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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm currently running GY Duratrac 265/75/16s. Been happy with them off-road and OK with them on the road with the exception of the noise as they've worn, which still isn't that bad. I've got two with 60,000 miles on them that need replacing and two with maybe 20,000 on them that I can still run for quite a while. I bought them originally because they were the best combination of aggressive tread design and relatively lightweight but fairly rugged tire. I have not been disappointed with them. The two I replaced were from direct punctures through the tread from a nail and a very sharp rock that was my fault, no sidewall failure.

My off-road use is moderate to difficult trails, some sand, a little bit of local wheeling (Phoenix), but mostly following a road trip (J TREE, Northern Arizona, southeastern Utah, etc.). I also developed some back problems in my 60s, so I hate the idea of hosting around heavy tires to change if I don't have to. I'm usually heavily loaded for camping when I'm off road too.

I'm thinking of three options:
1) replace the two bad Duratracs and motor on. Still a real good solution for me. Cheaper and easier. The downsides are a little more highway noise than I'd like, especially as they wear. While I've never had trouble with the side walls, I still don't love the 2 plies.
2) BFG T/A KO2s in 235/85/16s. More expensive because I have to replace all four, but better highway manners and noise. from the reviews these are alot better than the old KOs and I wouldn't give up much off road. They're heavier than what I have (3lbs), but here's the theory to shoot down: seems like the improved rolling resistance and narrower profile would come pretty close to offsetting the additional weight mileage wise. I'm also hoping the ride wouldn't be too rocky on the road running them around 45 psi, which is where I run my current Duratracs anyway. Can anybody confirm or refute that based on your experience?

I'm leaning towards option 2 or maybe 2A which is the Duratracs in 235/85/16, but I think I want to try to KO2s at this point. I know most of the issues of pizza cutter tires versus others, and I read a whole lot of the posts on 235/85/16's, so mostly I'm just trying to figure out if my theory about option 2 is pure BS or not. Forget the cost difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Shoulda said …

Current Duratrac 265/75/16s are load level Cs, vs the 235/85 options both being LL Es
 

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I never had luck with Duratracs, ended up throwing them away with tread available. I'm also getting older and hate changing tires thus I only buy E rated side walls. Just my 2 cents


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I like the 235/85's, but I don't run at 45psi, I run them 35 front 30 rear unless I put a ton of weight in the truck. I don't find them to be overly stiff, and I put kyb monomax shocks all round which are stiffer than stock anyhow so it would be noticeable if they rode like bricks. The speedometer reads perfect with them, but now the odometer reads a bit low, so I have to calculate that in when i do MPG figures.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You'll want to avoid the E rated tires if you can. Those are much stiffer so they will make for a rougher ride.
Yeah, that's a concern. The guys at Discount Tire told me most tire brands have phased out or are phasing out LL Cs in their light truck lines. Sure seems like there's few Cs and Ds in most of the better AT or hybrid tires. �� My problem is I do a bit of everything off-road and often solo/single vehicle (do a lot of backcountry photography farther away from home). Getting the right balance in the tires is an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I like the 235/85's, but I don't run at 45psi, I run them 35 front 30 rear unless I put a ton of weight in the truck. I don't find them to be overly stiff, and I put kyb monomax shocks all round which are stiffer than stock anyhow so it would be noticeable if they rode like bricks. The speedometer reads perfect with them, but now the odometer reads a bit low, so I have to calculate that in when i do MPG figures.
Yeah, I was thinking I'd have to run 'em lower. Discount Tire told me 40psi minimum otherwise too much sidewall heating from micro flexing. I get that for highway speeds, but maybe not in daily driving.

What did you run before the 235/85s and how much difference was there? What vehicle? Didn't see one in your profile.
 

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01 Tacoma ext cab. I've traveled coast to coast on 20 yr old firestone 235/85's that had a lot of dry rot cracking, at 35psi and they held fine so I don't buy "microflexing". The weight of the truck vs the air pressure inside is what determines the flexing. If you put a 8k lb truck on them at 35 psi, yeah they're going to be squishy and overheat, but our 4k vehicles aren't going to do that. This is it on cooper m/t's in 235/85


Now I'm running a mix of brands all street tread. Previous tires I've run are 31x10.5r15 BFG at's, 265/70r16 kelly safari's, and 235/75r15 snow tires, none of which have been a noticeably softer ride than the 235/85's. It's getting harder to find used tires in that size though, all the 3/4 ton trucks went up to 17" wheels for their skinny tire option.
 
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