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Discussion Starter #1
Watched a couple videos on TBI, and wanted to share this one. Many things were shared in the video that I have the same difficulties with, of course some of it I don't have difficulties with.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dyqGys9Htbo

I was diagnosed with traumatic brain injury in November 2005 after full cognitive testing, the VA didn't tell me about this diagnoses for a few years. Of course they were supposed to tell me, but I somehow slipped through the cracks. At the time I was diagnosed the VA didn't have a TBI clinic, they started up a TBI clinic and I started working on it there in August 2012. The woman running the clinic quit and went to a private job this spring (around April).

During those 20 months I was going to the TBI clinic every week, we would work on memory and focus by doing a variety of things, including worksheets, memory games, and purposely overloading the brain with multitasking and distractions. It was harder for me to do things during that time (because my brain was being worked so hard), now I would say it helped me though. There are now times I can explain to people why I am having difficulty being able to interact with them, and need to put all my focus on what I'm doing. Before, I wouldn't be able to speak in those situations. There are still times I get overloaded and can't speak though.

Who knows how long it will take the VA to get a new person to run the clinic, but I will probably go back when they do.
 

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Thats a bummer they let you slip through the cracks man. Keep working at it though, you'll keep getting better and better as long as you keep working and striving towards your goals.

For two years i worked as a life skills trainer, day in and day out helping civilians and vets with TBI's. One thing i noticed was all the military members had the drive,purpose and resilience to see where they wanted to be and work hard towards that goal.

Anyways enough rambling, Keep it up man and thank you for your service.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Small world to have someone that worked with TBI patients respond right away, thanks.

For the most part the local VA hospital is pretty good. It is a large bureaucracy though, and it takes time to go through the process of hiring someone. I wasn't writing this to complain about the VA, I wanted to spread information about traumatic brain injury. It's enough that it's hard for me to do what I used to take for granted, but occasionally there are people that misinterpret my difficulties and make it even harder. Instead of seeing "Ed's overwhelmed and needs all his attention to focus on what he's doing", they see "Ed's ignoring people", and it just gets worse from there.

So I thought bringing this out in the open could help things go smoother in the future.
 

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Watched a couple videos on TBI, and wanted to share this one. Many things were shared in the video that I have the same difficulties with, of course some of it I don't have difficulties with.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dyqGys9Htbo

I was diagnosed with traumatic brain injury in November 2005 after full cognitive testing, the VA didn't tell me about this diagnoses for a few years. Of course they were supposed to tell me, but I somehow slipped through the cracks. At the time I was diagnosed the VA didn't have a TBI clinic, they started up a TBI clinic and I started working on it there in August 2012. The woman running the clinic quit and went to a private job this spring (around April).

During those 20 months I was going to the TBI clinic every week, we would work on memory and focus by doing a variety of things, including worksheets, memory games, and purposely overloading the brain with multitasking and distractions. It was harder for me to do things during that time (because my brain was being worked so hard), now I would say it helped me though. There are now times I can explain to people why I am having difficulty being able to interact with them, and need to put all my focus on what I'm doing. Before, I wouldn't be able to speak in those situations. There are still times I get overloaded and can't speak though.

Who knows how long it will take the VA to get a new person to run the clinic, but I will probably go back when they do.
Thanks for sharing because you have educated me about TBI which until now I knew nothing about. Best of luck furthering your recovery.
 

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Good post, keep up the hard work buddy. I am retired military, with a 60% service connected disability rating and my own personal experience with the VA has been superb.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks ecar. I've paid attention to your support for veterans, and had a good idea you would want to know more about what we go through. But, as you can see in the video, TBI isn't just a veteran thing, it's a human thing.

The last guy in the video said one of the toughest things about TBI is other people can't see what's happening, and it leaves them guessing as to what's going on. That right there has caused me a whole lot of stress, and made things much worse than they need to be. I've had people decide I'm being an ass, and therefore be an ass back to me (argue). That sends the stress through the roof, and I can't function at all at that point. The first woman in the video talked about her mind going blank in similar situations.

The whole time I've been living with this there have also been people that can see that I get overwhelmed, and they need to back off. To them it's so obvious, they can't understand that anyone can't see what's going on. They see the people that push me and make things even worse as the problem, not me. So I've hung around with the people that are understanding, and low stress. Meanwhile, hoping others will catch on before too long.

I think most people would be accepting and not a problem if they knew what was happening, that's why I've been spreading the word as I can. A few months ago I got some cards that explain the situation, and have been handing them out as needed. I keep some in the glove box in case the need arises, and have also given them to people I sometimes interact with.

The other veterans with TBI, and VA staff I've had contact with are amazed I am able to be a part of a group. The other veterans limit their contact to people that are informed and understanding, family members and close friends. I guess I'm a glutton for punishment, putting myself through the extreme difficulty that comes from participating with others. Well, I want to get things done, and am willing to do as much as I can. Sometimes that means zero interaction with others around me, but I can keep doing as much as my condition allows.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ha ha.

I've been told pushing the envelope is the only way to a recovery, but pushing to do as much as I can is also who I am, that part hasn't changed. In the video they talk about TBI is the hardest thing to recover from because it changes every part of who you are, well not everything, but a lot (for me anyway).
 
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