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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here is the out come of this afternoon's wheeling. I was thinking of doing a little jump before I headed out for the day, ended up getting all four tires off the ground. Sadly no one got a shot of the jump.










So I don't know what to do yet. Get another waggy housing and swap everything over, this time gusset inner knuckles to the tubes on both sides...Or should I take this as a message to upgrade...I don't use this truck to go anywhere anymore and doing a 60 is pricey. Could I do rockwells with the current springs? Part of me likes this idea.


-James
 

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Did somebody get into the tubes real bad trying to get the welds on the C's to rotate or something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My best bet is the metal was weakened when rewelding the knuckles after I rotated it. Maybe preheat and cool slower? The crack/rip starts just a bit past the weld on the tube side.
 

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You could go with an HP44 from a Ford. I know the axle tubes on those are like 1/2" thick. Just an idea :)
 

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My best bet is the metal was weakened when rewelding the knuckles after I rotated it. Maybe preheat and cool slower? The crack/rip starts just a bit past the weld on the tube side.
just out of curiosity...... where the axle tubes pitted from years of corrosion like mine?

I'm seriously thinking of re-tubing the housing. The only place that does this is a couple hours away and quite expensive. The other idea I had was to gusset the length of the tubes, or sleeve the long tube with a larger diameter, heavy wall tube. The sleeve tube would not be full length leaving space for a 360 weld on the ends of the sleeve tube, knuckle and pumpkin ends. I would probably drill out one inch holes strategically along the sleeve tube for CO2 spot welds, joinin the double tubes, making it more rigid. Its a brain storm option I came up with :rolleyes:. The trick would be finding tube that would fit perfectly over the original tube. :confused:
Has anyone "sleeved" a axle tube out there?

sorry if I'm highjacking yer thread!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The idea to sleeve has been bouncing around my head as well. I found some tube 3/8 wall 3" ID tube on ebay. I think this might work if you know your axle is not bent. I am trying to think of a good way to check mine. No point of sleeving it if its bent already.
 

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my axle is off the truck.
I used a straight edge level, setting it flush against the tube on the top and sides while using a flash light, illuminating from behind. Watching if the light reveals a bow or arch along the length of the tube. It was one of the first things I checked for after I scrapped all the junkyard crap off the tubes.
After using a wire wheel too take the housing down to bare metal, I checked the tube again with the light and level. the long tube is dead straight but the light revealed the depth of the pitting on the tube. The pitting on my tube will be a weak point.
After researching axle repair, some hotrod thread on the intardweb mentioned using filler welds for pitting on a ford axle tube, then grind/ disk sand the tube flush. Filler welds making up for lost material. I guess it worked for a Rodder....Hmmmm........ That sounds feasible, It would take for ever.....
Filling small areas and letting it cool as not to warp the tube. If I did this, I would still sleeve or gusset the tube. Filler welds maybe more work than its worth if I end up sleeving the original tube.
 

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After researching axle repair, some hotrod thread on the intardweb mentioned using filler welds for pitting on a ford axle tube, then grind/ disk sand the tube flush. Filler welds making up for lost material. I guess it worked for a Rodder....Hmmmm........ That sounds feasible, It would take for ever.....
My sliders got dents from the bender. I had a dent about the side of a silver dollar on one of them. I filled it with weld, and grinded it back smooth.

You can't even tell anything happened...

I would imagine that if the weld was run too cold, it wouldn't add any stregnth to the tubing.

But if hot enough where you penetrate into it, I don't see why it would be a problem. To fill those little imperfections, it shouldn't take more than a half a hour or so to weld and grind down flush.

I think those dents on my sliders totaled about a little over a hour. I had 4 dents, the largest being almost the size of a silver dollar, the rest were quarter sized...
 

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Housings are cheap.
 

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My sliders got dents from the bender. I had a dent about the side of a silver dollar on one of them. I filled it with weld, and grinded it back smooth.

You can't even tell anything happened...

I would imagine that if the weld was run too cold, it wouldn't add any stregnth to the tubing.

But if hot enough where you penetrate into it, I don't see why it would be a problem. To fill those little imperfections, it shouldn't take more than a half a hour or so to weld and grind down flush.

I think those dents on my sliders totaled about a little over a hour. I had 4 dents, the largest being almost the size of a silver dollar, the rest were quarter sized...
Harbor Freight Benders are the suck. I use rolled up shop rags to minimize dimples. And actually, I don't get any :D Other people use this method: Say you are using 1.5" pipe on your stuff. The OD of that material is 1.9 so you'd cut out a piece of 2" pipe (in half lengthwise) and make like 5 or 6" long pieces. If you put the pieces between the 1.5" pipe and the rollers, it also helps with the dimples pretty well.

Anyway, back on subject :D
 

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It depends on which year and which application Brian. Not all HP Ford axles are the same. However given the relative weakness of D44 ball joints and the weight of these trucks, jumping is never a very good idea.
 

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First, buy a quad or sand rail or something if you want to do jumps. Then I'd say just get a new housing, or go to the Ford HP44.
 

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Check out Cranes new inner C's... they kick ass.

Yogi

Here is the out come of this afternoon's wheeling. I was thinking of doing a little jump before I headed out for the day, ended up getting all four tires off the ground. Sadly no one got a shot of the jump.










So I don't know what to do yet. Get another waggy housing and swap everything over, this time gusset inner knuckles to the tubes on both sides...Or should I take this as a message to upgrade...I don't use this truck to go anywhere anymore and doing a 60 is pricey. Could I do rockwells with the current springs? Part of me likes this idea.


-James
 

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Joined
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Harbor Freight Benders are the suck. I use rolled up shop rags to minimize dimples. And actually, I don't get any :D Other people use this method: Say you are using 1.5" pipe on your stuff. The OD of that material is 1.9 so you'd cut out a piece of 2" pipe (in half lengthwise) and make like 5 or 6" long pieces. If you put the pieces between the 1.5" pipe and the rollers, it also helps with the dimples pretty well.

Anyway, back on subject :D
I filled mine with sand and packed it and plugged the ends.

It helped with the kinking, but the rollers were too close together and thats why I got dimples. I shoulda ordered more material so it wouldn't have happened.
 
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