread. but anyways we heated the bearing up and put it on. then the seal and the flange. we just couldnt get the pinion nut to tighten down all the way so we finaly took everything back off and realized the small bearing was not on all the way. we ended up busting the bearing trying to get it down more. so my question is are we going to have to check the backlash when we install everything back together? or can we put the new bearing in and be good to go? we really need help this truck has to be running in 2 or 3 days
 

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if all your doing is putting an upper bearing in it then No, but there is alot going on here that needs answers.

If you put a new crush sleeve in the bearing would not go down because the sleeve is holding it up, it has to be crushed into place and the bearing preload set. if your not using a new crush sleeve then you need to. if you got a bearing kit form an aftermarket supplier it is not the same pinion bearing that came in it. they are different so a bckalsh check and a patern check would not be a bad idea. Feel free to give us a call i can help you over the phone anyway i can. thanks, [email protected]
 

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http://www.ttora.com/forum/showthread.php?t=117978 talk with the owner. If you want it done right send it to him. Clamshells are a different animal and not too many people set them up at least wise that don't fail. This guy is good and his turn around is unreal. Thanks
 

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ok we did have a new crush sleeve. thats what needed replacement. we did not replace any bearings or nothing. we took the chunk off, kept track of all the parts and order they came off, threw in a lock rite, then started on replacing the crush sleeve. when we put the bearing on it did not sit on the pinion shaft all the way thats why we could never get it to tighten up. once we realized it we took it off and put it back on with out heating it and damaged it when trying to hammer it on the shaft. so we will replace the upper bearing and seal, and should not have to set the backlash. i didnt think we needed to but i just wanted to hear from others that we did not have to.
 

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Do you know of someone that makes a solid pinion spacer for the 7.5" clamshell and do you know why it would be necessary on a diff. that is quite well protected?
bump for a reply. What does it do?
 

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toyota comes from the factory with crush sleeves. you tighten the pinion nut down and it crushes it inbetween the two pinion bearings. it provides the pinion with enough play so that it dont break the teeth on the ring or pinion. if you tighten the nut to much then it gives the pinion to much play and you can start wearing your teeth down. the solid spacer takes place of this crush sleeve. it comes with shims to provide the correct length and play on the pinion. you tighten it down to a certian torque and its always gona be the same after that. its helps keep the right amount of play without running the risk of tightening it down to much or not enough with the crush sleeve. if you take down your third that far i would highle recomend this solid spacer.
 

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how much does it cost?
 

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They are not available for the clamshell. It would be a custom part. They are mainly needed for differentials that are exposed as Rebuilt indicated. If a diff is set up properly with a crush sleeve and then wheeled hard in the rocks with the pinion take hits it can further crush the sleeve and lead to movement and issues. On the Toyota clamshell it would be very rare to take a hit to the pinion since it it so well tucked up in the frame. So I'm guessing that's why they are not available. OK that's all I didn't know. Thanks
 

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Come on 85 those are for the rear or straight axles up front. NOT the clamshell he is working on or that Mud runs. Thanks
 

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thanks fellas
 

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yes there is no solid spacer made for the clamshell diffs they would have to be custom made with shims, let be known that info posted above about solid spacers had some very incorrect info in it.

Solid spacers seperate the bearings and allow you to preload the bearings to a certain point and torque the nut. they are used b/c of what doc said typically in rear applications you can slam the pinion flange into rocks and this can make the crush sleeve crush more allowing the nut to come loose and then the pinion will walk into the carrier ending in disastor.

typically in a front app your not backing into rocks at speed. however solid spacers are great for stock applications as well b/c it allows you to torque the pinion nut to what installer wants not what crushsleeve dictates and all all gives a better life to a diff in my opinion. i can take a brand new toyota set-up third and take the nut off with my electric impact wiht ease.
 

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ok i didnt understand it real well so sorry for the bad info. but exactly what is ment by preload. how is that set and what is it
 

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there are two tapered bearings in the housing ( taper facing each other) with fixed races. when you tighten the pinion nut it pulls these two bearings toward each other into their respective races. With no spacer solid or chush you can run the pinion nut down until the bearings are so tight in the races that they will not move (this would be Bad) preload is how much effort it takes to turn those bearings. Some preload is very nescisary to insure the pinion can not flop around. To much preload will cause the bearings to wear out very fast. Typical differentials should be set to about 15inch lbs of preload. and this is measured on the pinion nut while turning w/ a beam or needle style torque wrench techinacly preload should be measure as it is rotating not what it takes to start it to turn.

with a crush sleeve. it starts with zero preload and the bearing are not sittting in their races so the pinion can move around you apply force via the pinion nut and as you tighten the nut is crushes the sleeve once you reach the specified preload you stop tightening and it stops crushing. so if you hit a rock and it crushes some more now there is nothing to keep the pinion nut tight the flange will move up and down on the pinion splines. all be it, probably very little now the nut is not tight b/c its not tightened against anything so it can feel free to back itself off once its backed off the pinion can move freely.

a solid spacer starts off to short allowing the bearings to be to tight and you shim the bearings away form each other until their is the specified preload. now you can beat the snot out of it and the nut will never back off. provided you torqued it properly and loctited.
 

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ok like you said on the phone with zack today to tighten the pinion nut to a preload of somewhere between 15 in/lbs to 25 in/lbs. we tightened it to 18 in/lbs. you said you should be able to turn it all the way around with your hand. well what about two hands? lol thats how much it took to turn it. we put some gear oil in it and let it seep through the first big bearing until it got to the little one. it made alittle differnce but not by much. hopefully we didnt tighten it down to much. but hey man thanks for your number and thanks for walking us through it today cause we were confused. but hopefully everything works out for us and we will let you know what happens with it. thanks again
 
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