TTORA Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
first time on the board, hello all!
Anyway, what is the difference, performance wise, in the EZ lift spacers that go on top of the coil assembly (requiring no compressor) and the tradition spacer that inserts into the assembly via compressing the coilover. (IE toytec, revtek, and cornfed). If its so much easier to NOT compress the spring and get the same results why not do it? I'm guessing there is a performance issue, so whats the verdict?
 

·
Not really here...
Joined
·
3,013 Posts
NCSTATETACO said:
first time on the board, hello all!
Anyway, what is the difference, performance wise, in the EZ lift spacers that go on top of the coil assembly (requiring no compressor) and the tradition spacer that inserts into the assembly via compressing the coilover. (IE toytec, revtek, and cornfed). If its so much easier to NOT compress the spring and get the same results why not do it? I'm guessing there is a performance issue, so whats the verdict?
A member named hytenor will likely give you a more detailed answer tomorrow, but basically the EZ-lift (or top-load) spacer will run the very probable risk of hyperextending your inner tripod joints and overextending your axles. That's why it's recommended that anyone running that type of lift install limit straps, to help prevent it from happening. I think the largest top-load spacer you can run (again, using limit straps), would be .5" thick, which provides about 1" of lift. The more traditional spacer lifts you mentioned do not typically present the hyperextensin/overextension issues.
 

·
Going John Galt
Joined
·
31,845 Posts
synovus said:
A member named hytenor will likely give you a more detailed answer tomorrow, but basically the EZ-lift (or top-load) spacer will run the very probable risk of hyperextending your inner tripod joints and overextending your axles. That's why it's recommended that anyone running that type of lift install limit straps, to help prevent it from happening. I think the largest top-load spacer you can run (again, using limit straps), would be .5" thick, which provides about 1" of lift. The more traditional spacer lifts you mentioned do not typically present the hyperextensin/overextension issues.
very good, grasshopper ;)
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top