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When should the 3.4L get its plugs changed. The manual does not call for it with the 3.4. Any ideas?
 

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Sorry, I know I just got flamed. Thank you ShowStop for help. I did look at that link and it is what I have in the truck. I guess I sould not ask this question, but I can assume by what I have seen here that our trucks are not equiped with the platinum plugs?
 

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Nope, no platinums. Stick with the factory Toyota plugs, it's your best bet.
 

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I just changed my the other day. My denso's looked alot worse than the ngks. I just went with all ngks anyways but there was a substantial difference.
 

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If cost was not a factor, go with the Denso Iridiums. You won't have to replace them for along time...100K. They'll cost about 10 bucks each.
 

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I just got new spark plugs from URD and I have a question. I got the Denso Platinum Spark Plugs and I had a question, what should I gap them to? They are double prong plugs. Thanks
 

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I just got new spark plugs from URD and I have a question. I got the Denso Platinum Spark Plugs and I had a question, what should I gap them to? They are double prong plugs. Thanks
Should NOT require gapping change. Factory set.
 

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I don't think they come gapped, if the correct gapping is .044 then the plugs I got are not gapped right unless dual prong spark plugs are gapped to a different size.
 

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Call the manufactuer, they're factory set..
 

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Talked to URD and I was told the plugs DO NOT come with the gapped, you need to gap them to .042
Just a little FYI for you..From 4x4 wire:The factory installs different brands of spark plugs on each side of the 3.4L V6 engine. As near as I can recall, the more expensive NGK plugs are used on the passenger side of the engine, under the coil packs. If it makes it easier for you, it would be perfectly fine to use NGK plugs in all six cylinders. Generally, spark plugs are sold un-gapped, meaning that you would have to adjust the gap prior to installing. Both the NGK and Denso plugs specified in my Owner's Manual are sold pre-gapped at .044", which is close enough to the .043" requirement in the Manual.

Also..NGK part-no BKR5EKB-11 is the plug for the 3.4. The "11" at the end of the part # denotes a .044 pre-gap, don't believe it?? Call the manufacturer..I'm not talking out my ass, I've been in the auto parts business for 21 years and was a dealership Parts Manager for 12 of those. Just trying to save you the hassle..:2cents:
 

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Thanks for the info, I already bought the plugs. I got them from URD and the plugs I got from them are sold without the correct gap.
 

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bringing this back to solidify what tacocrazy said about gapping bkr5ekb-11 spark plugs. they do not need to be gapped they come with a .44 gap from the factory. if you look at ngk's website they say the 11 = .44 gap
http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/docs/tech/design_symbols_plugs.pdf

i know there were many misconceptions regarding this question.
 

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I tried to tell them but I guess my 20 years experience didn't matter..Thanks for that though..
Well, checking the gap for the plugs isnt bad advice. It takes all of five seconds per plug.


The sparkplugs in the package are supposed to have a cardboard sheath to limit them bouncing around inside the box during handling, but it doesnt always prevent it, and even though they are pregapped its a good idea to check the gap to make sure it hasnt closed a little bit.


Spark plugs are always designated in a specific service/replacemnt time interval, but it is my experience that they dont always NEED to be changed at that time. Its usually just preventative maintenance to replace them, especially because they are cheap, but if one so desired a simple cleaning and regapping could yeild a plug life probably three or four times that of the manufactuerers specified interval until they need to be changed due to wear on the electrode. Sparkplugs also last a helluva lot longer in a good running engine. Sparkplugs are your window into your engine, you can see how your combustion flows, your timing, mixture, arc etc by inspecting the plugs. A lot of guys dont know how to "read" their plugs and simply put them in and forget about them until its the specified interval to change. Id recomend pulling them every five to seven thousand miles to inspect and check the gap. I check mine about every other oil change.



As far as my recomendation on the plugs to use, use toyota. Not that the autolite specials wont work, they likely will be more than sufficient in a stock motor, but nickel and diming your engine components spending $1.29 per plug as opposed to $2.50 per plug isnt going to empty your wallet and its good piece of mind. Personally, I have been using some ngk iridums for quite sometime. I check the pluga and gap reigously and havent had to make any real adjustments in the nearly 20k miles Ive put on them. other than normal discoloration, there seems to be no noticable wear. They are considerably more expensive however.
 

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Well, checking the gap for the plugs isnt bad advice. It takes all of five seconds per plug.


The sparkplugs in the package are supposed to have a cardboard sheath to limit them bouncing around inside the box during handling, but it doesnt always prevent it, and even though they are pregapped its a good idea to check the gap to make sure it hasnt closed a little bit.


Spark plugs are always designated in a specific service/replacemnt time interval, but it is my experience that they dont always NEED to be changed at that time. Its usually just preventative maintenance to replace them, especially because they are cheap, but if one so desired a simple cleaning and regapping could yeild a plug life probably three or four times that of the manufactuerers specified interval until they need to be changed due to wear on the electrode. Sparkplugs also last a helluva lot longer in a good running engine. Sparkplugs are your window into your engine, you can see how your combustion flows, your timing, mixture, arc etc by inspecting the plugs. A lot of guys dont know how to "read" their plugs and simply put them in and forget about them until its the specified interval to change. Id recomend pulling them every five to seven thousand miles to inspect and check the gap. I check mine about every other oil change.



As far as my recomendation on the plugs to use, use toyota. Not that the autolite specials wont work, they likely will be more than sufficient in a stock motor, but nickel and diming your engine components spending $1.29 per plug as opposed to $2.50 per plug isnt going to empty your wallet and its good piece of mind. Personally, I have been using some ngk iridums for quite sometime. I check the pluga and gap reigously and havent had to make any real adjustments in the nearly 20k miles Ive put on them. other than normal discoloration, there seems to be no noticable wear. They are considerably more expensive however.
who's not checking the gap before installation? that should be a given with any plug before it gets installed.....

ok, so many years ago with my '76 pontiac TA (worked) i experimented with several types of plugs. lots of mumbo-jumbo in the plugs world too. my 413 motor ran slightly rich (for a reason) and my plugs would eventually get "fouled" over time (not completely fouled, but turning sooty, etc). i ran Autolites. i then tried my own "mod" to a standard set of autolites which cured the plug issue i was seeing.

i simply drilled a small hole into the very end of the ground strap (see pic below). i then took a old furnace transformer, hooked it to the plug and watched the spark. the spark would jump and travel around the edge of the hole. ok, that was cool, i had a "twirling" spark. i then used a set in my TA and after some time i checked the plugs. what i found was where the spark hit the ground strap it was completely clean (a clean pad area around the hole) while away from this area the underside of the ground strap was black/sooty. not really sure if this "hole" made for a better burn kernel, but it did help the plug stay clean. i never had a issue with the electrode itself, it was always a nice gunmetal gray color with no deteriation.

i was using 99cent Autolites at the time so i didnt really care if i had to change them 2 or 3 times per year (which i didnt have too). they worked just as good as any other plug.

bottom end view of plug
 
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