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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just installed the universal RockJock Antirock swaybar onto the rear of the rig. This is the 45” crossbar with 18” arms. If you decide to do the same install please measure your own truck as the mounting placement will greatly determine what size you will need. The universal kit includes high-quality parts. The rods that connect the arms to your axle comes at 14”. My fabricator had to cut down the lengths, which is suggested by rockjock to make it work. I will be purchasing 8” rods for my particular needs. Again, this will depend on your measurements and decided placement. Wheel spacers may be needed.

You can mount under the frame as we did, or over the frame with enough bed clearance. WheelEveryWeekend on Instagram does his through the frame, which is super clean and can double as a mounting point if you decide to add longer shocks and do a shock relocation. We opted to mount under because of the previous suspension cage my fabricator had built.

The rig definitely has far less body roll. Also because of the body roll and higher center of gravity, my rear tires will often break loose on turns, I no longer have that problem. The rig is much more planted and squatted when going straight and on turns. It's also still very flexy.

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Reppin the Flips on TTORA
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Just installed the universal RockJock Antirock swaybar onto the rear of the rig. This is the 45” crossbar with 18” arms. If you decide to do the same install please measure your own truck as the mounting placement will greatly determine what size you will need. The universal kit includes high-quality parts. The rods that connect the arms to your axle comes at 14”. My fabricator had to cut down the lengths, which is suggested by rockjock to make it work. I will be purchasing 8” rods for my particular needs. Again, this will depend on your measurements and decided placement. Wheel spacers may be needed.

You can mount under the frame as we did, or over the frame with enough bed clearance. WheelEveryWeekend on Instagram does his through the frame, which is super clean and can double as a mounting point if you decide to add longer shocks and do a shock relocation. We opted to mount under because of the previous suspension cage my fabricator had built.

The rig definitely has far less body roll. Also because of the body roll and higher center of gravity, my rear tires will often break loose on turns, I no longer have that problem. The rig is much more planted and squatted when going straight and on turns. It's also still very flexy.

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That looks like a pretty nice setup. I never actually heard of rear sway bars. What advantages does it offer when off-roading?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That looks like a pretty nice setup. I never actually heard of rear sway bars. What advantages does it offer when off-roading?
The advantage for me is to mitigate body roll with about 500lbs+ of equipment weight in the rear, all the while staying very flexy. Also helps with traction when the trail isn't flat. Desert Prerunner builds use them to stabilize the rear end. Also, it is a very common setup for Jeep guys, switching out their stock sway bars and moving to antirock setups.
 
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