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Discussion Starter #1
For those of you working with fiberglass, thought I would share some info on what's currently known about the health hazards of exposure to airborne glass fibers. Thanks to West for giving me the idea:flipoff4:
Although there is not definitive evidence to suggest fiberglass dust is as bad as say asbestos fibers, it is reasonable to assume it is a human carcinogen. Based off the research I have done, here is a summary...take it for what you will. Personally, I am gonna error on the side of caution.

Reversible acute irritations of the skin, eyes, and upper respiratory tract are well known health hazards associated with direct dermal and inhalation exposure to fibrous glass, rock wool, or slag wool in construction and manufacturing workplaces. The wearing of protective clothing and respiratory equipment has been recommended to prevent these health hazards (and possible chronic health hazards) when airborne concentrations of fibers exceed recommended occupational exposure limits of 1 fiber/cc (ACGIH 2001; Jeffress 1999; Mentzer 1999; OSHA 1999).

Possible health hazards from long-term exposure to airborne fibrous glass, rock wool, or slag wool include effects associated with occupational exposure to asbestos (lung scarring, lung cancer, and mesothelioma), but available evidence from epidemiologic and animal studies indicates that these materials are less potent than asbestos. Epidemiologic studies of fibrous glass, rock wool, and slag wool workers provide no consistent evidence for increased risks of mortality from nonmalignant respiratory disease, lung cancer, or pleural mesothelioma. Lung tissue scarring, lung tumors, and mesotheliomas have been observed in rodents exposed to glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool fibers by intratracheal, intrapleural, or intraperitoneal administration, but these lesions were not observed in several studies of rodents exposed by inhalation to glass wool fibers. Most synthetic vitreous fibers are less durable in lung tissue than asbestos. This difference is thought to be key in explaining the difference in potency. At chronic exposure levels below currently recommended occupational exposure limits of 1 fiber/cc, elevated risks for developing nonmalignant or malignant respiratory disease are not expected.
Don't interoperate this last statement as a free pass. It simply means that exposure to glass fibers BELOW the permissible levels for an extended period is not likely to lead to lung disease. 1 fiber per cc every 8 hrs is not a lot, much less than we could ever see with the naked eye.
Stay safe out there boyz!
 

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:lmao: Don't listen to Nate...he's a lib and thinks the gubment should outlaw fiberglass to protect us all...I heard he's Prius shopping as we speak!:lmao::lmao::lmao:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I seem to be coughing alot...think I might be catching something.:D

Yes you are, it's called HIV. We all told you about Chad's Mom...:flipoff4::bhump:


Disclaimer: I don't even know Chad, or his Mom for that matter. However, she seems to be quite popular amongst the BBC...
 

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It's no wonder you're so damn dumb. You can't learn shit from stupid people, dumbass. They are after all stupid. DUH!! :lmao:

Lol, def not a lib! And def not prius shopping...but they do go hand in hand. This is simply an opportunity to learn from the stupid people.:D
 
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