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Discussion Starter #1
Stupid question...

Since I've started browsing offroad forums I've learned that most people aren't into chains, for some rather obvious safety reasons, but this leads me to wonder something;

Why do most "recovery kits" come with chains?
 

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Chains can be handy for attaching to things, but there needs to be some kind of dynamic/stretchy link between the two vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Cool.

After doing a search it seems that I've used just about every incorrect recovery technique available... just wanted to clear that one up.
 

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Tacoma-dana 44
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Stupid question...

Since I've started browsing off road forums I've learned that most people aren't into chains, for some rather obvious safety reasons, but this leads me to wonder something;

Why do most "recovery kits" come with chains?
Chains are usually used to anchor a vehicle to a tree or other heavy object when needed. The can also be used to extend the length of a winch cable.

Recovery straps will absorb energy created by pulling, instead of breaking. Then, they will produce energy when rebounding, helping with the recovery.

DO NOT use straps with stitched on hooks. By the straps with loops and buy some D-shackles.
 

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Definitely need the strap in between if you are using chain. It helps to absorb the shock load. We pulled a buddy of mine out of the mud many years ago with a chain. The yank was so hard that we put diamond in his frame. Truck frame had to pulled straight again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Chains are usually used to anchor a vehicle to a tree or other heavy object when needed. The can also be used to extend the length of a winch cable.

Recovery straps will absorb energy created by pulling, instead of breaking. Then, they will produce energy when rebounding, helping with the recovery.

DO NOT use straps with stitched on hooks. By the straps with loops and buy some D-shackles.
Thanks.

I currently have a 10ft chain (double hooked), 20ft snatch rope (no hooks) and a couple of 3.25ton shackles.

I'm looking at adding another snatch rope and a couple of axle ropes (they're kinda like a tree saver, only about 2ft long).

I'm not sure what else I'd want/need... other than some extra shackles of the 4ton+ variety.
 

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As stated above, chains can come in handy but should not be used as your primary recovery device. I keep one in my truck if something was to happen to my tree strap and I needed to winch out of something.
 

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Chains are good for anchoring but not snatching ever! Not even with straps attached. The straps are just good for saving the trees, hence the name 'Tree-Savers'.
A chain could be used to strait-line pull another truck down a smooth road but both drivers need experience with doing this too. The towed truck--driver needs to do the braking and the truck towing---driver needs to have a calm accelerator foot and brake.
Chain could also help secure things like you Hi-Lift jack in off-camber situations to avoid slipping and injuries. Many more things to list.
 

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truck ~n~ tow
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Chains can be used... But never as a snatch rope... If you pull evenly with out a lunge they will hold up if the rating is enough... I used to pull Live Bottom Semi trucks outta the wet trash, with a chevy 1ton, at the landfill I worked at for years... Only had a couple break... Only the ones that were underated for the task though... But they are dangerous when they do let go... and that is why straps with looped ends are safer and better for what a wheelers needs are...

Chains are best utilized as tie downs for heavy equipment... I never trusted straps for that...

Bottom line... if a chain is all I had... I'd use it... Just use it safely and with some common sense...
 

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Chains can be used... But never as a snatch rope... If you pull evenly with out a lunge they will hold up if the rating is enough... I used to pull Live Bottom Semi trucks outta the wet trash, with a chevy 1ton, at the landfill I worked at for years... Only had a couple break... Only the ones that were underated for the task though... But they are dangerous when they do let go... and that is why straps with looped ends are safer and better for what a wheelers needs are...

Chains are best utilized as tie downs for heavy equipment... I never trusted straps for that...

Bottom line... if a chain is all I had... I'd use it... Just use it safely and with some common sense...
Exactly, and I failed to mention the most important part about using chains that Dell did mention----the chain's weight rating. Very important. I tried mine on my wife tonight and she liked them! Except she had to shower because of the grease.:D
 

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Yea, for snatching i dont think ill ever use anything metal again. At the mud hole last weekend a brand new 2500HD on 37's was getting yanked out and the chain slipped off the trailer hitch (doh!) of the recovery vehicle. That thing must've took off at about 100mph and sounded like a shotgun- completely destroyed the shiny lil tailgate. a few inches higher and could've easily gone through the rear window (right at the driver's head) Just don't do it... for everyones safety :2cents:
 

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Most high dollar winch chains are not rated for more than 7K/14,000lbs catastrophic failure, put a 20,000+ lb tow strap designed to stretch 20+ percent on the other end of the chain and it becomes rather obvious which end will become the weak link, pun intended! Chain + tow strap/ yank strap = carnage at some point.

Safe uses for a chain include: winching a vehicle or winching from an anchor point, in other words a relativly static tension pull with little or no stretch winch line.

Be safe.

Wally
 

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Discussion Starter #16
On that note, what are the thoughts on high strength snatch ropes?

I use a 10,000lb snatch rope with the theory that it'll probably break before someone's recovery hook does, but I see alot of people who use the giant 20k+ ropes "because they're better".
 

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I carry a 2" 20k lb and a 3" 30k lb. The 3" isn't going to stretch much with our trucks, so I mostly use it as an extension, with the 2" being the primary strap.

IMHO, a 10k is OK, but you're going to be near the limit on anything "dynamic" (rule of thumb is 2x the static load) and you will need to be dilignet about inspection and replacement.
 

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The "more is better" mentality tends to get applied quite a lot without thinking. The only significant factor I know of is that ropes and straps weaken with dirt in them and abrasion. Typical usage conditions when 4-wheeling.
 

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(since the "Newbie Question Light" is on, here goes....)

When using recovery straps, what's the best place to hook onto your truck? Can you hook onto the rear towing hitch? Or where should you hook on?

I've never had to recover anyone/anything, but I'd like to file this away under "general knowledge", just in case.
 

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(since the "Newbie Question Light" is on, here goes....)

When using recovery straps, what's the best place to hook onto your truck? Can you hook onto the rear towing hitch? Or where should you hook on?

I've never had to recover anyone/anything, but I'd like to file this away under "general knowledge", just in case.
The best place would be your tow hooks. If you dont have any (you should probably look at gettin some), use the frame, just make sure things aren't going to be getting in the way and crushed. I have used the trailer hitch (frame part) befoe with no problems. Dont use the actualy tow hitch, unless you have some kind of clamp hitch, or something to keep everything from flying off.
 
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