TTORA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey I'm trying to (as a hobby) do some welding stuff like making a bed bar, sliders or simple things like that. I have a bender but I've never welded. I'm looking at buying a welder. what kind would I buy for simple things like that. I've looked a little and seen all the different ones (mig, arc, and so forth) Maybe someone could point me in the right direction to finding info on the different kinds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
if you have 220 i would suggest a millermatic 210, or if you have the money a 251. may be to big for what you need now but it will do about anything in one pass. either way a miller or lincon wont let ya down
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I have a Millermatic 175, and its a great little welder. I would go with that or even the 135, they both work good. Im also taking MIG at the local College, thats also a very good, realtivley inexspensive way to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
The smaller 120V welders are great for starting out, but you'll soon wish you'd gotten something bigger.
I've got a Clarke 135 with gas that does great for small projects, but on heavy items I tack things together and go finish them off with my buddy's Lincoln 4200.
You could probably start out without gas using Flux Core wire and add gas later to keep initial cost's down.

Tim
 

·
The Satanic Panic
Joined
·
609 Posts
trust me in the long run the 220 welders will work in your favor, the ones at lowes are only good for sheet metal and tacking, very low duty cycle, id go with the millermatic 175 or 210, or DVI which runs off 220 or 110
:welder:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I have a Power Mig 300 nascar edition and i love it, 0.35 soild wire with mix mix gold gas and aluminum with argon gas, I can stick weld with it and tig weld with it the best shop machine i ever bought its around 4500 bucks and requires single phase big power tho.

:welder:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,295 Posts
if you've never welded, i'd suggest taking a class or something...get the hang of it and learn the right techniques before you start making stuff for your truck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
If you want truly cheap, get a 110V arc welder. The only thing is that it is more difficult than mig and not as powerful as 220. I think a brand new craftsman is only like $120. I have welded countless stuff with mine, and while I would like a bigger welder, it does everything. I have even welded holes shut on the body of my old ford. In reality, for learning, mig is the easiest, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,478 Posts
The newest lincoln and miller 110v units are pretty good, you can weld up to 3/16 inch without problems once you get the hang of it. Plus, you don't have the power hungry problems of a tig unit, or the cost. Welder, plus bottle and gas conversion kit is around $450. You're better off to do this, and take a welding class; you'll be surprised how well you will do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
thanks for all the suggestions. I am going to check out NOVA (community college) today and see if they are offering any classes. thanks again for all the suggestions. :welder:
 

·
newbie
Joined
·
609 Posts
Djmudflap-I recently purchased the Lincoln 135+ and have had a ball with it. It cannot do the rated 1/4" thick without multiple passes but then again I don't have that much material to weld frequently. The thing to be concerned about is what you intend to weld. Take two peices of steel(any size) and weld them together. See what it takes to snap the weld. If you are going to weld anything you want to put your life on the line for remember how easily the weld broke. Get lots of practice in and you will see how quickly you improve but for your safety take is slow. Sliders and bedbars probably won't kill you but am improperly made bumper or suspension setup can. Good call on asking what people use and what sucks. I found some rebuilt 120V Lincolns on a few websites that were pretty cheap and had a warranty. Be prepared to spend around $600 for everything to safely weld.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
djmudflap said:
thanks for all the suggestions. I am going to check out NOVA (community college) today and see if they are offering any classes. thanks again for all the suggestions. :welder:
hey man, I'm in Nor VA aswell. I'm not sure about all the NOVA campuses, but I'm postive the Manassas one has a welding program. I plan on taking it this summer or fall myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,712 Posts
djmudflap said:
that thing is like 1300 bucks what about the ones for like 300 bucks at lowes
The problem with the kinds like the have at Lowes is that they are the "get you by" kind of welders. They weld, but leave a lot to be desired in regards to what kind of stuff you can weld with it and fine tuning usually is lacking as well.

For instance, I looked into buying a Miller Thunderbolt (the el cheapo Miller), so I test drove one at a friend's house. It couldn't hardly handle 1/8inch 7018, it just doesn't have the oomph to do it, even though it is a 220 AC/DC arc welder, the high DC side was around 160. My welds were marginal, so so welds. The duty cycle on these welders is like 15%, which isn't much.

The cheap mig welders are the same way, only deceptively worse because they are easier to use. The ones without the gas do a marginal job at best, and the welds tend to break right down the middle because the flux doesn't block all the hydrogen checking. Having jacked around a little with them, that has been my experience.

I have not seen it suggested, so I will toss this in, and that is to consider being patient watch the papers and look for an auction where a foundary, machine shop, auto repair, fabricating place is going out of business. I have seen 2k welders new go for $500 used.

Hope you find what you want at the price your willing to pay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
muddypenguin said:
hey man, I'm in Nor VA aswell. I'm not sure about all the NOVA campuses, but I'm postive the Manassas one has a welding program. I plan on taking it this summer or fall myself.

ya I'm in centerville so manassas would be real close. I checked their website they have a ton of different classes. now I'm not sure where I should start. I'm going to give them a call and see if I could talk to one of the professors. hopefully they should be able to recommend where to start.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,538 Posts
I'm also looking at welders. I figure (as stated) to start with a 220V. Anybody have experence with Hobart??? little less $$$ and seems about same as lincoln or miller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
It's amazing what you can do with a lincoln weldpak 100. Be sure to get one with gas, use 75/25 argon/co2 and don't listen about the duty cycle BS. I have welded a LOT of stuff with this setup... My friend uses the hobart in the same manner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
djmudflap said:
ya I'm in centerville so manassas would be real close. I checked their website they have a ton of different classes. now I'm not sure where I should start. I'm going to give them a call and see if I could talk to one of the professors. hopefully they should be able to recommend where to start.
All ya'll NOVA boys.....I have an old Craftsman 220V Arc welder. I can weld anything up to 1/4" with a single pass and it was very easy to learn. I would suggest learning on a stick, then using a MIG, unless you are like me and can't afford a MIG. Arc welding is cheap, the new equipment is much cheaper than a MIG that can weld comprable thickness and, with practice, you can weld in any position easily. The hardest part is learning how to strike an arc. Once you have that down, it is gravy. For around $500 you can get a new AC/DC arc welder that will do almost 1/2" material in one pass. Hard to beat....

Boheefus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Hobarts are OK for the hobbiest, but they aren't as good quality as the miller or lincoln, lincoln has the best drive system available. :welder:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Taking a class first is the way to go. After two classes, I had done MIG and Stick and also got to play with lots of fab tools and a plasma cutter :) After all that, I decided to go TIG. I got a Miller Dynasty 200DX, not cheap, but I will never outgrow it and can weld about any type of metal. With the tank, and Contractors added to the cost, the total was $3000+ :)
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top