TTORA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I can't afford to lift and get bigger tires at the same time. So should I go up to 265/75/16 and live with the rubbing for a while or get the lift first and do without mud tires until the fall?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
Since you need a lift to fit bigger tires it would seem that the question answers itself. I suggest that you keep both down to a manageable roar. In that case maybe you can afford to do both at the same time. All you need for that tire size is about 2.5" of suspension lift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I was in the same situation as you. But I was in need of tires soon. I was able to fit 32's on Wheeler's Steelies with no prob. I only had to do the pinch weld....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,544 Posts
Not to contradict the dick.... but do you really need lift to clear 265's? I have read many places guys running them stock, its only ~1.2" taller, so .6 on the radius...

Second, one of the things that annoys me most is the misnomer that susp lift, like a 2.5" spacer provides more room for tires... it doesnt. This is a offroad board, so I am going to assume people take their rigs offroad, when you go offroad your truck flexes. Unless you install a bracket lift, or bumpstop spacers your suspension will compress to the original location, you have raised the ride height, but the suspension arc is not changed, therefor you do not have room for bigger tires. You have more room on the street due to increased ride height, but there is no additional room for bigger tires....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
Save your coin and do it both at the same time...that way you don't kick yourself for wanting bigger tires after you lift and your truck doesn't look funny with a lift and pizza cutters on it.. :2cents:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
Dick Foster said:
Since you need a lift to fit bigger tires it would seem that the question answers itself. I suggest that you keep both down to a manageable roar. In that case maybe you can afford to do both at the same time. All you need for that tire size is about 2.5" of suspension lift.
X2. Running 32"s here with about 2.5" of lift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
I ran 32s on my 2004 with minor rubbing offroad but its no big deal. They only rubbed bad if I got the front tires off the ground or doing something else dumb. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,467 Posts
Really depends on the terrain that you wheel in. If you do a lot of rocks and harder dirt, then you may consider a lift first. If you wheel in mud or softer dirt then you will probably be best fit for some good A/Ts or M/Ts.

In the end though you will likely lift the truck in the future once you start to reach the limits of the vehicle. After the lift comes another set of tires so I would have to recommend you go with a lift first.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
How could getting your tires off the ground rub? Unless you're talking about jumping, then yes that is probably dumb unless you have it beefed way the hell up for desert stuff. I got tires hanging in the air all the time when I was still IFS. It's unavoidable unless you wheel nothing worse than fire roads. But then again that's not exactly wheeling is it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
caveman said:
I can't afford to lift and get bigger tires at the same time. So should I go up to 265/75/16 and live with the rubbing for a while or get the lift first and do without mud tires until the fall?
Since you posted in the appropriate folder I'll go easy on you. You can run 265/75/16's on most stock tacos, but you will likely rub the frame at full lock turns and depending on the condition of your suspension, may rub the pinch weld area or front tupperware. Now, for future reference, it would be helpful for you to either create a sig with your truck's vital info, or post that information before you ask your question. This one is fairly simple because the answer is essentially the same for both pre-05 tacos as well as the latest generation, but this is about where the similarities stop. Also, this subject has been beaten to death and a simple search would have yielded the answers you are looking for. I did just what you are asking without any lift for about a year without any problems....if it's time for new tires, then without question, buy new tires. If you just have $$$ that you want to spend, but your tires are good, get your lift or protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,544 Posts
It was the width that probally caused the rubbing there.. .why such a wide tire?

With 265/75 only being taller than 265/70 fitment shouldnt be an issue on a stock truck..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
It's called traction and rocks. Pizza cutters find too many cracks to fall into. You can beef up your belly and drag it but changing CVs gets real old pretty fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,544 Posts
True... I guess I prefer the skinnier tire.. even thou they aren't as good on rocks... they do just fine for me on all the other stuff...

Thou I must say I LOVE my 35 BFG's...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
i had 265/75/16's on my truck stock for a few months with saggy worn out suspension. they rubbed alittle when turning and stuff. it was irritating but it was ok. might as well just get a lift first though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I'm running 265 75 r16 on my stock 2003 taco.. justs rub on hard turns out of the drive way and parking lots. Now when wheeling, you hear a little, but no harm.. give er hell.. have fun.. thats the main thing..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
ah64id said:
Not to contradict the dick.... but do you really need lift to clear 265's? I have read many places guys running them stock, its only ~1.2" taller, so .6 on the radius...

Second, one of the things that annoys me most is the misnomer that susp lift, like a 2.5" spacer provides more room for tires... it doesnt. This is a offroad board, so I am going to assume people take their rigs offroad, when you go offroad your truck flexes. Unless you install a bracket lift, or bumpstop spacers your suspension will compress to the original location, you have raised the ride height, but the suspension arc is not changed, therefor you do not have room for bigger tires. You have more room on the street due to increased ride height, but there is no additional room for bigger tires....
I agree with John (Ah64id). I don't understand how changing the stock tires from 265/70R16 to 265/75R16 can be a problem being only 1.2" larger in diameter. When my stock 265/70/R16 BFG are spent, I'm looking at replacing them with Cooper STT 265/75R16. My truck is an 06 TRD offroad and I can't see how there would be any rubbing with the same tire width and adding 0.6" to the radius. I don't know the year of caveman's truck though.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
When you increase the diameter, the wheel is now closer to all components mainly the frame, the mud flaps, the pinch weld, and the bumper plastic. I went ahead and got some 265/75/16's and put them on the stock wheels this week but after doing my research I got some that were on the small side according to the manufacturer's dimensions when compared to most others plus the price was right. I went with Maxxis Bighorns($567 OTD). So far no rubbing but they are much closer to the flaps, p.weld, and valance. I'll go wheeling tomorrow so I'll see if they rub offroad. They ride great for an MT and look tough. I just need some black steelies and an upgraded suspension. I wanted the STT's but couldn't spend that much $ right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Just wait a lil while and do everything at once, it will be like a completely different truck that way
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
About this Discussion
24 Replies
17 Participants
ah64id
TTORA Forum
TTORA forum is the best Toyota off-road club around. We are nation wide with chapters in most states. Come in and discuss Tacoma, 4Runner, Highlander, & TRD models.
Full Forum Listing
Top