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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went on an offroading trip this last weekend and the the terrain was primarily mud and various pack of dirt. Now I am getting a sound in my rear drivers side drum it seems. It sounds like someone scuffing their shoe on rough pavement every now and then. I did not jump it or give any unusual jarring impact to the truck that I can recall. Would this just be crap that worked its way into the drum or should I be looking for something else. We gave it a good powerwashing yesterday but today after work I plan on taking the wheel off and seeing if I can see anything. Any ideas on what I should be looking for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am thinking that getting the drum off could be a bitch because of rust. Do the two threaded holes exist for pushing the drum off like the older Toyota pickups? Should I worry about this until I find time or is it pretty important to get whatever is in there out immediately?

EDIT: Mud is all we got, different sides of the country. I like mud except for the mess, I think there are trade-offs for every terrain.
 

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Removing the drum can be easy or it can be real difficult. One side slid off like butter, the other side required lots of rubber mallet beating and cursing. It helps to loosen the brake drum adjustment by sticking a flat-head in the little slot and turning the spoke. I forget which way it needs to be turned, but that should help loosen the shoes so they're not pressed so hard into the drum, preventing its removal. Hope this helps.
 

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get a mallet and a big flat head screwdriver
 

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I have a 98 and the rear drums have threaded holes to help push the drum off, not sure on the size, I just tried a couple till I found a fit. It will help if you let some of the tension off the pads with the screwdriver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Should I worry about doing this ASAP? I do plan on doing it soon but sometimes I dont have as much time during the work week. Is damage probably if left for a little while or is it just a couple gobs of mud brushing on something?
 

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Yes you need to do it as soon as you can cause you don't want to damage the shoes or more expensive things. I clean mine pretty regular as mine gets a squeek after dust and mud starts collecting. Yes the drums should have 2 threaded holes that you can use to get the drum off, mine were on there pretty good the first time I took them off and I never had to touch a hammer or screwdriver. Its best if you have access to a air compressor so you can blow off all the brake dust and mud and i use some brake cleaner and spray pretty liberally then air blast it to dry the cleaner. Put the drum back on and your good to go play again. Probably takes maybe if you have never done it and have floor jack, compressor, etc it might take 20 minutes per wheel.

The bolt size is M8 x 1.25 and I would get one that is atleast 1.5 inches long
or a great thing to have is buy one of the boxes of assorted metric bolts (asian as it will probably say on the box)
Anyways hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, all good advice, thanks. I also plan on putting anti-seize on a lot of surfaces when everything goes back together so that in the future it will be easy although this time may be a struggle. And yes I will know what to put it on and what not to just in case you think I may be smearing anti-seize all over everything I find.
 
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