TTORA Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

In the constant quest to service my truck as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible, I am wondering what the average Tacoma (around '02) V6 water pump life is?? Some say have it replaced when you do your timing belt, since that area will be all taken apart anyway, while others swear to run it into the ground, and 90k is too early for replacement.

Who is right??

Thanks,

Beave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,997 Posts
Beave said:
Hey all,

In the constant quest to service my truck as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible, I am wondering what the average Tacoma (around '02) V6 water pump life is?? Some say have it replaced when you do your timing belt, since that area will be all taken apart anyway, while others swear to run it into the ground, and 90k is too early for replacement.

Who is right??

Thanks,

Beave
There is a lot of labor involved in getting things torn down that far. It would be silly to not replace the water pump while you are doing the timing belt.

Later,
....Mike
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,442 Posts
Beave said:
Hey all,

In the constant quest to service my truck as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible, I am wondering what the average Tacoma (around '02) V6 water pump life is?? Some say have it replaced when you do your timing belt, since that area will be all taken apart anyway, while others swear to run it into the ground, and 90k is too early for replacement.

Who is right??

Thanks,

Beave
Just had my 99, V6 gone through with 107k on it. The t-belt was stretched pretty good and the h2o pump was seeping out the top. Some change them earlier, some wait. If you are doing the t-belt, do the pump. Why pay for the labor twice when it could all get done at once. Also do the t-stat, hoses, other belts and rad flush while in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Well I havent done it but I read a comprehensive write-up and I say that if you were to do it yourself why not do the t-belt alone and do it again for the water pump... unless theres obvious signs of wear on the pump. Sure its plenty of work but nothing someone couldnt handle. But if its going in to a shop and your gonna pay them for it then just get it done all at once
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,997 Posts
Yeti said:
Well I havent done it but I read a comprehensive write-up and I say that if you were to do it yourself why not do the t-belt alone and do it again for the water pump... unless theres obvious signs of wear on the pump. Sure its plenty of work but nothing someone couldnt handle. But if its going in to a shop and your gonna pay them for it then just get it done all at once
Seems like the same thing as replacing your clutch disk and pressure plate, but not replacing the pilot bearing and release bearing while you are in there. Time is money, and even if you are doing the work yourself, I don't see how anyone can justify all that time and not do some preventive maintenance along the way.

Later,
....Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Yeti said:
Well I havent done it but I read a comprehensive write-up and I say that if you were to do it yourself why not do the t-belt alone and do it again for the water pump... unless theres obvious signs of wear on the pump. Sure its plenty of work but nothing someone couldnt handle. But if its going in to a shop and your gonna pay them for it then just get it done all at once
I might support that idea if there was a way to look at a water pump and visually determine the life remaining. Brakes are easy to estimate, so are drive belts, and tires. But there is no way to determine if the pump is good for another 60K miles or 60 miles. As was mentioned, a water pump was replaced at 107K miles with a belt. I would venture to bet that there was no outwards signs that the pump was getting ready to give up the ghost. For several hours of labor under the hood, I would replace everything that I had to remove or stuff that is just plain easy to get at. While changing a timiming belt I would replace the drive belts, thermostat, coolant, water pump, and hoses. Not cause they would be faulty, but why go through the trouble to put back on old parts, just to have to turn around and pull all that junk back off to get at one thing......that failed, and left me stranded.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,997 Posts
TacoPoPo said:
I would replace everything that I had to remove or stuff that is just plain easy to get at. While changing a timiming belt I would replace the drive belts, thermostat, coolant, water pump, and hoses. Not cause they would be faulty, but why go through the trouble to put back on old parts, just to have to turn around and pull all that junk back off to get at one thing......that failed, and left me stranded.
And as a bonus, you get to keep all the old stuff for trail spares! There are some things that are really cheap to replace, like the radiator hoses, but when one dies out on the trail, it can be a show stopper!

Later,
....Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Yeah your right, I would do it all at once now that I think about it, can i delete my other post? lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Yeti said:
can i delete my other post? lol
Nah, it is actually a good post for people to read. Worked many years in the auto service field and it amazed me the amount of people that would get cheap on the important, inexpensive items. Oh well $60/hr labor racks up the second time around.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top