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gearbox said:
I'm having some sliders made and I thought I wanted Grade 8. Thinking about it I probably want something with less stretch. What should it be? Grade 7 zinc-plated?
G8 will be fine. Why do you want it to strech!? If you are breaking/bending/streching a G8 bolt on your sliders... you have other issues. The bolts just clamp the slider to the truck, the design bears the weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wgasa84 said:
G8 will be fine. Why do you want it to strech!? If you are breaking/bending/streching a G8 bolt on your sliders... you have other issues. The bolts just clamp the slider to the truck, the design bears the weight.
I don't want it to stretch.
 

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Going to a lower grade will increase the chance of it stretching. Either way, I doubt you would stretch or break a G5 or G8 bolt with a properly designed bolt on slider.
 

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I think grade 7 has less stretch and grade 8 is an alloy allowing more stretch and less *SNAP*.
Plus, because of stretch, it is advisable to replace G8 any time you remove or retorque.
 

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From: http://www.k-tbolt.com/material_grade.html
Determining Bolt Grade

Bolts of different grades are marked on the head to show what grade bolt they are.

Grade 2

Grade 2 is a standard hardware grade steel. This is the most common grade of steel fastener and is the least expensive. Grade 2 bolts have no head marking (sometimes a manufacturer mark is present).

Grade 5

Grade 5 bolts are hardened to increase strength and are the most common bolts found in automotive applications. Grade 5 bolts have 3 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.

Grade 8

Grade 8 bolts have been hardened more than grade 5 bolts. Thus they are stronger and are used in demanding applications such as automotive suspensions. Grade 8 bolts have 6 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.


The higher grade, the more the fastener has been hardened, it stronger, but more brittle, and thus less stretch. A G8 will withstand more pressure before shearing/breaking but will not stretch as much because it is harder. And thus a G7 will yield more strech than a G8.

more info http://www.raskcycle.com/techtip/webdoc14.html
 

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Shouldn't need G8. G5 is fine for that app.
 

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in theautomotive world, just dont go less than grade 5 sae, or 8.8 metric.....


sae 8 is fine... you arent going to see he forces to have issues with a 5 or 8
 

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The higher grade, the more the fastener has been hardened, it stronger, but more brittle, and thus less stretch. A G8 will withstand more pressure before shearing/breaking but will not stretch as much because it is harder. And thus a G7 will yield more strech than a G8.

more info http://www.raskcycle.com/techtip/webdoc14.html
Yep. Lesser grades stretch before they fail.

Grade 8 bolts are more brittle and just pop when they go...



Depends on the design. I could have used Grade 5 on my sliders, because the bolts are there only to hold the sliders in place. The sliders apply all the force to the frame, not to the bolts.

But I still used Grade 8 fine thread. Why not? Because I can...
 
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